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Falmouth in Stafford County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Hunterís Iron Works
 
Hunter's Iron Works Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., September 26, 2007
1. Hunter's Iron Works Marker
 
Inscription. Located south of here on the Rappahannock River, stood Hunterís Iron Works, founded by James Hunter and was in operation by the 1750s. With the outbreak of the American Revolution, the Rappahannock Forge there supplied the Continental army and navy with muskets, swords, and other armaments and camp implements. Due to its wartime significance, Gov. Thomas Jefferson ordered special military protection for the complex. The ironworks contained a blast furnace, forge, slitting, merchant, and other mills, nailery, coopersí, carpentersí, and wheelwright shops and houses for the managers and workmen. Some of the buildings may have been used for other purposes into the 19th century: none survive today.
 
Erected 2002 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number E-116.)
 
Location. 38° 20.23′ N, 77° 29.135′ W. Marker is in Falmouth, Virginia, in Stafford County. Marker is at the intersection of Warrenton Road (U.S. 17) and Olde Forge Drive, on the right when traveling east on Warrenton Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22405, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Falmouth (approx. 0.4 miles away); Embrey Dam (approx. 1.1 miles away); Gari Melchers Home and Studio (approx. 1.2 miles away); Historic Falmouth (approx. 1.3 miles away); Magistrateís Office (approx. 1.3 miles away); Historic Old Mill District (approx. 1.3 miles away); Amoroleck Encounters John Smith (approx. 1.3 miles away); On this site in 1862... (approx. 1.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Falmouth.
 
Hunter's Iron Works Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., September 26, 2007
2. Hunter's Iron Works Marker
Photograph taken from the North side of Route 17.
 

 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. A marker at James Hunter's Grave
 
Also see . . .
1. Ironworks and the Revolution. In April 1781 Joseph Mercer of Fredericksburg, VA, wrote to Thomas Jefferson, then Governor of Virginia, to send troops and secure his town from the British. His appeal, however, centered specifically on Frederickburgís iron foundry. He wrote: Ö there is not in this State a place more deserving of public attention than this Town and its appendage Mr. Hunterís Iron Works... (Submitted on September 26, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 

2. Embrey work uncovers history. Breaching, storms help unearth dam and millrace for Hunter's Iron Works, an important munitions supplier for the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. An article published in The Free-Lance Star on 11/28/2004. (Submitted on September 26, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. James Hunter is buried at Falmouth Union Church Cemetery, in Falmouth, Va.
James Hunter was the owner and operator of the Hunter Iron Works at Falmouth, which provided the overwhelming majority of muskets and iron cooking implements for the Virginia troops in the Revolutionary War. He produced: muskets, rifles, bayonets, swords, pistols, and large-bore wall guns. For the Virginia Navy he produced: anchors and ship fittings. He outfitted the Virginia troops who played a vital role in the Battle of Cowpens, and also those who were at Yorktown. Hunterís Iron Works were so valuable that Governor Thomas Jefferson ordered special military protection for the industry. Hunter was never adequately paid for his services and he suffered serious financial setbacks as a result. James Hunter sacrificed his fortune for the cause of independence and is considered a true patriot.
http://www.cmmsar.com/graves.html
    — Submitted September 26, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.

 
Credits. This page originally submitted on September 26, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,842 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 26, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Remains of the Colonial-era dam and millrace that were uncovered after this marker was placed • Can you help?
 
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