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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle Monument

 
 
Part of the Inscription on Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, September 23, 2007
1. Part of the Inscription on Monument
Inscription. Battle of North Point, 12th September, A.D. 1814, and of the Independence of the United States, the thirty-ninth

Bombardment of Fort McHenry, 15th September, A.D. 1814, and of the Independence of the United States, the thirty-ninth.

James Lowry Donaldson, Adjutant of 27th Regt. • Gregorius Andre, Lieutenant 1st Rifle Battalion. • Levi Clagett, 1st Lieut. Nicholson’s Artillerists • John Clemm. • S. Haubert. • T. Wallace • E. Marriot. • J. Armstrong. • Benjn. Bond. • Cecelius Belt. • H. G. McComas. • John C. Byrd. • Daniel Wells, Jr. • Benjm. Neal. • D. Howard. • A. Randall. • J. Gregg. • A.Maas. • T. V. Beaston. • John Jephson. • J. H. Marriot, of John. • Wm. Ways. • J. Richardson. • Clement Cox. • John Garrett. • Wm. McClellan. • M. Desk. • John R. Cox. • B. Reynolds. • Uriah Prosser. • R. R. Cooksey. • J. Evans. • G. Jenkins. • W. Alexander. • T. Burneston. • P. Bayard. • C. Fallier. • J. Dunn. • J. Craig.

(Adjacent interpretive panel affixed to wrought iron fence) Built 1815-1825 to commemorate those who fell in the British attack on Baltimore in September 1814, the Battle Monument stands on the site of Baltimore’s first courthouse. When Calvert Street was leveled in 1784, the courthouse was raised on an arched brick
Bombardment of Fort McHenry Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, September 27, 2015
2. Bombardment of Fort McHenry
platform to allow the traffic to flow beneath it. This courthouse “on stilts” remained perched high above the new street level until 1800, when it was razed and a new structure erected on the west side of Calvert Street.

The Monument was designed by Maximilian Godefroy. The symbolism of its Roman fasces, Egyptian tomb, and griffins reflects the architect’s background in revolutionary France, where great attention was paid to elaborate memorials and civic celebrations. At the Monument base are two bas-reliefs of the North Point Battle and the bombardment of Fort McHenry. The vertical rods of the shaft represent the Union, held together by bands inscribed with the names of those who fell in battle. At the top of the Monument, flanked by an eagle and a bomb, is Godefroy’s statue of Baltimore holding laurel wreath of victory. This was first monument in the country erected to honor the common soldier. Since 1827 the Battle Monument has been the official symbol of the City of Baltimore.
 
Erected 1815 by Citizens of Baltimore.
 
Location. 39° 17.434′ N, 76° 36.739′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of Calvert Street and Fayette Street, in the median on Calvert Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Battle Monument Interpretive panel Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, September 23, 2007
3. The Battle Monument Interpretive panel
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle Monument (a few steps from this marker); The Equitable Building (a few steps from this marker); Discover Baltimore: The Monumental City (a few steps from this marker); Old Post Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Baltimore City Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); The Munsey Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Alex Brown Investment Banking Company (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Alex. Brown & Sons Company Building (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
More about this marker. Monument stands 52 feet high. Statue representing Baltimore is approx. 8½ feet high. The monument was designed by architect J. Maximilian M. Godefroy (c.1770–c.1837). Antonio Capellano was the sculptor of the female figure, the four griffins, and the reliefs.
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
The Battle Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, September 23, 2007
4. The Battle Monument
The Battle Monument Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Line of Battle 1816 engraving, 1816
5. The Battle Monument Marker
It looked just as you see it here on this 1816 engraving from the Philadelphia Port Folio of that year.
Plaque at base of monument installed in 1914. Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, September 23, 2007
6. Plaque at base of monument installed in 1914.
This Monument was erected by the citizens of Baltimore under the management of the Committee of Vigilance and Safety in honor of the gallant defenders of this City and Nation who fell in the Battle of North Point and during the bombardment of Fort McHenry September 12 and 13, 1814. The corner-stone was laid on the first anniversary of the Battle, September 12, 1815, by Edward Johnson, Mayor * Maj. Gen. Samuel Smith * Brig. Gen. John Stricker * Lieut. Col. George Armistead.
<i>Court House and Battle Monument, Baltimore, Md.</i> Photo, Click for full size
circa 1930
7. Court House and Battle Monument, Baltimore, Md.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 7,622 times since then. Last updated on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Randolph E Slaff of Canton, Georgia.   6. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   7. submitted on . This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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