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Manassas Park, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Battle of Bull Run Bridge
“Let this not become another Bull Run”

— Second Manassas Campaign —
 
Battle of Bull Run Bridge Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
1. Battle of Bull Run Bridge Marker
 
Inscription. In August 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson from the Rappahannock River to keep Gen. John Pope’s and Gen. George B. McClellan’s Union armies from uniting. Jackson marched on Aug. 25, and Lee followed the next day with the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia. When Jackson captured Manassas Junction on Aug. 26, Pope thought it was one of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry raids and ordered Gen. George W. Taylor’s reinforced infantry brigade to attack. Jackson’s men, entrenched here in a line between Liberia and Fort Mayfield, greeted Taylor’s command with a “storm of lead” when it arrived about 8:30 the next morning. Taylor fell mortally wounded as his men retreated to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad and the Bull Run Bridge. He turned over command to Col. Eliakim P. Scammon, saying, “Please, let this not become another Bull Run.” After a three-hour-long fight, the surviving Federals fled or surrendered. The Confederates lost only 5 killed and 20 wounded, while Union casualties totaled 23 killed, 176 wounded and 246 missing or captured.

When word of the defeat reached Washington, McClellan (whose army protected the capital) told President Abraham Lincoln that he would not send two divisions to support Pope, as he was uncertain of Pope’s location and the
 
Manassas Markers Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2007
2. Manassas Markers
Two Civil War Trails markers are found at this location. The Battle of Bull Run Bridge marker is seen here on the left.
 
size of the Confederate force. McClellan detested Pope and hoped to replace him if he failed. His refusal contributed to Pope’s defeat at the Second Battle of Manassas (Aug. 28-30), and Lincoln replaced Pope with McClellan on Sept. 2.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 45.944′ N, 77° 26.71′ W. Marker is in Manassas Park, Virginia. Marker is on Connor Drive. Click for map. Marker is just off the New Dominion Alternative School parking lot. Reach the site by taking Manassas Drive east from Centerville Road (Route 28). Then turn south (right) on Euclid Avenue. After a quarter mile, turn east (left) on Connor Drive, following it around to the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20111, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Conner House (here, next to this marker); Manassas 1825 (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Bull Run Bridge (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mayfield Civil War Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (approx. 0.9 miles away).
 
Close Up View of the Map Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
3. Close Up View of the Map
 

 
More about this marker. The marker has a map on the left showing the tactical unit maneuvers during the battle. The map box contains portraits of Gens. Taylor and Jackson. On the right side is a drawing of the Bull Run Railroad Bridge.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Second Manassas Campaign. While not directly discussing the Battle of Bull Run Bridge, this site collects many of the participants accounts regarding the overall campaign. (Submitted on September 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. General Taylor's Biography. (Submitted on September 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional keywords. Second Manassas Campaign
 
Two Civil War Trails Markers at the Connor House Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
4. Two Civil War Trails Markers at the Connor House
 
 
Abutment of the Bull Run Railroad Bridge Photo, Click for full size
November 3, 2008
5. Abutment of the Bull Run Railroad Bridge
View of Abutment on the Fairfax County side of the Bull Run about 1.5 miles in a straight line from marker.
 
 
Close-up of the Abutment Photo, Click for full size
November 3, 2008
6. Close-up of the Abutment
Along the Bull Run-Occoquan Trail
 
 
Confederate Inscription on Prince William County Abutment Photo, Click for full size
May 9, 2009
7. Confederate Inscription on Prince William County Abutment

Warrior Guards Battery, July 19, 1861

This refers to Company “H”, Warrior Guards, 5th Regiment Alabama Volunteers, formed in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.
 
 
Union Inscription on Prince William County Abutment Photo, Click for full size
May 9, 2009
8. Union Inscription on Prince William County Abutment

Troy Guards, 12 P.R.V.C., February 13, 1864, EDP

This refers to the 12th Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on September 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,300 times since then. Last updated on November 3, 2008. Photos:   1. submitted on September 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 9, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on September 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on November 3, 2008.   7, 8. submitted on May 9, 2009. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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