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Pendleton in Anderson County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Barnard Elliott Bee
 
Barnard Elliott Bee Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
1. Barnard Elliott Bee Marker
 
Inscription.
Born Charleston, S.C., 1824.
Graduated West Point 1845.
Brigadier General, C.S.A., 1861.
Commanded 3rd Brigade,
Army of the Shenandoah.
July 21, 1861, at Manassas, Va., where he gave Gen. T.J. Jackson the name "Stonewall." Mortally wounded, he died July 22, 1861, and is buried in his family plot in St. Paul's churchyard.
 
Erected 1968 by Piedmont District, South Carolina United Daughters of the Confederacy. (Marker Number 4-10.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 34° 39.098′ N, 82° 46.609′ W. Marker is in Pendleton, South Carolina, in Anderson County. Marker is on East Queen Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located on the south side of Queen Street when heading east, near St. Paul's churchyard. Upon entering the front gate, following the brick path to your right. About 1/2 way down the path, you will come to the Bee/Stevens monument and tombstones. Marker is in this post office area: Pendleton SC 29670, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Clement Hoffman Stevens (a few steps from this marker); Thomas Green Clemson (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Thomas Green Clemson (within shouting distance of this marker); Printer John Miller (approx. ľ mile away); African American School Site (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pendleton (approx. 0.4 miles away); Hunter's Store (approx. 0.4 miles away); Health & Heritage Walking Trail (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pendleton.
 
Barnard Elliott Bee Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
2. Barnard Elliott Bee Marker
 

 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Another Bee marker , Manassas Virginia
 
Also see . . .
1. Barnard Elliott Bee, Jr. Barnard Elliott Bee Jr. (February 8, 1824 – July 22, 1861) was a career United States Army officer and a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. (Submitted on November 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. General Barnard Elliott Bee, Original Member of the Aztec Club, 1847. Born in Charleston, SC, he was a brother of General Hamilton P. Bee. (Submitted on November 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Barnard Bee Monument. Located on the battlefield at Manassas. (Submitted on July 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Confederate Army of the Shenandoah. The Army of the Shenandoah was an army of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. (Submitted on November 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. The Civil War in South Carolina: Brigadier-General Clement Hoffman Stevens. Brigadier-General Clement Hoffman Stevens was born in Norwich, Conn., August 14, 1821, the son of Lieut. Clement W. Stevens, United States navy, and Sarah J. Fayssoux, daughter of Dr. Peter Fayssoux, Surgeon-General of the Army in South Carolina during the War of the Revolution. (Submitted on September 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
General Barnard Elliott Bee<br>1824-1861 Photo, Click for full size
circa 1861
3. General Barnard Elliott Bee
1824-1861
 

6. 24th South Carolina Infantry. (Submitted on November 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
7. History of St. Paulís Church, Pendleton. St. Paulís, Pendleton, has been so long a part of the local scene and so long a part of the activities of the Episcopal Church in the upper part of South Carolina, we may tend to accept its presence and forget its history and its uniqueness. (Submitted on November 27, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Pendleton Historic District. Pendleton, original county seat of Old Pendleton District (now Anderson, Oconee, and Pickens counties) is one of South Carolinaís earliest upcountry towns. (Submitted on November 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Brigadier General Barnard Bee
Although a native of Charleston, Bee really considered himself a Texan. His father had moved the family there to become the secretary of state when Texas was still a republic. Bee graduated from West Point in 1845, far down in class ranking. He fought in Mexico and was fighting Indians when he left the army in March 1861 to join South Carolina's forces. Why he joined a South Carolina unit instead of a Texas one is a bit of a mystery. Bee was made a brigadier general on June 17, 1861, just a month before the war's first
 
Brig. Gen. Clement Hoffman Stevens<br>1821-1864 Photo, Click for full size
4. Brig. Gen. Clement Hoffman Stevens
1821-1864
 
big clash at First Manassas.

In that battle, Bee's troops were falling back in disarray under pressure from superior Federal forces. Bee was trying to think of something to stem the tide when his eye caught another regiment in the rear that was not moving. Behind the regiment, astride a little sorrel horse, was a general clad in a blue uniform. Bee sang out to his troops, 'There stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally around the Virginians!'

There have always been two theories about this famous rallying cry. One theory claims that Bee was trying to impress his troops with how coolly the Virginians were holding their ground as the Federals advanced toward them. The other theory is not at all popular with Virginians. Some historians believe Bee was really cursing Jackson for keeping his troops in the rear when Jackson could plainly see that Bee's regiments were being cut to pieces. One wonders if Bee's next most famous call would have been: 'Jackson, get your butt down here, and help me shoot these Yankees!' History will never know. Within minutes, Bee was cut down. He died the next day, without knowing that he had created the most famous nickname any general bore during the war. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Jackson, jokingly called 'Tom Fool' to that point, would be remembered as 'Stonewall' Jackson forever. (Source: Touring the Carolinas' Civil War Sites,
 
Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - St. Paul's Episcopal Church Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
5. Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - St. Paul's Episcopal Church Cemetery
 
Clint Johnson (2003), pages 357-358.)
    — Submitted November 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Brigadier General Clement Stevens
Bee's brother-in-law, Clement H. Stevens, was born in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1821, but the family soon moved to Pendleton, the hometown of his mother. At the start of the war, he was a banker in Charleston and married to Bee's sister, giving him some clout in securing a good position in the army. Stevens was the designer of the 'floating battery', the wood-and-iron battery that floated in the water and was used against Fort Sumter.

Wounded at First Manassas while serving as an aide to his brother-in-law, Stevens impressed someone enough to secure a commission as a colonel of the 24th South Carolina Infantry. He fought with that unit at the battle of Secessionville on Morris Island south of Charleston. He was then transferred west, where he fought at Vicksburg and Chickamauga. He was wounded again at Chickamauga. Somewhere along the way, his men started calling him 'Rock.' Stevens returned to duty as a brigadier general on January 20, 1864. His luck finally ran out on July 20, 1864, when he received his last and fatal wound at the battle of Peachtree Creek, at today's downtown Atlanta. He died five days later, three years and three days after his brother-in-law. (Source: Touring the Carolinas' Civil War Sites, Clint Johnson (2003), pages 358.)
 
Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - West Side Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
6. Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - West Side
Barnard Elliott Bee
Brig. Gen'l
C.S. Army

Died
July 22, 1861
of wounds received
in the Battle of Manassas

July 21, 1861
Aged
37 Y'rs &
5 Mo's.
 
    — Submitted November 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - South Side Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
7. Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - South Side
Gen'l B.E. Bee
"If thou a noble soldier art
That passest by this grave, mark
That moulders here a gallant heart
For this man was a brave man."
 
 
Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - East Side Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
8. Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - East Side
Clement H. Stevens
Brig. Gen'l
C.S. Army
Born
August 14, 1821.
Mortally wounded in the
Battle of Atlanta
July 20, 1864.
Died
July 25, 1864.
 
 
Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - North Side Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
9. Barnard Elliott Bee / Clement H. Stevens Monument - North Side
Gen'l C.H. Stevens
"If thou art staunch without a stain
Like the unchanging true,mark
This a kinsman o'thine own,
For this man was a true man."
 
 
Barnard Elliott Bee Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
10. Barnard Elliott Bee Tombstone
Barnard Elliott Bee
Brig Gen
Confederate States Army
Feb 8 1824 Jul 22 1861
 
 
Clement Hoffman Stevens Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
11. Clement Hoffman Stevens Tombstone
Clement Hoffman Stevens
Brig Gen
Confederate States Army
Aug 14 1821 Jul 25 1864
 
 
Clement Hoffman Stevens Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
12. Clement Hoffman Stevens Tombstone
 
 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 27, 2008
13. St. Paul's Episcopal Church
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,950 times since then. Last updated on December 15, 2010, by Bill Thayer of Chicago, Illinois. Photos:   1. submitted on September 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on July 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on November 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on November 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on November 27, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
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