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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Moncks Corner in Berkeley County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Colleton House: “Unmanly Practices” or Legitimate Target?

 
 
Colleton House: “Unmanly Practices” or Legitimate Target? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
1. Colleton House: “Unmanly Practices” or Legitimate Target? Marker
Inscription. After Eutaw Springs, the British retreated to their post at Fair Lawn Plantation. In November 1781, Brig. Gen. Francis Marion sent Col. Hezekiah Maham with 180 horsemen and Col. Isaac Shelby with 200 mountain riflemen to eliminate British foraging parties in the area. When the Whigs moved against the hospital and armory at Colleton House, the outnumbered garrison at nearby Fort Fairlawn did not interfere. Maham and Shelby’s forces captured about 150 British soldiers, officers, and doctors without a fight. Those that were well enough to travel were taken as prisoners of war, and the rest were sent to the fort. Then the house ~ containing a substantial store of guns and supplies ~ was destroyed by fire.

This incident resulted in much controversy about the proper rules of warfare. The British held Maham and Shelby ~ and their commanding officer, Francis Marion ~ responsible for “such unmanly practices” as attacking a “parcel of sick, helpless soldiers in a hospital at Colleton House” and burning the building. Gen. Nathaniel Greene, the senior Continental officer in South Carolina, responded that the military supplies stored in the house had made it a legitimate target. Shelby wrote that it was in fact the British, not he and Maham, who had torched Colleton House, while Louisa Carolina Colleton, the owner of
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
2. Overview
the property, accused the British of burning all of the plantation buildings ~ not only the mansion, but barns, granaries, mills, and the entire slave village.
 
Erected 2012 by Francis Marion Trail Commission of Francis Marion University.
 
Location. 33° 11.599′ N, 79° 58.31′ W. Marker is near Moncks Corner, South Carolina, in Berkeley County. Marker can be reached from Stony Landing Road. Click for map. Marker is in the Old Santee Canal Park. Marker is in this post office area: Moncks Corner SC 29461, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Fair Lawn: An Archeaological Treasure (a few steps from this marker); C.S.S. David (within shouting distance of this marker); Berkeley County Confederate Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Stony Landing House (about 600 feet away); Santee Canal (about 700 feet away); Wadboo Barony (approx. 1.1 miles away); Wadboo Barony: Francis Marion’s Last Headquarters (approx. 1.1 miles away); First Site of Moncks Corner (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Moncks Corner.
 
Categories. Colonial EraWar, US Revolutionary
 
Map on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
3. Map on the marker
The location of Fair Lawn Plantation / Colleton House as depicted in Mills‘ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (1825)
Drawing on the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
4. Drawing on the Marker
The remains of Colleton House, one of the grandest residences in colonial South Carolina, have been heavily disturbed by residential and industrial development. It probably looked much like Pawley House in nearby Georgetown County, depicted here in a contemporary drawing.Courtesy Dr. Ernst Little Helms, III
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 882 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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