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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Remember 1814
 
Remember 1814 Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 15, 2008
1. Remember 1814 Marker
 
Inscription. Fort McHenry protected the water approaches to Baltimore for more than a hundred years, but was attacked only once. On September 13-14, 1814, British ships fired rockets and mortars at the fort for twenty-five hours. Fort McHenry withstood the bombardment, and when the smoke cleared the American flag was still waving where you see it now.

Francis Scott Key watched these dramatic events from the deck of a truce ship down the river to your left. His description of the battle was immortalized in “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the song that later became our National Anthem.

The fort has undergone many changes since 1814, yet many original structures survive in whole or part. Historic sites on this tour will help you to recall those unforgettable hours when Fort McHenry’s defenders saved a city and inspired a song.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland, Fort McHenry marker series.
 
Location. 39° 15.85′ N, 76° 34.802′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker can be reached from E Fort Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is on grounds of Fort McHenry National Monument, at the beginning of the walking trail of the fort. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21230, United States of America.
 
Map of Fort Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, May 16, 2010
2. Map of Fort
 

 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Armistead (within shouting distance of this marker); Allegiance by Force (within shouting distance of this marker); Evolution of Fort McHenry (within shouting distance of this marker); Preservation of Earthworks (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine (within shouting distance of this marker); Commanding Officer’s Quarters (within shouting distance of this marker); British Bomb (within shouting distance of this marker); A Star Spangled Centennial (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
More about this marker. The middle of the marker contains a picture of Fort McHenry under attack by the British fleet. It has a caption of “The British attack on Baltimore came during the closing months of the War of 1812. The enemy fleet fired more than 1,500 mortar bombs at the fort, but inflicted little damage. Unable to destroy the cannon in the fort’s water batteries, the British abandoned their attempt to capture the city. Painting courtesy Maryland Historical Society.”

The right of the marker features a map of the fort grounds as they are today. The caption is “Fort McHenry in 1814 - The brick walls and earthen parapets of Fort McHenry have changed somewhat since 1814. Other structures have long since disappeared.
Many of the buildings inside the fort were modified for military purposes after 1814. Other structures were added later, that do not appear on the map.
Locations of several early buildings outside the fort are outlined in brick on the lawn.”
 
Marker in Fort McHenry National Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 15, 2008
3. Marker in Fort McHenry National Monument
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. National Park Service. (Submitted on August 30, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Battle of Baltimore. HistoryCentral.com. (Submitted on August 30, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Direction of British Attack Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 15, 2008
4. Direction of British Attack
This photo looks out from the fort in the direction of the British fleet. The heavy guns in the photo were placed in Fort McHenry after the 1814 battle.
 
 
Entrance to Fort McHenry Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 15, 2008
5. Entrance to Fort McHenry
This Sally Port is the only access to the interior of Fort McHenry.
 
 
Inside Fort McHenry Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 15, 2008
6. Inside Fort McHenry
This is the parade ground of Fort McHenry. The Commanding Officer's Quarters and the Guard House can be seen in the photo to the left of the flag.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on August 30, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,338 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on August 30, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on August 24, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 30, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
 
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