HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Bloomfield in Davis County, Iowa — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
The Confederate Invasion of Iowa Monument
 
The Confederate Invasion of Iowa Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Dann Hayes
1. The Confederate Invasion of Iowa Marker
 
Inscription.
Site of
The Confederate Invasion of Iowa
12th Day of October 1864.

This monument marks the northern most point of incursion into Iowa by Confederate Forces. On October 12, 1864, Lieutenant James “Bill” Jackson led twelve heavily armed Missouri Partisan Rangers dressed in Union uniforms in a raid through Davis County, Iowa, resulting in the murder of three local citizens. • This Plaque Dedicated in 2005 • Davis County Civil War Guerrilla Raid Society.

(plaque to the left of main plaque) In Honor Of Those Citizens of Davis County Who Sacrificed And Served to Preserve The Union. • Donated in 2005 by Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.

(plaque to the right of main plaque) Confederate Partisan Rangers Came From Missouri To This Point, The Furthest North Of Any Confederate Incursion During the Civil War. • Donated in 2005 by the Sons of Confederate Veterans of the Civil War.
 
Erected 2005 by Davis County Civil War Guerrilla Raid Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 40° 44.5′ N, 92° 25.133′ 
 
Monument for The Confederate Invasion of Iowa in Davis County, Iowa. Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Dann Hayes
2. Monument for The Confederate Invasion of Iowa in Davis County, Iowa.
 
W. Marker is in Bloomfield, Iowa, in Davis County. Marker is on County Road V 20, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bloomfield IA 52537, United States of America.
 
Regarding The Confederate Invasion of Iowa Monument. This monument marks the farthest north that any Confederate soldiers reached during the Civil War, at 40 degrees, 44½ minutes north latitude. General Morgan’s raid ended two miles west of West Point, Ohio, at 40 degrees, 41½ minutes north latitude (about five miles short of what Jackson reached), and claims to be the northernmost incursion of any officially organized Confederate body.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. What Was the Northern most "Battle" of the Civil War?
 
Additional comments.
1. "Northernmost Engagement"
The "secret" to this marker is reading the fine print. Is this is the "northernmost" battle? Well perhaps and perhaps not. A marker for "Morgan's Raid" in Ohio also claims that distinction (see related markers).
And we also have the question of St. Albins in Vermont. Well again, many contend the raiders there were not true "Confederate soldiers" but rather partisans (or other unsavory words).

Truth be known, NONE of these locations are properly the northernmost battle. That distinction goes to an action fought on June 27, 1865 off the coast of St. Lawrence Island, in the Bering Sea, now part of Alaska. Yes, well after the surrender of troops on land, a Confederate privateer named the CSS Shenandoah captured and burned Union whalers. Thus in addition to being the northernmost and westernmost, the action was among the last battle of the Civil War. (And the CSS Shenandoah also fought the easternmost and likely the southernmost actions of the war during her voyage.)
 
Plaque on the Left of the Main Plaque Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Dann Hayes
3. Plaque on the Left of the Main Plaque
 
    — Submitted March 15, 2011, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
Plaque on the Right of the Main Plaque Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Dann Hayes
4. Plaque on the Right of the Main Plaque
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on September 19, 2007, by Michael Dann Hayes of Malcom, Iowa. This page has been viewed 4,365 times since then. Last updated on September 23, 2010, by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 19, 2007, by Michael Dann Hayes of Malcom, Iowa. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
Recommend or Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 211 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.