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Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
History of the Monocacy River Valley
 
History of the Monocacy River Valley Marker Photo, Click for full size
By John Miller, September 21, 2010
1. History of the Monocacy River Valley Marker
 
Inscription. The earliest inhabitants of the Monocacy River Valley lived here about 12,000 years ago. These Native Americans lived in territorial, semi-nomadic groups dependent upon hunting, fishing, and food gathering.

When European settlers first came to Maryland, they encountered Native Americans who depended upon farming and who had established villages, being less reliant on hunting and gathering. River valleys such as the Monocacy provided desirable settlement areas, and by the time of permanent European settlement, the Native Americans had been forced to move west.

The German and British settlers brought with them distinctive building styles. The German tradition of stone and timber construction can still be seen in the Monocacy Valley with fine examples such as Scheifferstadt (built ca. 1736) in Frederick. British settlers utilized more brick than stone in construction.

The Monocacy River Valley was opened for settlement in 1730, when Frederick Calvert, sixth Lord Baltimore, offered free land in the area to attract settlers. People of German descent came from Pennsylvania, following the Monocacy River Valley south. English and Scotch-Irish settlers came from Southern Maryland and present day Montgomery County.
 
Location. 39° 20.972′ N, 77° 23.39′ 
 
The Settlement Map Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. The Settlement Map
 
W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Interstate 270, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located at a rest stop/scenic overlook loop reached from west bound I-270. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Battle That Saved Washington (here, next to this marker); Clustered Spires of Frederick (here, next to this marker); Gordon’s Decisive Attack (approx. 0.4 miles away); Thick of the Battle (approx. half a mile away); Thomas Farm (approx. half a mile away); Federal Retreat (approx. half a mile away); Dennis Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away); McCausland’s Attack (approx. 1.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. On the left the marker displays a drawing of a "Native American palisaded village, circa 1585." Next to it is a drawing of various prehistoric spear points. A map on the upper right shows the settlement patterns of the valley. On the lower right is a photograph of Scheifferstadt.
 
Also see . . .  Settlement of the Catoctins. Forming the western edge of the Monocacy Valley, the Catoctins were settled by the same migration patterns. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Markers at the Rest Stop / Overlook Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Markers at the Rest Stop / Overlook
The History of the Monocacy River Valley marker is in the center of the observation walkway behind the center shrubs.
 
 
Scheifferstadt (Built ca. 1736) Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, July 14, 2012
4. Scheifferstadt (Built ca. 1736)
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Prehistoric Projectile Points Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, July 14, 2012
5. Prehistoric Projectile Points
Close-up of image on marker
 
 
Goodloe Edgar Byron<br>1929-1978 Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
6. Goodloe Edgar Byron
1929-1978
This scenic overlook is dedicated to Congressman Byron, a native of Williamsport, Maryland, who represented Maryland's 6th District from 1970 to 1978. He served as a Captain with the U.S. Army's Third Armored Division. An avid outdoorsman and marathon runner, Congressman Byron was responsible for legislation that created the Monocacy Battlefield National Park, visible to the south.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,543 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on September 22, 2010, by John Miller of Rising Sun, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on May 28, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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