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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pendleton in Madison County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Abolitionists Mobbed

 
 
Abolitionists Mobbed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 10, 2013
1. Abolitionists Mobbed Marker
(Side One)
Inscription.
(Side One)
In 1843, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society sent speakers to New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana to hold "One Hundred Conventions" on abolition. When speakers encountered citizens with deeply held racist ideas, they were often targets of violence. On September 16, a crowd gathered near here to listen to George Bradburn, William A. White, and Frederick Douglass.

(Side Two)
During Bradburn's speech, more than thirty men marched in, armed with stones and brickbats, and demanded that the speakers leave. In the assault that followed, White, Douglass, and others were injured. Local supporters defended them and carried them to safety. Douglass spoke the next day at nearby Friends meetinghouse without incident. Rioters went unpunished.
 
Erected 2013 by Indiana Historical Bureau, Madison County Council, Madison County Council of Governments, Town of Pendleton, Historic Fall Creek Pendleton Settlement, Pendleton Business Association, and Friends. (Marker Number 48.2013.1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Indiana State Historical Bureau Markers marker series.
 
Location. 40° 0.381′ N, 85° 44.704′ W. Marker is in Pendleton, Indiana
Abolitionists Mobbed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 10, 2013
2. Abolitionists Mobbed Marker
(Side Two)
, in Madison County. Marker is on N. Pendleton Avenue north of Fall Creek Parkway, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located in the northwest corner of Falls Park north of Fall Creek. Marker is in this post office area: Pendleton IN 46064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Three White Men Were Hung Here (approx. ¼ mile away); The Anderson Street Railway (approx. 7.5 miles away); The First Methodist Church in Anderson Was Built Here (approx. 7.6 miles away); Historic West Eighth Street (approx. 7.7 miles away); Public Square (approx. 7.8 miles away); Massacre of Indians (approx. 7.8 miles away); Madison County Veterans' Memorial (approx. 7.9 miles away); Madison County Historic Home (approx. 8 miles away).
 
Regarding Abolitionists Mobbed. The recollections of Frederick Douglass on the event:

"At Pendleton this mob-ocratic spirit was even more pronounced. It was found impossible to obtain a building in which to hold our convention, and our friends, Dr. Fussell and others, erected a platform in the woods, where quite a large audience assembled. Mr. Bradburn, Mr. White, and myself were in attendance. As soon as we began to speak, a mob of about sixty of the roughest characters I ever looked upon ordered us, through its leaders,
Frederick Douglass, circa 1850-1860 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Frederick Douglass, circa 1850-1860
Image is available from the
United States Library of Congress
to “be silent,” threatening us, if we were not, with violence. We attempted to dissuade them, but they had not come to parley but to fight, and were well armed. They tore down the platform on which we stood, assaulted Mr. White, knocking out several of his teeth; dealt a heavy blow on William A. White, striking him on the back part of the head, badly cutting his scalp and felling him to the ground. Undertaking to fight my way through the crowd with a stick which I caught up in the mélée, I attracted the fury of the mob, which laid me prostrate on the ground under a torrent of blows. Leaving me thus, with my right hand broken, and in a state of unconsciousness, the mob-ocrats hastily mounted their horses and rode to Andersonville, where most of them resided. I was soon raised up and revived by Neal Hardy, a kind-hearted member of the Society of Friends, and carried by him in his wagon about three miles in the country to his home, where I was tenderly nursed and bandaged by good Mrs. Hardy, till I was again on my feet, but as the bones broken were not properly set my hand has never recovered its natural strength and dexterity. We lingered long in Indiana, and the good effects of our labours there are felt at this day. I have lately visited Pendleton, now one of the best Republican towns in the State, and looked again upon the spot where I was beaten down, and have
Abolitionists Mobbed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 10, 2013
4. Abolitionists Mobbed Marker
View to south along N. Pendleton Avenue
again taken by the hand some of the witnesses of that scene, amongst whom was the kind, good lady–Mrs. Hardy–who, so like the good Samaritan of old, bound up my wounds, and cared for me so kindly."

Source: Douglass, Frederick. The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, From 1817 to 1882. London: Christian Age Office, 1882. 198-199.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RR
 
Abolitionists Mobbed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 10, 2013
5. Abolitionists Mobbed Marker
View to north along N. Pendleton Avenue
Abolitionists Mobbed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 10, 2013
6. Abolitionists Mobbed Marker
A tablet listing donors to the marker is affixed to the neighboring boulder
Donors to the Indiana Historical Bureau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 10, 2013
7. Donors to the Indiana Historical Bureau Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 612 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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