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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Luray in Page County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Willow Grove Mill

Burning the Bread Basket

 
 
Willow Grove Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, 2002
1. Willow Grove Mill Marker
Inscription. On October 2, 1864, elements of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry Division under Col. William H. Powell reached this area near Luray and quickly laid waste to the Willow Grove Mill. Amanda Moore, wife of the millís owner, later recalled, "We had the Mill, Saw Mill, barn ... and all the stabling, granary, corn crib, and everything burnt ... the barns were full of wheat and also there was a great deal in the Mill.”

In addition to Willow Grove, several other flour mills, barns, sawmills, stables, tanneries and lumberyards in Page County also fell under the torch within the next 36 hours.

These events and others like them, were part of Gen. Philip Sheridanís infamous “burnings” in the Shenandoah Valley.

By the time Powell departed five days later, the county had sustained well over $1 million in damages.

By October 24, citizens of Page County petitioned the Confederate government for relief from conscription stating that there was "just sufficient reason to fear starvation will be the fate of some of our citizens should the call for all men be enforced."

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Willow Grove and Mundellsville
Prior to the establishment of the town of Luray in 1812, Willow Grove Mill was the focal point of the thriving village of Mundellsville. Powered by an 18-foot overshot water
Willow Grove Mill and Civil War Trails Marker image. Click for full size.
February 2, 2007
2. Willow Grove Mill and Civil War Trails Marker
wheel, the mill was a prime example of the quality mills that later earned the Valley the title of “Bread Basket of the Confederacy.” Another superb example of a period mill survived the “burnings” and still stands at Edinburg in Shenandoah County.
 
Erected 2002 by Summers-Koontz Camp #490, with the help of a grant from the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 39.245′ N, 78° 27.743′ W. Marker is near Luray, Virginia, in Page County. Marker is on Stonyman Road (County Route 642) east of Business U.S. 340. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Luray VA 22835, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A Slave Auction Block (approx. 0.7 miles away); Massanutten School (approx. 0.7 miles away); Mt. Carmel Baptist Church (approx. 0.7 miles away); White House Ferry (approx. 0.8 miles away); Confederate Heroes Monument (approx. 1.1 miles away); Fort Philip Long (approx. 1.1 miles away); The Chapman-Ruffner House (approx. 1.1 miles away); Cavalry Engagement (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Luray.
 
Regarding Willow Grove Mill. This marker is one of several detailing Civil War
Willow Grove Mill image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, June 2001
3. Willow Grove Mill
Willow Grove Mill was rebuilt after the Burning and thrived as a business well into the 20th century.
activities in Page County, Virginia. Please see the Page County Civil War Markers link below.
 
Also see . . .
1. Avenue of Armies: Civil War Sites and Stories of Luray and Page County, Virginia. for more information about Civil War sites in Luray and Page County, Virginia. (Submitted on July 10, 2007, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.) 

2. Page County Civil War Markers. (Submitted on February 25, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Avenue of Armies: Civil War Sites and Stories of Luray and Page County, Virginia. (Submitted on March 20, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,979 times since then and 343 times this year. Last updated on , by Linda Walcroft of Strasburg, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   2. submitted on .   3. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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