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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Northwest in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Stevens

 
 
Fort Stevens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
1. Fort Stevens Marker
Inscription. Civil War Defenses of Washington
1861-1865


The partial reconstruction of Fort Stevens that you see today was done by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937. No visible evidence of the original fort remains.

Battle of Fort Stevens
July 11-12, 1864


On July 11-12, 1864, Fort Stevens was the focal point of a Confederate attack by Gen. Jubal Early with his force of 15,000 soldiers. Defended by a meager force of convalescents, quartermaster employees and 100 day militia volunteers, Fort Stevens held back an attack by Confederate skirmishers on July 11. Reinforcements from the Union 6th and the 19th Corps on the second day checked and turned back the only Confederate threat against Washington, D.C., during the war. Late in the afternoon of July 12, President Abraham Lincoln was exposed to Confederate fire while observing this battle where approximately 900 soldiers were killed, wounded, or missing.

Nearby Battleground Cemetery, which was dedicated by President Lincoln soon after the battle, contains the graves of 40 Union soldiers who died in defense of Fort Stevens.
 
Erected by National Parks Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War, the Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location.
Maj. Gen. Isaac Ingalls Stevens image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
2. Maj. Gen. Isaac Ingalls Stevens
38° 57.831′ N, 77° 1.773′ W. Marker is in Northwest, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 13th Street Northwest and Quakenbos Street Northwest, on the right when traveling north on 13th Street Northwest. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20011, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Aunt Betty's Story (within shouting distance of this marker); “Get Down You Fool” (within shouting distance of this marker); Scale Model of Fort Stevens (within shouting distance of this marker); Lincoln Under Fire at Fort Stevens (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Stevens (about 300 feet away); The Rock on Brightwood Avenue (about 500 feet away); A Streetcar Named Brightwood (about 600 feet away); Park and Shop! (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Northwest.
 
More about this marker. On the right side of the marker is a map showing "Other Civil War fort locations administered by Rock Creek Park." The lower portion of the marker is a photograph from the war of a cannon mounted at one of Washington, DC's forts, "During the Civil War, Washington's forts overlooked farm land." The photograph is of a 100-pdr Parrott Rifled Cannon in place at the nearby
Map of Civil War Forts image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 13, 2013
3. Map of Civil War Forts
administered by Rock Creek Park
Fort Totten during the war.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Markers for Fort Stevens and related sites.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Fort Stevens. Battle summary. (Submitted on October 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Isaac Stevens. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Sharpshooter Tree and Confederate Monument
In addition to the reconstructed Fort Stevens and the Battlefield Cemetery, two other sites related to the battle are worthy of note. Inside Walter Reed Army Medical Center is a stone marker commemorating the site of a tree used by Confederate sharpshooters to fire upon Fort Stevens. Further north on Georgia Avenue at the corner of Grace Church Road, in Silver Spring is a simple granite memorial to honor seventeen Confederates who were killed in the battle.
    — Submitted October 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

2. Fort Stevens Particulars
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

Originally
100 Pound Parrot Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 13, 2013
4. 100 Pound Parrot Rifle
During the Civil War, Washington forts overlooked farm land.

(This big gun at Fort DeRussy has long been mis-identified as being at Fort Stevens.)
built in the late summer of 1861 and named Fort Massachusetts, it had a perimiter of 168 yards with 10 cannon and a 200 man garrison. In September 1862, in the wake of the Confederate invasion of Maryland, the fort was expanded with an additional lunette and a stockaded rear face. The fort was then renamed in honor of General Isaac Stevens, who was killed in action at the Battle of Chantilly.

As expanded the fort was armed with two 8-inch siege howitzers, six 24-pdr siege guns, four 24-pdr seacoast guns, five 30-pdr Parrott rifled cannon, one 10-inch mortar, and one 24-pdr Coehorn mortar. The garrison then numbered 423.
    — Submitted October 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Marker at the Entrance to Fort Stevens Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
5. Marker at the Entrance to Fort Stevens Park
Fort Stevens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 13, 2013
6. Fort Stevens Marker
Scale Model of Fort Stevens image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
7. Scale Model of Fort Stevens
Dedicated September 1936
in memory of
The Grand Army of the Republic
by the
Daughters of Union Veterans
of the
Civil War
1861-1865


Note the magazine (raised rectangle on the left side of the fort). The original section of the fort is represented by the enclosure on the right.
Interior of the Reconstructed Fort Stevens image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
8. Interior of the Reconstructed Fort Stevens
The Reconstructed Magazine image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
9. The Reconstructed Magazine
Location of Original Sections of the Fort image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
10. Location of Original Sections of the Fort
Fort Stevens was originally Fort Massachusetts, constructed in 1861. Later the fort was expanded in September 1862 and renamed Fort Stevens. That original section stood where portions of a United Methodist Church stand today.
Historic Emory United Methodist Church, viewed from Georgia Ave. at Quakenbos St., NW image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 8, 2008
11. Historic Emory United Methodist Church, viewed from Georgia Ave. at Quakenbos St., NW
The present church (built in 1922) is the congregation's fourth building near this site. The second was demolished in 1861 to make way for Fort Massachusetts.
Battlefield Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
12. Battlefield Cemetery
Several blocks north on Georgia Avenue is a small tract set aside as a National Military Cemetery, where Federal 40 soldiers were buried.
Stone Marker at Walter Reed Army Medical Center image. Click for full size.
By Kevin A. McGrath, April 5, 2010
13. Stone Marker at Walter Reed Army Medical Center
Marker at the Provost Marshal's Building identifies location of a tree used by Confederates for signalling and sharpshooting.
Four Monuments in Battlefield Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
14. Four Monuments in Battlefield Cemetery
The monuments commemorate Company K, 150th Ohio National Guard, 122nd New York Infantry, 98th Pennsylvania Infantry, and 25th New York Cavalry.
Confederate Memorial at Grace Church image. Click for full size.
By Kevin A. McGrath, April 5, 2010
15. Confederate Memorial at Grace Church
Granite memorial honoring seventeen unknown Confederates war dead buried in the church yard of Grace Episcopal Church in Silver Spring, MD.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,409 times since then and 295 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   11. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   12. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   13. submitted on , by Kevin A. McGrath of Washington, District of Columbia.   14. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   15. submitted on , by Kevin A. McGrath of Washington, District of Columbia. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016.
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