HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Childersburg in Talladega County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
The De Soto Trail
Alabama De Soto Trail

ó Chief Coosa And His Dominion ó
 
The De Soto Trail Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Tim & Renda Carr, June 16, 2011
1. The De Soto Trail Marker
 
Inscription.
1492 - Columbus visits Caribbean islands
1519 - Pineda visits Mobile area
1528 - NarvŠez reaches Mobile area
1540 - De Soto explores Alabama
1559 - De Luna retraces De Sotoís route in Alabama
1702 - French establish first permanent colony at Dauphin Island

Today, after 450 years of searching, the exact route of Hernando de Soto through the southeastern United States remains the foremost historical mystery of the South. Despite the work of professional and amateur archaeologists and historians, and a national commission, there are still several alternate routes that have their defenders.

The problem is that even with a large army, De Soto left very little physical evidence along the route and neglected to record accurate latitude and mileage measurements.

A major study in the search for the De Soto route was in the 1939 (400th anniversary) United States De Soto Commission report. This report presented an “official” route that was intended to combine the best features of the various hypotheses developed at that time. Since then a great deal of archaeological work has been done (over 300 Indian sites have been studied in Alabama alone).

The route that now has the widest acceptance is that of Dr. Charles Hudson of the University of Georgia and his associates.
 
The De Soto Trail Marker / Chief Coosa And His Dominion (Side B) Photo, Click for full size
By TRCP Alliance, July 23, 2011
2. The De Soto Trail Marker / Chief Coosa And His Dominion (Side B)
 
Most scholars in Alabama agree with that route from the point where it enters northeastern Alabama near Piedmont, down the Coosa River Valley and into the Montgomery-Selma area. There are those who believe that from there De Soto went south to the forks of the Alabama-Tombigbee rivers. This route tends to follow that of the 1939 United States Commission. Other scholars think De Soto may have gone west from Selma. Hudson thinks he went northwest.

The route that has been marked as the Alabama Highway Route of the De Soto Trail is primarily that of Charles Hudson. It has been approved by the Alabama De Soto Commission as being based on the best currently available evidence. Only further archaeological exploration is likely to settle this question definitely.


Reverse:
Chief Coosa And His Dominion
Hernando de Soto first heard of the chiefdom of Coosa in April 1540 while traveling through eastern Georgia. Three months later, as his army approached the main town, the Spaniards were met by a large procession of Indian noblemen arranged in military rank and file, some singing and playing flutes. A number of them carried a litter on their shoulders bearing the powerful Chief Coosa. Seated on a cushion, the chief was wearing a fur cloak and a crown of feathers. The Spaniards were so impressed by this chief, his subjects, and his country
 
The De Soto Trail Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Tim & Renda Carr, June 16, 2011
3. The De Soto Trail Marker
 
that the later expedition of Tristan de Luna planned to return and settle a European town there.

The chief and his principal town both bore the name Coosa. The Spaniards described the center of this area as being thickly settled in numerous communities with corn fields in between. There were two streams which united within the main town, and a mountain range lay to the north. Coosa had three earth mounds, and on each one was a building belonging to the chief, in which De Soto and some of his men quartered themselves.

After a stay of three weeks, De Soto's army left Coosa, bearing southward in order to rendezvous with supply ships at Ochuse on the Gulf of Mexico. De Soto abducted Chief Coosa and carried away many of his subjects in chains. When soldiers and priests under Tristan de Luna arrived at Coosa twenty years later, they were amazed at how the once-thriving country had diminished in the wake of De Soto's pillaging and slave-taking.

At its height, Chief Coosa's dominion covered a large area including portions of the present Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. It was clearly one of the most important chiefdoms in the eastern United States during the sixteenth century. Its descendants formed an important segment of the Creek Confederacy some 200 years later, with the main town located at that time near what is now Childersburg, Alabama.
 
Location.
 
The De Soto Trail Marker and De Soto's Visit Stone Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Tim & Renda Carr, June 16, 2011
4. The De Soto Trail Marker and De Soto's Visit Stone Monument
 
33° 16.624′ N, 86° 21.564′ W. Marker is in Childersburg, Alabama, in Talladega County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 280 and Childersburg Fayettville Highway (State Highway 76), on the right on U.S. 280. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Childersburg AL 35044, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. De Soto's Visit (here, next to this marker); History Of Childersburg (approx. 0.3 miles away); Coosa (approx. 2.2 miles away); DeSoto Caverns (approx. 5.1 miles away); Harpersville Garden of Memories (approx. 6.1 miles away); Historic Harpersville (approx. 6.3 miles away); Confederate Forts (approx. 6.7 miles away); Stars Fell On Alabama / Hodges Meteorite (approx. 7.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Childersburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Hernando de Soto, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on July 10, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
2. American Conquest: The Oldest Written Record of Inland America. (Submitted on July 10, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
The De Soto Trail Marker / Chief Coosa And His Dominion (Side B) Photo, Click for full size
By TRCP Alliance, July 23, 2011
5. The De Soto Trail Marker / Chief Coosa And His Dominion (Side B)
 
 
The De Soto Trail Winds Through The Southeast of the United States. Photo, Click for full size
By Tim & Renda Carr, June 16, 2011
6. The De Soto Trail Winds Through The Southeast of the United States.
 
 
De Soto's Trail Through What is now the State of Alabama. Photo, Click for full size
By Tim & Renda Carr, June 16, 2011
7. De Soto's Trail Through What is now the State of Alabama.
 
 
Image of a Indian Village Drawn During De Soto's Visit. Photo, Click for full size
By Tim & Renda Carr, June 16, 2011
8. Image of a Indian Village Drawn During De Soto's Visit.
 
 
The Highway Route Photo, Click for full size
By TRCP Alliance, July 23, 2011
9. The Highway Route
The Highway Route of the De Soto Trail is intended to follow the actual trail as closely as major highways permit. These highways are U.S. 278 from the Georgia line to Piedmont , Ala.; Ala. 21 to Winterboro; Ala. 76 to Childersburg; U.S. 231 to Montgomery; U.S. 80 to Uniontown; Ala. 61 to Greensboro; Ala. 69 to Tuscaloosa; U.S. 82 to Mississippi.
 
 
Chief Coosa welcomes the Hernando de Soto expedition. Photo, Click for full size
By TRCP Alliance, July 23, 2011
10. Chief Coosa welcomes the Hernando de Soto expedition.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on July 5, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 623 times since then. Last updated on August 3, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. Photos:   1. submitted on July 5, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   2. submitted on August 3, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   3, 4. submitted on July 10, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   5. submitted on August 3, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   6, 7, 8. submitted on July 10, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   9, 10. submitted on August 3, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
Recommend or Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 221 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.