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US Revolutionary War Markers
4732 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 4482
New Brunswick (Saint John County), Saint John — Fort HoweMajor Gilfrid Studholme — Indian Treaty of 1778/Le Traité Indien de 1778
Three markers are mounted on this monument Fort Howe English Late in 1777 Major Gilfred Studholme hurriedly fortified this ridge overlooking the mouth of the Saint John River. Throughout the remainder of the American Revolutionary War the presence of Fort Howe, its guns and garrison, guarded the settlement at the river’s mount from attack by American Privateers, a minority of disaffected settlers, and the local Indians with whom a treaty was made here in 1778. Allowed . . . — Map (db m77537) HM
New Brunswick (Saint John County), Saint John — The Landing of the LoyalistsDébarquement des Loyalistes
English On 10 May 1783 the Spring Fleet, carrying over 2,000 Loyalists, arrived at the Saint John River mouth. The exiles, mostly civilians from the Middle Colonies, established themselves in the newly-surveyed townsites of Parr and Carleton. A second fleet in June, a third in September carrying troops of the Loyalist corps, and numerous individual vessels swelled the number crowded at the river mouth. Preparations for the arrivals was inadequate and many wintered in tents and huts . . . — Map (db m77432) HM
Nova Scotia (Lunenburg County), Lunenburg — Defence of LunenburgLa défense de Lunenburg
English When the British settlement at Lunenburg was established in 1753, the Town plot was enclosed by pickets surrounding the east, north and west ends of the Town. The west end was fortified by four blockhouses placed at strategic intervals between the Front Harbour and the Back Harbour, and another on the east end on Blockhouse Hill. Each of these blockhouses formed a central “keep” of small heavily stockaded fortifications which were built to protect the new community . . . — Map (db m78328) HM
Nova Scotia (Lunenburg County), Lunenburg — The Sack of LunenburgLe Pillage de Lunenburg
English During the American Revolution many coastal settlements were harassed by enemy privateers. On the morning of 1 July 1782 approximately 100 raiders surprised and overpowered Lunenburg’s small defence force, captured the blockhouses and burned the house of the local militia colonel. The privateers then looted the settlement and held the hastily-gathered militia at bay with the threat of total destruction of the town. They escaped that evening with the plunder, prisoners and a . . . — Map (db m78317) HM
Ontario, Hamilton — United Empire Loyalists
In Lasting Memory of the United Empire Loyalists Who preferred to remain loyal British subjects and came to canada in large numbers immediately following the American Revolution of 1776 and the signing of the Treaty of Peace in 1783. —————— On this site in 1785 was erected one of the first log houses in this district by a loyalist pioneer Col. Richard Beasley who on June 11th and 12th 1796 here . . . — Map (db m66131) HM
Ontario, South Dundas — Loyalist American Regiments / Loyalists of the Indian Nations / Sir John Johnson
[ Front of Monument ] Loyalists American Regiments 1775-84 This monument has been erected by a grateful province to commemorate the services of His Majesty's Forces in North America, 1775-84 In particular the following which were disbanded as units and settled along the St. Lawrence River in the new province of Upper Canada. The 84th Regiment (Royal Highland Emigrants) The King's Royal Regiment of New York (Royal Greens) The King's Rangers (Rogers' Corps) The Loyal . . . — Map (db m39747) HM
Ontario (Essex County), Amherstburg — Colonel Matthew Elliott1739 - 1814
Near this site stood the house erected in 1784 by Matthew Elliott. Born in Ireland, he emigrated to the American Colonies in 1761, and during the Revolution served with the British forces as a captain in the Indian Department. He was an Indian agent for the western tribes 1790-95 and deputy superintendent of the Indian Department 1795-98. Elliott represented Essex in the legislative assembly 1801-12. As colonel of the 1st Essex Militia he took part in the capture of Detroit , August 16, 1812, . . . — Map (db m37286) HM
Ontario (Essex County), Amherstburg — Lt. - Colonel William Caldwell
Born about 1750 in Fermanagh County, Ireland, Caldwell emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1773. During the American Revolution he served with the British forces as a captain in Butler's Rangers at Niagara and Detroit. In 1784 he obtained land near the mouth of the Detroit River and became one of this area's earliest settlers. Caldwell's exceptional influence with the local Indians enabled him to obtain control of some 11,000 additional acres on the north shore of Lake Erie where he encouraged former . . . — Map (db m37291) HM
Ontario (Essex County), Amherstburg — Simon Girty U.E.1741 - 1818
Girty's life crossed cultural boundaries between native and white societies on the frontier of American settlement. In 1756 his family was captured by a French-led native war party in Pennsylvania. Simon was adopted by the Seneca, then repatriated in 1764. An interpreter at Fort Pitt (Pittsburgh), he became an intermediary with native nations. In 1778, dismayed over rebel policy on the natives, Girty fled to Detroit. During the Revolutionary War and subsequent conflicts in the Ohio Valley, he . . . — Map (db m34688) HM
Ontario (Essex County), Amherstburg — The WyandotLes Hurons de Detroit
This area was once the home of the Wyandot, remnants of the Huron, Neutrals, and Petuns who were dispersed by the Iroquois in the 1640's. Some eventually reunited and settled along the Detroit River, where they became known as the Hurons of Detroit, or Wyandot. After the fall of New France, the Wyandot became supporters of the British during the American Revolution although many remained neutral in the War of 1812. In the 1840's a number of the Wyandot were moved to a reserve in Kansas while others stayed to help develop this region. — Map (db m37340) HM
Ontario (Frontenac County), Kingston — The King's Royal Regiment of New York
The largest Loyalist Corps in the Northern Department during the American Revolution, the King's Royal Regiment of New York was raised on June 19, 1776 under the command of Sir John Johnson. Originally composed of one battalion with ten companies, it was authorized to add a second battalion in 1780. The regiment, known as the "Royal Yorkers," participated in the bitter war fought on the colonial frontier. It conducted raids against settlements in New York and was also employed in garrison duty. . . . — Map (db m39977) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara Falls — Charles Green1740 - 1827 — United Empire Loyalist
“If the captain wants me, he may come himself and if he does I will shoot him.” With these words, Charles Green refused induction into the N. Jersey rebel militia. Imprisoned, he escaped and joined the “King’s Rangers” a loyalist unit. He “suffered very considerably both in person and property”. At war’s end he walked from N. Jersey leading his wife and two children on horseback. His wife Rebekah, buried next to him, gave birth eight days later to a . . . — Map (db m75879) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara-on-the-Lake — Butler's Rangers
In 1777 John Butler of New York raised a force of Rangers who, with their Iroquois allies, raided the frontiers of New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey throughout the American Revolutionary War. From their base at Fort Niagara they successfully maintained British military power on the frontiers and seriously threatened rebel food supplies. When Fort Niagara became overcrowded in the autumn of 1778, Butler built near here a group of barracks to house his Rangers and their families. Disbanded in . . . — Map (db m75857) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara-on-the-Lake — Fort Niagara
Across the Niagara River is the imposing American stronghold, Fort Niagara. Originally built by the French, then occupied by the British, and finally by the Americans, this fort for nearly 150 years stood guard over the traditional supply route to the Upper Great Lakes. — Map (db m53630) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara-on-the-Lake — Lieutenant-Colonel John Butler 1725-1796
Born in New London, Connecticut, Butler settled in the Mohawk Valley, New York, in 1742. Commissioned in the British Indian Department in 1755, he served in the Seven Years War. At the outbreak of the American Revolution , he was compelled to leave his estates and was ordered to Fort Niagara. In 1777 he organized the Loyalist Corps known as Butler's Rangers. By the end of war, this Unit with British Regulars and Indian Allies, had effectively contributed to the establishment of British control . . . — Map (db m49165) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara-on-the-Lake — Navy Hall
The facilities of this strategic location have served British and later Canadian troops stationed at Niagara from 1765 to the 1920's. — Map (db m49477) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara-on-the-Lake — Niagara Land Purchases
To obtain land on which to settle Loyalists and dispossessed members of the Six Nations of the Iroquois, Guy Johnson in May 1781 and John Butler in May 1784 negotiated treaties with representatives of the Mississauga and Chippewa of this region. The Crown thereby acquired title to a tract of land 6.4 km wide along the west bank of the Niagara River between Lakes Erie and Ontario. These two cessions were later confirmed by a third treaty negotiated by John Graves Simcoe, Lieutenant-Governor of . . . — Map (db m75863) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), Niagara-on-the-Lake — The Fortified Mouth of the Niagara River
The St.Lawrence and Great Lakes system was the most efficient route to the interior of the continent of North America. Large waterways allowed for substantial sailing vessels to trade and maintain contact with Native allies from Montreal to the Mississippi with minimal portages and transhipment in smaller boats. The one great obstacle along the chain of waterways was Niagara Falls whose dramatic height required some control of the land to allow for a portage around the escarpment and the falls . . . — Map (db m53624) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), St. Catharines — Niagara District United Empire Loyalists Memorial
[Upper plaque:] This boulder was on the half-way mark, between Niagara-on-the-Lake and Queenston [Lower plaque:] This memorial is erected in proud memory of pioneer ancestors and to commemorate the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of their arrival in the Niagara District as United Empire Loyalists 1784 • 1934 — Map (db m76095) HM WM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), St. Catharines — Richard Pierpoint c.1744-c.1838
One of the first Black settlers in this region, Pierpoint was born in Senegal. At the age of about 16 he was imprisoned and shipped to America where he became the slave of a British officer. During the American Revolution he enlisted in the British forces, thereby gaining his freedom, and served with Butler's Rangers. Disbanded at Niagara, "Captain Dick" settled near here. At the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the Coloured Corps and in 1821, recalling his militia service, he petitioned . . . — Map (db m75872) HM
Ontario (The Regional Municipality of Niagara), St. Catharines — This Statue of the Honourable William Hamilton Merritt
has been erected by his grandson William Hamilton Merritt of the City of Toronto, son of William Hamilton Merritt Jr. of St. Catharines, as a tribute to the father of Canadian transportaion who through initiatory steps in first waterways and railways earned that title. He projected and carried to a successful completion the bridging of the cataract of Niagara by the Welland Canal 1824-29, the first railway suspension bridge in the world spanning the gorge of the same river 1846-55, and the . . . — Map (db m76186) HM
Quebec (Haut-Richelieu MRC), Saint-Jean — Fort Saint-Jean
L'état de guerre avec les Iroquois incita les Français à bâtir un fort à Saint-Jean en 1666. Un nouveau fort fut érigé en 1748 afin de protéger la colonie française contre les expéditions militaires britanniques qui remontaient la rivière Richelieu. En 1775, deux redoutes furent construites pour défendre contre l'invasion américaine la colonie passée aux mains des Anglais. La même année, le fort soutint un siège de 45 jours dirigé par le général américain Montgomery. A la suite du . . . — Map (db m77015) HM
Quebec (Ville-Marie Borough), Montréal — Le Château Ramezay / Château Ramezay
[Royal Coat of Arms of Canada] Le gouverneur de Montréal Claude de Ramezay fit ériger ici en 1705, par Pierre Couturier, un édifice pour lui servir de demeure. La Compagnie des Indes occidentales, qui le posséda de 1745 à 1763, le fit rebâtir et élargir en 1756 selon les plans de Paul Tessier dit Lavigne. Les gouverneurs généraux résidèrent au Château de 1773 à 1844, les envahisseurs américains s’y logèrent en 1775-1776, et le Conseil exécutif y siégea en 1839. Il abrita après 1849, des . . . — Map (db m36937) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Revolutionary War Battlefield and Burial Ground at Spanish Fort (1780-1781)
During the Revolutionary War, France, Spain, Britain, and the United States were interested in the fate of this region. In March 1780, Spanish forces captured Mobile. They established a palisaded fort with trenches (one mile north of here) to protect nearby Frenchtown, also known as The Village from British forces based in Pensacola. Early on the foggy Sunday morning of 7 January 1781, the British, under Col. von Hanxleden, attacked with about 200 German, Swiss, English, loyalist American . . . — Map (db m61451) HM
Alabama (Chambers County), Lafayette — Lafayette CemeteryChambers County
Lafayette Cemetery, also known as Westview, began in 1934 with the death of Miss Sarah Gipson. Many early pioneers and veterans of East Alabama are buried here including Revolutionary War Patriot Capt. Alexander Dunn, Col. Charles McLemore, Confederate soldier Elliott H. Muse, Senator Thomas Heflin, and Edmonia, a servant to the Allen family. The pavilion was constructed in 1903 in the oldest section of the cemetery for the Confederate Memorial Day programs. The Owen K. McLemore Chapter of the . . . — Map (db m71642) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Grove Hill — Clarke County Soldiers Of The American Revolution
Lemuel Alston, William Armistead, Thomas Bradford, John Bradley, William Cochran, John Cox, John Creighton, Benjamin Darby, John Dean, Sr., Matthew Gayle, John Giles, William Goode, John Harvey, Aaron Lewis, Axom Lewis, Thomas Moody, Elijah Pugh, Joel Rivers, Elias Scarborough, Robert Tobias, Joseph Varner, Tandy Walker, Joshua Wilson. — Map (db m47748) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Tuscumbia's Oakwood Cemetery
This burial ground was designated on General John Coffee's 1817 survey and original map "Plan of a Town at the Coldwater Spring." The oldest tombstone carries the burial date 1821 and the cemetery contains graves of veterans from all wars beginning with the American Revolution, including graves of approximately 100 unknown Confederate soldiers. Captain Arthur Keller, CSA, father of Helen Keller, and Brig. General James Deshler, CSA, are buried here. — Map (db m28567) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Burnt Corn — James Salter
James Salter N. C. 1760-1835 Comsy. 2 Regt. Continental Troops, Rev. War. Member State Legislature Ala 1823-1828 Memorial Erected By Conecuh Chapter 1972 D.A.R. and Decendants Hon. Wiley Salter, Judge Frank T. Salter — Map (db m47979) HM
Alabama (Greene County), Eutaw — Welcome to Eutaw, Alabama: The Gateway To The Black BeltCounty Seat of Greene County
In 1838, Greene County citizens voted to change the town seat from Erie to Eutaw. The City of Eutaw, Alabama was incorporated as a town by and act of the State Legislature on January 2, 1841. Greene County had been named for General Nathaniel Green. The name, Eutaw, was chosen to commemorate the Battle of Eutaw Springs fought in South Carolina in 1781, the battle in which General Greene defeated the British. Since the county had been named for him, the people chose to name the town after his . . . — Map (db m37967) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Greensboro — Greensboro Presbyterian Church
Organized 1823 by Rev. James Hillhouse of South Carolina, with Patrick Norris and William Hillhouse, veterans of American Revolution, as founding elders. Original wooden structure replaced by brick building in 1841 under pastorate of Rev. Thomas Sydenham Witherspoon. Present building erected in 1859 when Rev. J. C. Mitchell was pastor. Old slave gallery may still be seen. — Map (db m33746) HM
Alabama (Henry County), Newville — Old Center Methodist Church/Old Center Cemetery
Old Center Methodist Church The church was organized in 1859. The first building was a log structure located just NW of the present building. In the 1870's it was part of the Newton Circuit and was served by a minister who lived in the parsonage at Newton. He came by horseback and preached once a month. The second church was a wood structure. It was built from hand sawn timber. Mr. Taylor Harrison was head carpenter. In 1956, the current brick structure was built. Old Center . . . — Map (db m71831) HM
Alabama (Houston County), Rehobeth — Big Creek United Methodist Church / Joseph Watford Revolutionary War Veteran
(side 1) Big Creek United Methodist Church One of the oldest churches in southeast Alabama and reportedly the oldest church in Houston County. The first church structure was a log building constructed about 20 yards north of the present building. The second structure was a larger frame building erected in 1865. In 1905, a new frame structure was built. Four Sunday School rooms and a brick exterior were added to the church in 1959. (side 2) Joseph Watford . . . — Map (db m73356) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Lane Park
In 1822 William Pullen, Revolutionary War veteran, acquired this land from the Federal Government for farming. In 1889 his heirs sold the land to the City of Birmingham for use as the New Southside Cemetery which operated from 1889 to 1909 with 4,767 burials. The name changed to Red Mountain Cemetery, then to Red Mountain Park and finally to Lane Park in honor of Birmingham Mayor A.O. Lane. The land was also used for the Allen Gray Fish Hatchery ( fed by Pullen Springs), a stone quarry , a . . . — Map (db m27096) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Wear Cemetery
Established about 1850, Wear Cemetery is located off Old Springville Road to the northeast at Countryside Circle. In the 1800's the Wear family was among the first settlers of the community later known as Clay. Twenty-three remaining graves were identified and documented in 2008. The earliest known burial is that of Samuel Wear (1766-1852), an American Revolutionary War soldier who fought the British in the Battle of King's Mountain at 14 years of age. Other military veterans buried here . . . — Map (db m25113) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Greenhill — Tabernacle ChurchLauderdale County
This is one of the earliest community burial grounds in Lauderdale County. The oldest dated gravestone is for Catherine Hill, first wife of Green Berry Hill, for whom the community is named. She died on June 8, 1825. George Kennedy deeded five acres of land in 1874 to the Trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church South for the establishment of a church and cemetery. Two early circuit rider preachers are buried here, Rev. Henry Hill and Rev. William Walker. Other early families buried here . . . — Map (db m68061) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — Courtland Cemetery-1819-
Side A One of Alabama's oldest and most picturesque town cemeteries, this site was set aside as a burying ground by the Courtland Land Company in its original survey made prior to the incorporation of the town in 1819. Many of the area's earliest settlers and prominent leaders are buried here, including three Revolutionary War veterans. There are a number of unmarked graves of Confederate soldiers. Three Union soldiers were interred here following an 1863 skirmish at the nearby . . . — Map (db m71286) HM
Alabama (Limestone County), Salem — Abner Alloway Strange, Sr.1761-1835 — Veteran of the American Revolution
Approximately 200 yards east of this site are the unmarked graves of Abner Alloway Strange, Sr., and other family members. (The markers were moved to Salem Methodist Cemetery in 1977.) A Sergeant in the Virginia Militia, Strange was at Yorktown under General LaFayette during the American War for Independence. In 1825 he moved from Fluvanna County, Virginia, and erected his log house approximately 100 yards west of this site. At least three of his married children came along in the caravan to . . . — Map (db m32561) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Fisk — 2F3 — Tennessee / AlabamaLincoln County
(Tennessee) Established 1809; named in honor of MAJOR GEN. BENJAMIN LINCOLN of the Revolutionary Army. After service at Saratoga, he was put in Chief Command in the Southern Colonies. Later, he was Secretary of War under the Confederation, 1781-83. (Alabama) Derived from Creek Indian phrase meaning "Here We Rest." In the early 1700s, several Spanish expeditions visited the state. In 1702 the French founded Mobile and settled near Tallapoosa. Alabama became a territory in 1817, a state in . . . — Map (db m30570) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Harris Hill Cemetery
Harris Hill Cemetery is located Sec. 17, T3, and R1E, on the south side of Highway 72 East at the intersection of Moores Mill Road and Highway 72 East in a large clump of trees on a small rise. This is the old home place and family graveyard of Francis Eppes Harris; without a doubt, he and his wife are buried here, but no stones mark their graves. In 2007 with the help of the present owner, Cole Walker, family members and the Twickenham Town Chapter, NSDAR, the old graves and cemetery . . . — Map (db m43878) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Revolutionary War1775 - 1783
I am Ezekiel Reynolds, a citizen of Concord, Massachusetts Colony. My neighbors and I banded together to defend our families and farms and resist the taxation without representation in the British Parliament. We are called Minutemen for our speed in responding to an enemy attack. At Lexington and Concord we assembled and fired the “shot heard around the world” driving the British back to Boston in disgrace. Although they later gained Bunker and Breed’s Hill outside Boston, they lost . . . — Map (db m71404) WM
Alabama (Madison County), New Hope — Whitaker CemeteryMadison County
John Whitaker, born 1761 in Pitt County, NC, was a Revolutionary War Soldier and established this cemetery. He and his second wife Winnie sold their land in Pitt County in 1801 and migrated to Rowan County where Winnie died, then to Mulberry, TN and finally to Madison County, AL. Whitaker, an early settler in the Bend of Paint Rock, arrived here as a widower with seven children. He married Susan Graham and they had 11 children. John Whitaker was the first person buried here after his death in . . . — Map (db m71341) HM
Alabama (Marengo County), Jefferson — Jefferson Baptist Church
established as Mt. Pleasant Baptist by Elder James Yarbrough in 1820 with 27 charter members. By 1834 it had 150 members. Church among the oldest in Demopolis area. Buried in church cemetery are John Gilmore, Reuben Hildreth and John Sample--Revolutionary War veterans who founded Jefferson and helped establish this church. — Map (db m72974) HM
Alabama (Marshall County), Albertville — Liberty Tree Memorial
This American Liberty Elm was named after “The Liberty Tree: Our Country’s first Symbol of Freedom.” On the morning of August 14, 1765, the people of Boston awakened to discover two effigies suspended from an elm tree in protest of the hated Stamp Act. From that day forward, that elm became known as “The Liberty Tree.” It stood in silent witness to countless meetings, speeches and celebrations, and became the rallying place for the Sons of Liberty. In August of 1775, . . . — Map (db m72931) HM WM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Abram Mordecai / Mordecai's Cotton Gin
Side 1 Abram Mordecai 1755-1849 Born October 24, 1755 in Pennsylvania; settled 1783 in Georgia where he became a successful trader among the Cusseta Indians. First U.S. citizen to settle (1785) in what became Montgomery County. Living and marrying among the Creeks, he established a trading house for skins, furs, and medicinal barks two miles from Line Creek. Alabama historian A.J. Pickett visited him in Dudleyville in 1847. Fiercely independent to the end, he died and was . . . — Map (db m71357) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Encanchata
Here at the Indian village of Encanchata, future site of Montgomery, Col. John Tate, last British agent to the Muscogee Nation, recruited and drilled Creek warriors in 1780 to relieve Tories in Augusta, Ga. being besieged by American patriots. — Map (db m71373) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Marquis de Lafayette
On this site stood, until December 1899, the house in which Marquis de Lafayette was given a public reception and ball, April 4, 1825, while on his last tour through the United States. This tablet is placed by the Society of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of Alabama in lasting memory of this illustrious patriot and soldier of the Revolution, the friend of Washington and the youthful champion of liberty. April 4, 1825 - April 4, 1905 — Map (db m70727) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Naming the City of Montgomery / Brigadier General Richard Montgomery
Naming the City of Montgomery Montgomery named for Richard Montgomery, first American general killed in the Revolutionary War. In 1819, the Alabama Legislature combined New Philadelphia and East Alabama to form Montgomery. Walter B. Lucas, later of Lucas' Tavern on Line Creek, suggested the name to Andrew Dexter, prompted by fanfare occasioned by the return of the General's body from Canada to New York City for burial in June of 1818. (Continued on other . . . — Map (db m69297) HM
Alabama (Pickens County), Aliceville — In Memory of James McCrory
who departed this life November 24th 1840 Aged 82 years, 6 months and 9 days. The deceased was a soldier of the Revolution and was at The battles of Germantown, Brandywine and Guilford Court house, and was one of Washington’s life guards at Valley Forge and served his country faithfully during the war. Peace be to the soldier’s dust — Map (db m37522) HM
Alabama (Saint Clair County), Ashville — A County Older Than The State, St. Clair CountyCreated in 1818 in first session of Alabama Territorial Legislature
from lands ceded by Creek Indian Nation in Treaty of Ft. Jackson, 1814. Named for Gen. Arthur St. Clair, hero of Revolution, governor of Northwest Territory. First settlers from Tennessee, Georgia - veterans of Creek Indian War, 1813-14. County seat since 1822 here at Ashville, named for John Ash, prominent settler. Growing population south of Backbone Mt. led to Pell City branch county seat, 1902. — Map (db m28143) HM
Arkansas (Benton County), Lowell — The Butterfield Stagecoach RoadEstablished 1858
This marker, set on the Butterfield Stagecoach Road, is placed near the spot where the trail crossed the east-west road between Huntsville and the Robinson settlement in western Benton County. John Robinson, a Revolutionary soldier, settled here about 1837 and the "road to Robinson" was designated at this point as "Robinson Cross Roads". — Map (db m68781) HM
Arkansas (Jefferson County), Pine Bluff — Auguste La noir de Serville
To honor Auguste La noir de Serville Hero of the American Revolution French Marine served under Count de Grasse Wounded Yorktown, VA Oct. 14, 1781 Died Jefferson Co. Ark. Dec. 30, 1828 — Map (db m30579) HM
Arkansas (Washington County), Fayetteville — Revolutionary War Soldier Memorial(1775-1783)
In Memory to those soldiers who fought for American Independence during the Revolutionary War. These Veterans of the American Revolution came to live and died in Northwest Arkansas Names in left column: Benton County John Robinson Boone County Jordan Milam Madison County James Gage • Job Hobbs • James Stewart • Daniel Sutherland • Johnson Womack Names in center column: Washington County Thomas Garvin • Samuel Gregg • James Leeper . . . — Map (db m21227) HM
California (Monterey County), Monterey — American Revolutionary War Historical Site1779-1783
The people of the Second Royal Spanish Presidio supported the American Colonies through their military preparedness and financial contributions following the Royal Spanish Decree of June 21, 1779. Their support directly aided the victory and independence of the United States of America. Proclaimed on November, 2004 by the California Society, Sons of the American Revolution. — Map (db m63505) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury
Marker Front: Eight families came from Norwalk in 1685 to settle this area which the Indians called Pahquioque. They built their first homes a half mile south of here and made this green their common. The General Court in October 1687 decreed the name “Danbury” although the settlers had chosen “Swampfield.” Beans and other crops helped make Danbury an inland trading center by 1750 with a population of two thousand. At the start of the American Revolution this . . . — Map (db m22836) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 19 — Danbury During the Revolutionary War– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
On April 26, 1777, 2,000 British soldiers, under the command of General Tryon, marched into Danbury. The town was a supply depot for military stores. A Corps of Artificers; skilled craftsmen, such as blacksmiths, were formed into special military units and had camps in town, as well. These men provided the Continental Army and the Colonial Militia with items needed in camp or on the battlefield. A military hospital was also located here. General Wooster set out for Danbury after news . . . — Map (db m72558) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — David Wooster Monument
[ North face ] David Wooster First Maj. Gen. of the Conn. Troops in the Army of the Revolution. Brig. Gen. of the United Colonies. Born at Stratford, Mar. 2, 1710-11. Wounded at Ridgefield, April 27, 1777, while defending the liberties of America, and nobly died at Danbury, May 2, 1777. Of his country Wooster said, “My life has been ever devoted to her service from my youth up. Though never before in a cause like this – A cause for which I . . . — Map (db m23074) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Historic SiteDanbury’s First Episcopal Church
Historic Site Danbury’s First Episcopal Church occupied this site from 1763 until 1884. In 1777, British troops, led by General Tryon, took military stores from the church and burned them in the nearby street, but spared the edifice. Three public schools have stood on this site. The third forms the older part of this school and was built in 1936. In 1947 the Episcopal graveyard, located between the school and the sidewalk was cleared of graves and markers, which were transferred to the . . . — Map (db m72562) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Soldiers and Sailors Memorial
[ Inscribed around the bronze base ] Dedicated to the Soldiers and Sailors of Danbury 1776 1861 1898 1917 Donald E. Curran SC Map (db m22785) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Sybil Ludington
Sybil Ludington On April 26, 1777 this brave sixteen year-old girl rode through the enemy-infested countryside for thirty miles in Putnam County, New York, to warn the local militia that British troops were attacking and plundering Danbury, Connecticut. Donated by Anna Hyatt Huntington — Map (db m25374) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — The Danbury Raid
The revolutionary village which centered about this green with its stores of supplies for the army was sacked and burned by a force of two thousand British April 26, 1777 Warned of the gathering militia the raiders departed next morning in haste but were attacked and harassed by the rising colonials and driven to the shelter of their boats on the sound They kindled a fire that blazed at Saratoga — Map (db m23542) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Earl Cornwallis and the British army in . . . — Map (db m72560) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — The British Invasion
In early July 1779, British General William Tryon led 2,600 British and Hessian soldiers on raids down the Connecticut shoreline to punish residents for their “ungenerous and wanton insurrection” against the Crown. They destroyed homes, provisions and ammunition in New Haven and Fairfield before landing at Norwalk Harbor and what is now Calf Pasture Beach on July 10. The next morning, Hessians and loyalists attacked on the Norwalk River’s west side, while Tyron’s British regiments . . . — Map (db m53442) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Andrew Roland House
Built By Andrew Roland And His Wife Elizabeth Daughter of Governor Fitch 1760 Their Son Saw the British Land And Gave the Alarm — Map (db m65124) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Burr Homestead
Home Of Thaddeus And Eunice Dennie Burr Here Dorothy Quincy and John Hancock President Of The Continental Congress Were Married in 1775 Burned By British in 1779 Rebuilt in 1790 — Map (db m27371) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Dr. Hosea Hurlburt House
Home Of Dr. Hosea Hurlburt 1753 Surgeon in Connecticut Continental Line — Map (db m27565) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Boulder
This boulder commemorates the settlement of Fairfield by Roger Ludlow in 1639 and the burning of the Town by the British July 8, 1779. From the founding of the Town the religious, military and civic life of the people has centered around this Green — Map (db m27227) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Revolutionary War Memorial
1775   1783 In everlasting memory of the Patriots and Soldiers of Fairfield who served in the War of the American Revolution ——— Erected by the Eunice Dennie Burr Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution A.D. 1904 — Map (db m27171) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Isaac Tucker House
Built By Isaac Tucker -- 1766 – Left standing when the British burned Fairfield — Map (db m27158) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Men of Greenfield Hill
In Memory Of The Men Of Greenfield Hill Who Fought In The American Revolution John Alvord • Benjamin Banks 4th • Daniel Banks • David Banks • Ebenezer Banks Esq. • Ebenezer Banks • Elijah Banks • Eliphalet Banks • Gershom Banks • Gershom Banks Jr. • Hyatt Banks • Isaac Banks • Jesse Banks • John Banks • Jonathan Banks • Joseph Banks • Nathan Banks • Nehemiah Banks • Nehemiah Banks Jr. • Moses Betts • Elisha Bradley • Hezekiah Bradley • Hezekiah Bradley Jr. • John Bradley • Joseph Bradley . . . — Map (db m27420) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Nathan Bulkley House
Built 1750 By Nathan Bulkley Pre-Revolutionary Spared By British When Town Was Burned — Map (db m27153) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Southport Wharves
From The Wharves Of Southport Went Out Men Who Fought Under John Paul Jones Isaac Hull And John Barry — Map (db m27147) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Up This Road
Up this road 2600 British Troops marched July 7th 1779 under command of General Tyron and burned Fairfield — Map (db m27155) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — George Washington Paused Here
George Washington Paused here on the Post Road near this church, on October 16, 1789 and afterward wrote in his diary, "the superb landscape which is to be seen from the meeting house is a rich regalia". In Commemoration Of this historic incident, this tablet has been placed here by friends in this church, October 16, 1932, in this Washington Bicentennial Year. — Map (db m38428) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Putnam Cottage
Putnam Cottage From Here George. Putnam Escaped the British By His Famous Ride Down "Put's Hill" — Map (db m38606) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Putnam's Escape
This Marks The Spot Where On February 26, 1779 General Israel Putnam, Cut Off From His Soldiers And Pursued By British Cavalry, Galloped Down This Rocky Steep And Escaped, Daring To Lead Where Not One Of Many Hundred Foes Dared To Follow. Erected By The Putnam Hill Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Of Greenwich, Conn. A.D. 1900 — Map (db m38607) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — The Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82
The Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82 In the Vicinity French Troops Under Duc De Lauzon Enroute From Newport To Yorktown Encamped During June 29 Through July 1st 1781 Erected by The Sons of the American Revolution Gen. Gold Selleck Silliman Branch Bridgeport, CT — Map (db m26098) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — In Commemoration
1732 ---- 1932 In Commemoration Of The Two Hundredth Birthday Of George Washington ---- Rochambeau Established a Camp Here June 28 To July 1, 1781 ---- Soldiers Commanded By Lafayette Camped At This Spot Placed by Mary Silliman Chapter N.S.D.A.R. — Map (db m26914) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Rochambeau
In This Vicinity French Troops Under Rochambeau Enroute From Yorktown Encamped During October 1782 Erected by This State and The Cyrenius H. Booth Library Cooperating Donated by the Anders Family — Map (db m42367) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteHousatonic Crossing
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Earl Cornwallis and the British army in . . . — Map (db m26915) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Battle of the Rocks Monument
On this historic ground the American Patriots bravely sustained the cause of Liberty against the British Invaders July 12, 1779 ---------- Erected by the D.A.R. of Norwalk 1894. — Map (db m53435) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Burning of Norwalk
From the summit of this hill Maj. Gen. William Tryon witnessed the Burning of Norwalk by the British troops under his command during the engagement of July 11 & 12, 1779. --------------- Erected by Norwalk Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1904 — Map (db m53434) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Fitch’s Point
Here landed The British Troops under the command of Generals Tryon and Garth, Saturday evening, July 10, 1779, preparatory to the
Burning of Norwalk, July 11, 1779. ---------- Marked by Norwalk Chapter, D.A.R. 1899. — Map (db m53437) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Flax Hill Monument
This rock marks the site of a battle between the Americans and British July 12, 1779. This cannon ball was found on the battlefield a hundred years after by the Daughters of the American Revolution 1896 — Map (db m53438) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Liberty Tree Memorial
This American Liberty Elm was named after “The Liberty Tree: Our Country’s first Symbol of Freedom.” On the morning of August 14, 1765, the people of Boston awakened to discover two effigies suspended from an elm tree in protest of the hated Stamp Act. From that day forward that elm became known as “The Liberty Tree.” It stood in silent witness to countless meetings, speeches and celebrations, and became the rallying place for the Sons of Liberty. In August of 1775, as . . . — Map (db m53918) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Parish of St. Paul’s
This Parish of St. Paul’s was founded in 1737 by a missionary priest sent to the colonies from London. The present church building is the fifth erected on this site. The second structure was destroyed by the British on July 11, 1779, when General Tyron ordered the burning of Norwalk. The third church was consecrated by Samuel Seabury, the first bishop of the Episcopal Church in America. The original Altar from this church is situated in the side aisle of the present building. — Map (db m53460) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 3 — “Putnam’s Escape from Horseneck”
This bronze statue was sculpted by renowned local artist Anna Hyatt Huntington. She was 94 when she completed the statue for its 1969 dedication. The bronze depicts General Israel Putnam’s legendary ride down the stone steps in Greenwich (then called “Horseneck”), where he narrowly escaped from the British dragoons who were on a raiding party from New York City. — Map (db m69914) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 12 — Bake Oven and Upper Level Structures — Putnam Memorial State Park
With the exception of the Bake Oven, which produced bread for camp, the identity and locations of numerous other buildings on the upper level is uncertain. We know that the Bake Oven was located in this ravine. It needed water from the stream flowing near it. Other buildings on the upper level: Carpenters, Shoemakers, Taylors, Soap Boilers, Quarter Guards and Sulters. — Map (db m26903) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 11 — Barlow Circle — Putnam Memorial State Park
A resident of Redding, Joel Barlow graduated from Yale in 1778. An accomplished poet and writer, Barlow was thought to have visited the Redding army camps during the winter of 1778-89. He was a chaplain for three years in the Continental Army. — Map (db m26902) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 2 — Camp Guardhouse — Putnam Memorial State Park
Camp Guardhouse A log hut which was reconstructed about 1890 on the remains of a hut from 1778. The actual purpose of the original structure is in question, although local lore said it was the Guardhouse. The construction and size of the hut gives the visitor an approximation of one of the 116 enlisted men’s huts inside the park. Each hut contained 12 soldiers. — Map (db m26893) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 13 — Cemetery / Command Officer’s Quarters — Putnam Memorial State Park
The two mounds of stones inside the square formed by the granite posts, were thought to be the camp cemetery. Accordingly, a memorial marker was erected to mark the site in 1902. Archaeology work has proven this site to be that of a double-ended (two chimneys) officer’s quarters. Further research has pointed to the distinct probability that the hut belonged to Lt. Col. Henry Dearborn. — Map (db m26909) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Charles Burr Todd — Putnam Memorial State Park
This Tablet is Placed by the Commissioners Of Israel Putnam Memorial Camp To Perpetuate the Memory Of Charles Burr Todd 1849 – 1928 Historian and Biographer A Native of Redding, Inspired By Love For His Town And State, He Was a Leader In The Movement To Establish This Memorial Camp Ground September 1931 — Map (db m26898) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 6 — Company Street (Fireback Row) — Putnam Memorial State Park
The enlisted men’s encampment consisted of 116 log huts set in a double row for almost a quarter mile down the company street. The only above ground remains of those huts today are the piles of collapsed stone chimneys. Each stone pile of “fireback” marks the location of a 1778 log hut. The huts were 12x16 feet. Each hut was occupied by twelve soldiers. — Map (db m26896) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Guard House
On this site stood the Guard House of 1778-9. A soldier was shot & killed by the sentry on duty when attempting to escape. — Map (db m12006) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Israel Putnam
Donated A.D. 1969 by sculptress Anna Hyatt Huntington in her 93rd year in timeless memorial to Israel Putnam Senior Major General in the Continental Army who at Greenwich, Connecticut, in February of 1779, made good a dramatic mounted escape from pursuing British Dragoons down the perilous 100 stone steps carved into the precipice at Horse Neck. — Map (db m11994) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 14 — Lake McDougall — Putnam Memorial State Park
The stone dam which makes this pond was installed at the time of the park’s creation. But the stream was in existence during the 1778-79 army encampment. It is one of two main streams, one at either end of the camp, which provided water for the troops. McDougall had been commander of Putnam’s Division prior to going into winter quarters. Gen. Washington placed the division under Putnam and kept McDougall in command of the Hudson Highlands. — Map (db m26910) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 5 — Memorial Monument — Putnam Memorial State Park
Memorial Monument Constructed in 1888, one year after the commissioning of the park, this monument honors the three different camps in Redding during the winter of 1778 – 79. This monument is the very first structure erected at the park. The obelisk is built of native granite and is forty-two feet high with a two foot granite ball on top. — Map (db m26895) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 7 — Museum — Putnam Memorial State Park
This building contains exhibits and historical materials including artifacts unearthed at the campsite during archaeological excavations. The museum was built in 1921. The structure was a repository for the artifacts found in the park. This building replaced the original museum housed on the second floor of the old 1893 Pavilion (today’s Park Visitor Center). — Map (db m26897) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 8 — Officers Quarters — Putnam Memorial State Park
The chimney remains mark the site of a company officer’s hut. The hut was a replica built in 1890 on the original site. The company-level officer’s huts were located behind the enlisted hut line. There are several other firebacks of these junior officers hut remains in the woods behind the enlisted hut line. — Map (db m26899) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 10 — Officers Quarters / Magazine — Putnam Memorial State Park
This structure was reconstructed in 1890 on the foundations of the original 1778 building. Long thought to be an officer’s barracks, recent information is now leading archaeologists to believe that it was actually the camp magazine which held the kegs of gunpowder. The location far away from the troop quarters and being semi-enclosed in the earthen bank support this theory. — Map (db m26901) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 9 — Philips Cave — Putnam Memorial State Park
Local legend says a shallow cave in this rock outcrop was used by one Mr. Philips. Philips was a soldier who returned after the war to live in this cave. He led the life of a lonely hermit, including liberating an occasional chicken, or produce from local farmers. He was evicted by the community. Another version said he was “permanently removed!” — Map (db m26900) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 4 — Putnam Memorial State Park
Putnam Memorial State Park This park commemorates the three winter encampments in 1778 – 79 of Major General Isreal Putnam’s division of Continental Army troops during the Revolutionary War. The memorial park was created on the actual site of one of the three encampments. Gen. Washington positioned his troops in a crescent shape around the British army in NY City. The troops camped in Redding were used to protect the Long Island Sound, the Hudson Highlands and, especially, the . . . — Map (db m26890) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Redding Citizens
In memory of the Redding citizens captured nearby April 26, 1777 & imprisoned in New York for ransom by British General William Tryon & his invading army. Russell Bartlett • Stephen Betts + • Daniel Chapman * • Thomas Couch • David Fairchild • Ezekial Fairchild * • Jabez Frost • Daniel Meeker • Timothy Parsons • Jonas Platt • James Rogers + • Jeremiah Sanford * • Oliver Sanford • Nathaniel Squire * Died Imprisoned           + Selectman and Ned A Redding slave whose ultimate freedom came by . . . — Map (db m69916) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Unknown Heroes
In memory of the Unknown Heroes buried here. — Map (db m11999) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 1 — Visitor Center (1893 Pavilion) — Putnam Memorial State Park
Visitor Center (1893 Pavilion) This building was originally built in 1893 as the park pavilion. It was used as a shelter for park visitors during inclement weather, for dances and picnics. The upstairs was used as the original park museum. The building was dismantled board by board in 2005, and reconstructed into a four-season climate-controlled visitor center. — Map (db m26891) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Winter Quarters of Putnam’s Division
. . . — Map (db m11997) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 9 — Ballard ParkRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Philip Burr Bradley was one of the earliest owners of the property. Bradley, a cousin of Aaron Burr, was placed in command of the Fifth CT Regt. in the Revolutionary War, and commanded a battalion at the Battle of Ridgefield. He also served in the State Legislature, was a Justice of the Peace, the first Postmaster, and a friend of George Washington. Lucius H. Biglow, music publisher and partner in the firm of Biglow & Main in New York City, came here at the urging of his partner who lived . . . — Map (db m24808) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Battle of RidgefieldApril 27, 1777
The Third and Chief Engagement Occurred on This Ridge — Map (db m23395) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Battle of Ridgefield Dead
In defense of American Independence at the Battle of Ridgefield April 27, 1777 died Eight Patriots who were laid in this ground companioned by Sixteen British Soldiers Living, their enemies, Dying their guests, in honor of service and sacrifice this Memorial is placed for the strengthening of hearts. — Map (db m23396) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 22 — Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua KingRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
On September 23, 1780, on his way through American lines to New York City, Major John Andre of the British Army was captured, taken prisoner and brought to American headquarters in South Salem, N.Y. Andre had plotted with General Benedict Arnold to betray the American fortress at West Point and when captured was found to have concealed the plans of West Point in his boot. Lt. Joshua King was given the charge of watching over Andre until he was hanged as a spy on October 2, 1780. Lt. King . . . — Map (db m32002) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Gen. David Wooster
On this spot fell Gen. David Wooster Mortally Wounded April 27,1777, at the Battle of Ridgefield — Map (db m23397) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Keeler Tavern
The Keeler Tavern served as headquarters for the Patriots during the Battle of Ridgefield, April 27, 1777. It is now owned by the Keeler Tavern Preservation Society and maintained as an historical building. — Map (db m23410) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Place Where Wooster Fell
David Wooster, in command of the Conn Troops Born in Stratford March 13, 1711 Mortally wounded April 27, 1777 while defending the liberties of America and nobly died at Danbury May 2, 1777. Give me Liberty of give me death. — Map (db m23431) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 28 — Ridgebury – George Washington Slept HereRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Ridgebury, "The New Patent," was one of the last land purchases made by the Proprietors. Tradition says that the First Congregational Church in Ridgebury had its beginnings in the "New Patent Meeting House" as early as 1738. In 1768 the congregation voted to construct a new church, which was completed in 1769. Services at the Episcopal Church in Ridgebury began at the same time as those in Ridgefield, often sharing the same minister. The building continued to be used, except for the . . . — Map (db m32052) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgebury Congregational Church
Gathered       Built 1760            1851 This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior < Second Plaque: > Connecticut Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route 1780 - 1782 — Map (db m23423) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgefield Veterans Monument
[ west side ] To the Memory of The Citizens of Ridgefield Who Served Their Country In the Wars of the Republic 1775 – 1918 Erected by the People of Ridgefield MCMXXIV [ east side ] War of the Revolution Patrick Ambrose • Amos Baker • Bartholomew Baker • Seth Baker • John Baldwin • John Barns • Wakeman Barrett • Stephen Beers • Abijah Benedict • Daniel Benedict • Darius Benedict • Gamaliel Benedict • Jesse Benedict • John Benedict • Benjamin Bennett • . . . — Map (db m31972) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Battle of RidgefieldApril 27, 1777
The chief engagement of Connecticut’s only inland battle during the War for Independence was fought approximately 100 yards from this site. Several hundred hastily-mustered militia joined a handful of Continental troops under Generals Benedict Arnold and Gold Stilliman to face British regulars more than thrice their number led by Major General William Tryon. Only an hour before, American General David Wooster fell mortally wounded during his second attack on the British rearguard as it . . . — Map (db m23400) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 8 — The Battle of Ridgefield, April 27, 1777Ridgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
British General Tryon’s Raid on Danbury occurred on April 26, 1777. The beginning of the 1777 campaign was the first British invasion and the only pitched battle in Connecticut. Following the burning of Danbury the British troops marched through Ridgefield the next day on their way back to their ships moored at Compo Beach in Westport. The first skirmish, under the leadership of American General David Wooster occurred at the intersection of Barlow Mountain Road and North Salem Road. The . . . — Map (db m23412) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 7 — The Elms Inn and Stebbins HomesteadRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
In 1799, Thomas Rockwell opened a small carpentry shop which later became part of the Elms Inn. It was also a shoemaker’s shop and later, a tin shop operated by Francis Rockwell. Francis was also a vintner whose vineyard was across the street between Catoonah and Gilbert Streets. In 1860 John Rockwell opened the Elm Shade Cottages to serve wealthy New Yorkers arriving to vacation in the country during the summer months. The restaurant and inn still serve the public. Dr. Amos Baker was . . . — Map (db m23435) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Gilbert HouseCirca 1790
Built by Benjamin Stebbins for his daughter Sarah and her husband Amos Baker, a Revolutionary War Hero, the first surgeon in Ridgefield and the originator of the famous Baker Apple. — Map (db m23602) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Original Episcopal Church
Here stood the original Episcopal Church erected in 1740 partly burned by British soldiers during the battle of Ridgefield April 27, 1777 — Map (db m31964) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteRidgefield
French General Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army, just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Lord Cornwallis and the British army in . . . — Map (db m23416) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stamford — Fort Stamford
To mark the site near by of Fort Stamford Built and garrisoned for the defense of the people in these parts in the War for American Independence Erected by Stamford Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Sept. 14, A.D. 1926 < Lower Marker : > Relocated and rededicated by the Stamford Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution October 17, 1999 — Map (db m53431) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stamford — Fort Stamford1781 - 1783
1776           1976       In August, 1781 Gov. Jonathan Trumbull and the Council of Safety ordered construction of fortifications near Stamford to prevent a surprise attack from the enemy. Designed by Col. Rufus Putnam, and erected and garrisoned by Brig. Gen. David Waterbury of Stamford with 700 state troops, Fort Stamford was completed in December, 1781.       In February, 1782 Maj. Hugh Maxwell and a Massachusetts detachment of 150 men were dispatched to man the fort until the arrival in . . . — Map (db m53433) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stamford — Liberty Tree Memorial
This American Liberty Elm was named after “The Liberty Tree: Our Country’s first Symbol of Freedom.” On the morning of August 14, 1765, the people of Boston awakened to discover two effigies suspended from an elm tree in protest of the hated Stamp Act. From that day forward that elm became known as “The Liberty Tree.” It stood in silent witness to countless meetings, speeches and celebrations, and became the rallying place for the Sons of Liberty. In August of 1775, as . . . — Map (db m53765) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stamford — Stamford Veterans Monument
[ inscription around the top ] In Everlasting Memory of Stamford's Patriots 1641 – 1918 [ battle names inscribed in the panel between the fluted columns ] 1689 – 1763 Port Royal • Schenectady • Haverhill • Louisburg • Braddock's Defeat • Duquesne • Quebec 1775 – 1783 Lexington • Concord • Bunker Hill • Ticonderoga • Trenton • Saratoga • Bennington • Yorktown 1812 – 1814 Constitution Guerriere • Lake Erie • Chippewa • Lundy's Lane • Lake . . . — Map (db m38430) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stratford — Old Congregational Burying Ground
[Left Plaque] In honor of the men and women who planted in the wilderness the early homes of Stratford, who fought bravely and suffered patiently in the War of the American Revolution, and who left to their descendents a proud memory of courage, endurance and faith in God. [Right Plaque] 1676   1906 Erected by The Mary Silliman Chapter Daughters of The American Revolution — Map (db m26099) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Stratford — Stratford American Revolutionary War Memorial
American Revolutionary War 1775 –– 1783 Dedicated to the brave Patriots from Stratford who participated in the struggle to achieve our Independence Killed in battle Zachariah Blakeman William Thompson David Wooster “We hold these truths to be self evident That all men are created equal.” — Map (db m25773) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Westport — Battle of Westport Commemoration
To commemorate the battle fought on and near this point between the British forces and the American Patriots, April 28, 1777. Ordnance presented by U.S. Government and erected July 4, 1901 Map (db m22556) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Westport — Compo Beach — Qui Transtulit Sustinet
One Mile South At Compo Beach 2000 British Troops Landed April 25, 1777 For Raid on Danbury — Map (db m21244) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Westport — Disbrow TavernJennings Trail
Jennings Trail Disbrow Tavern Here stood the inn where General Washington stopped for refreshment June 28, 1775 The church was built in 1862. Architect – P. L. Moulnier Westport Historical Society Westport Young Women's League — Map (db m30789) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Westport — First Engagement
Here occurred the first engagement between the Continentals and the British Troops when they invaded Connecticut, April - 25 - 1777 — Map (db m21360) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Westport — MinutemanJennings Trail
To Commemorate the heroism of the Patriots who defended their country when the British invaded this State April 25- 1777. General David Wooster Colonel Abraham Gould and more than one hundred Continentals fell in the engagements commencing at Danbury and closing on Compo Hill — Map (db m21538) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Wilton — Captain Clapp Raymond
Commemorating Captain Clapp Raymond Of the Wilton Militia Who Resided in This House And All Officers and Men Who Served During The War for Independence From the Parish of Wilton, Conn. Presented by Drum Hill Chapter NSDAR 1976 — Map (db m30643) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Wilton — Major Samuel Comstock
In Memory Of Major Samuel Comstock 1739 --- 1824 A Private In The French and Indian War A Captain In The Revolutionary War July 1776 --- June 1783 Serving At White Plains Germantown Fort Mifflin Valley Forge Monmouth Yorktown Commissioned Major October 10, 1783 His Wife Mercy Mead 1741 - 1816 — Map (db m30471) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Wilton — Wilton Veterans Memorial
Wilton Veterans Memorial Honoring Those who served Revolutionary War   1775 – 1784 War of 1812   1812 – 1814 Mexican War   1846 – 1848 Civil War   1861 1865 Spanish – American War   1989 – 1902 World War I   1917 – 1918 World War II   1941 – 1946 Korean Conflict   1950 – 1955 Vietnam War   1964 – 1973 Dedicated Memorial Day 1988 by The American Legion James B. Whipple Post 86 and Rotary Club of . . . — Map (db m32254) WM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Bristol — Bristol Revolutionary War Plaque
In Memory Of The Revolutionary War Patriots Who Sacrificed Their Lives And Fortune For Their Country Placed By Katherine Gaylord Chapter Daughters Of The American Revolution 1964 — Map (db m33517) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Bristol — Nathan Hale
[ east side ] Nathan Hale 1755 – 1776 The Connecticut Patriot Whose Last Words Were I Only Regret That I Have But One Life To Lose For My Country [ south side ] Erected in Memory Of Henry G. Bartley   1922-1944 Edward L. Froehlich    1921-1944 Dudley S. Ingraham Jr.   1924-1945 Alan T. Johnson   1926-1945 Benjamin P. Joy   1919-1944 Norman E. Wasley   1924-1943 They Too Gave Their Lives — Map (db m34243) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Elmwood — Burgoyne Elms
A group of elm trees formerly stood in a small triangle in the intersection of Quaker Lane South and New Britain Avenue, the old south road to Farmington. Ebenezer Faxon and other residents in southern West Hartford planted the elm saplings to celebrate the surrender of British General Burgoyne to American General Gates at Saratoga, New York, in October, 1777. The trees grew to great size, lived for many years, and suggested the name Elmwood for the neighborhood. When they were removed, the . . . — Map (db m66286) HM WM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Elmwood — Burgoyne RestDedicated June 1, 1961
Through the dedicated efforts of the Elmwood Business Associates and the West Hartford Lions Club, this park was established where the great stand of elms, from which Elmwood took its name, once grew. They were planted to commemorate the victory of the Patriots, many of whom were from West Hartford, over British General John Burgoyne at Saratoga in 1777. — Map (db m66287) HM WM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Farmington — Lest We Forget
Lest We Forget In honor and grateful remembrance of our French Allies in the Revolution, whose army, under the command of General Count de Rochambeau, marched past this spot enroute from Newport and Providence, R.I., to join General Washington on the Hudson River in 1791, and again on its return from Yorktown, Va. To Boston, Mass., in 1782. The main body of about 4000 men was composed of the Regiments of Bourbonais, Royal Deux-Ponts, Soissonnais and Saint Once, and the artillery. The . . . — Map (db m33769) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Farmington — Rochambeau Route 1781-82
Rochambeau Route 1781-82 In This Vicinity French Troops Under Rochambeau Entoute From Yorktown Encamped During October 1782 Erected By The State And Farmington Historical Society Cooperating — Map (db m33012) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Capt. Pownal Deming
[ east side ] Deming In Memory Of Capt. Pownal Deming Son Of David Deming & Mehitable Champion Born Sept. 30, 1749 Died April 9, 1795 [ west side ] An earnest patriot, he enlisted in the Continental Army at the Lexington Alarm, April 1775, and served with distinction through the War for Independence He was an original member of the Society of the Cincinnati. [ north side ] In Memory Of Abigail Hubbell Deming Wife Of Capt. Pownal Deming . . . — Map (db m44066) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Col. Thomas Knowlton
In Memory Of Col. Thomas Knowlton Of Ashford Conn. Who as a boy served in several campaigns in the French and Indian Wars Shared in the siege and capture of Havana in 1762 Was in immediate command of Connecticut troops at the Battle of Bunker Hill Was with his commands closely attached to the person of Washington And was killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights September 16 1776 At the age of thirty-six — Map (db m52189) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — General Casimir Pulaski
Pulaski "I came here, where freedom is being defended, to serve it, and to live or die for it . . ." General Casimir Pulaski was born in Poland in 1748. He led the unsuccessful revolt of Polish Patriots against Russia. Upon arrival in America he joined General George Washington's Army. Having distinguished himself in the battle of Brandywine, Congress appointed him a Brigadier General. He organized the independent Corps of Cavalry and Infantry, known as the Pulaski Legion. General Casimir . . . — Map (db m52343) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — George Washington
George Washington Where You Are Standing On September 20, 1780 Waits General George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the American Armies During the American Colonies' Revolution Against Great Britain. He has come with Governor Trumbull and Connecticut's Patriots to greet the French Armies under Rochambeau, Admiral de Tirney, de Grasse and La Fayette. The two armies form an alliance that will bring about an independent United States of America. This place marks the . . . — Map (db m52783) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Homesite of Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth
Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth SAR Branch Connecticut Erected MCMXIII Here stood the home of Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth Commissary General of the American forces in the War for Independence and a trusted friend of George Washington and "Brother Jonathan Trumbull" Here in 1775 he entertained Washington on his way to Cambridge to assume command of the Continental Army In the southwest chamber Washington met the French Commander Count de Rochambeau and others in May 1781 and considered the plan of . . . — Map (db m52427) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Jonathan Trumbull
Jonathan Trumbull Where You Are Standing From 1768 to 1784 Jonathan Trumbull guides the people of Connecticut to independence as the colony's Royal Governor. Governor Trumbull is the only colonial governor to stand with the patriots during the American Revolution. He organizes the energy and ingenuity of her citizens to make the weapons, the food and clothing for George Washington's Continental Army, thus earning Connecticut the honored title of "The Provisioning State" . . . — Map (db m52782) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Maj. Thomas Y. Seymour
Maj. Thomas Y. SeymourThis plaque and the renaming of this bridge honor the Revolutionary War hero and distinguished citizen of Connecticut, Thomas Y. Seymour. Seymour, who later rose to the rank of Major in the Continental Army, was born June 19, 1757, the eldest child of the Hon. Thomas Seymour, the first Mayor of Hartford. After graduating from Yale in 1777, the son was given a commission in the Second Continental Regiment of Light Dragoons. Under the command of General. Horatio Gates and . . . — Map (db m52560) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Marquis De La Fayette
To the Marquis De La Fayette, born September 6, 1757, died May 20, 1834. A true friend of Liberty, who served as a Major General in the Continental Army with “all possible zeal, without any special pay or allowances” until the American colonists secured their freedom, and whose frequent visits to this State, as Aide to Washington, as Liaison Officer with supporting French troops, and in the pursuit of freedom, are gratefully remembered. This Plaque is dedicated . . . — Map (db m3888) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Marquis de La Fayette
Marquis de La Fayette Where You Are Standing On September, 1824 Arrives the Marquis de La Fayette in Daniel Wadsworth's carriage drawn by four white horses. Hartford's citizens shout hurrahs, wave banners and throw garlands of flowers at the feet of this revered hero of the American Revolution. Veterans believe it was this noble Frenchman's armies that secured Connecticut's coastline and forced Lord Cornwallis' defeat at Yorktown. Passing through the evergreen archways, La Fayette is . . . — Map (db m43767) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — The First Meeting of Washington and Rochambeau
This tablet commemorates the historic first meeting of General George Washington and General Comte de Rochambeau, commander-in-chief of the French army in America, which took place September 20, 1780. On that occasion and in a subsequent meeting the following May, was developed the strategy which resulted, at Yorktown, in victory and independence for the American Colonies. Erected by the City of Hartford, September 20, 1946, in grateful rembrance "Upon their appearance in the city, . . . — Map (db m52914) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Hartford French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau's troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington's Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and . . . — Map (db m43739) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Marion — Rochambeau
Rochambeau Lieut. General Commanding The Auxiliary French Armies Under Washington July 10, 1780     Jan 11, 1783 Rochambeau's letter to Congress "We are your brothers. We shall conduct ourselves as such with you. We shall fight against our enemies at your side as one and the same nation" Quotation from General's letter [ back ] General Rochambeau and 6000 French forces under his command camped here in June 1781 They then continued their march through . . . — Map (db m33706) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), New Britain — Brig. Gen. Casimir Pulaski
Erected By The Citizens of New Britain In memory of Brig. Gen. Casimir Pulaski "Father of Our Cavalry" Born in Poland Killed in the Battle Of Savannah, Ga. Died 1779 --- 1929 U.S. Congress Declared October 11th as Pulaski Day — Map (db m41632) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), New Britain — Brig. Gen. John Patterson House
About Thirty Feet from this Spot Stood the House in Which Brig. Gen. John Patterson Was Born in 1743 - 4 Member of two Provincial Congresses from Lenox Mass. Leader in the War of Independence Distinguished Jurist and Member of Congress from Lisle N.Y. Where He Died in 1808 — Map (db m41611) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), New Britain — Tadeusz Kosciuszko
Born 1746   Died 1817 Brigadier General Tadeusz Kosciuszko Born in Poland 1746. Fought in Revolutionary War 'Engineers' at Saratoga, New York, Charleston, Yorktown, erected fortifications at West Point Colonel and Adjutant to George Washington. Congress, on 1783, for his services, made him a brigadier general and extended him full citizenship of the United States. Freedom Shreiked When Kosciuszko Died — Map (db m41633) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Plantsville — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Southington French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and vaval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau's troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington's Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Earl Cornwallis and . . . — Map (db m33770) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Southington — Near This Spot
Near This Spot Stood The First Meeting House of This Town From 1726 – 1757 This Stone Is Also A Memorial To Our Revolutionary Soldiers Erected By Hanna Woodruff Chapter D. A. R. — Map (db m34236) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Southington — Southington Veterans Memorial
[ south side ] This Tablet Is Dedicated To Those Brave Men From The Town Of Southington Who Served The United States In The Revolutionary War, The War Of 1812, The Mexican War And The Spanish War Revolutionary War 1775 – 1783 Oliver Adams • Charles Adkins • Chauncey Adkins • Samuel Adkins • Thomas Adkins • Amos Andrews Jr. • Capt. Obadiah Andrews • Ezekial Andrews • Gideon Andrews • Ichabod Andrews • Jonathan Andrews • Lieut. David Andrews • Ozias Andrews • Samuel . . . — Map (db m33755) WM
Connecticut (Hartford County), West Hartford — Connecticut Veterans Memorial West Hartford
Connecticut Veterans Memorial West Hartford The Connecticut Veterans Memorial was commisioned by the Town Council of West Hartford in June 2001. This memorial honors West Hartford men and women who gave their lives during war. The black granite Wall of Peace is engraved with the names of local fallen heroes. The spiraling Wall of Peace is broken each time the United States entered war. The Walk of Remembrance, encircling the Wall of Peace, contains the names of men and women from across . . . — Map (db m53159) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Wethersfield — Home of Silas Deane
Home of Silas Deane American Diplomat In the Revolution Built 1766 — Map (db m46104) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Wethersfield — Society of the Cincinnati
This Plaque is Dedicated by The Society of the Cincinnati to General George Washington Wo Was Its First President. Samuel Blatchley Webb Who Grew Up In This Home The Comte De Rochambeau Who Visited Here and The Marquis De Lafayette; All Of Whom Were Original Members of the Society — Map (db m46146) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Wethersfield — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Wethersfield French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and . . . — Map (db m46299) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Wethersfield — Webb House
Webb House Here Washington and Rochambeau Planned The Campaign Ending At Yorktown, 1781 — Map (db m46106) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Barkhamsted — Barkhamsted Soldiers Memorial
[ north side ] 1776 The Tribute Of The People Of Barkhamsted To The Memory Of Her Sons And Daughters Who Fought To Establish Defend And Preserve The Nation --- Erected 1897 [ lower plaque ] World War II Jespersen, Donald • Jones, Edward E. • Kaiser, Herbert J. • Kelly, Harold M. • Lauff, John • Lavender, Charles • Lavieri, Carmine E. • Lavieri, Carmine R. • LeGeyt, Charles H. Jr. • LeGeyt, Henry A. • Lemioux, Edgar • Lemioux, Girard • . . . — Map (db m29847) WM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Bethlehem — Bethlehem Revolutionary War Memorial
In memory of the citizens of Bethlehem who fought for the defense of our rights and the independence of our country 1776 – 1781 Andrew Martin, Capt. • Enos Hawlley, Lieut. • Nat’h Chapman, Ens • Alex’ Kasson, Clerk • John Steel, Sergt. • John Porter, Drum. • James Kasson • Archibald Kasson • James Hooker • Thomas Thomson • James Hannah • Jacob Frisby • David Ambler • David Leavitt • William Martin • Jacob Baldwin • Archibald Dixson • James Stilson • Thomas Doolittle • . . . — Map (db m26561) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), East Canaan — East Canaan Veterans Monument
[ north side ] This Memorial Was Erected By The Citizens & Friends of East Canaan Conn 1928 [ west side ] In Memory Of Those Who Answered Their Country's Call 1917 – 1918 [ east side ] In Memory Of Those Who Defended Their Country 1776 – 1812 1865 - 1898 — Map (db m41853) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Goshen — Goshen French and Indian War & Revolutionary War Memorial
[ front ] Dedicated To Our Comrades Of Goshen Who Established And Maintained Freedom For Our Country French And Indian War 1754 - 1763 Dibble, Joel • Doud, John • Gaylord, Timothy • Humphrey, Ashbel • Humphrey, Manna • Humphrey, Unknown • Lee, Daniel • Munson, John • North, Elisha • Reeve, Benjamin • Richards, Charles • Royce, Josiah • Stanley, Nathaniel, Jr. • Tuttle, Stephen • Wilcox, John Jr. • Wilcox, Moses • Wilcox, Thomas • Winchell, Munson • Wright, John Revolutionary . . . — Map (db m30231) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), New Milford — New Milford
Front This beautiful valley known to the Potatuck Indians as Weantinock, was purchased from them in 1703 by a company of individuals chiefly from Milford, Connecticut, hence the name New Milford. Its earliest white inhabitant, Zachariah Ferriss, arrived in 1706, followed in 1707 by the first permanent settlers, John Noble, his daughter Sarah, and John Bostwick. The area, originally a plantation, was incorporated with the first twelve families in 1712 as the forty-seventh Connecticut . . . — Map (db m22750) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), North Canaan — North Canaan Veterans Monument
[ east side ] This Tablet Is Reverently Inscribed to the Memory Of Those Who Went From That Part Of The Town of Canaan Which Later Became North Canaan, And Who, With Valor and Patriotism, Defended the Flag of Our Country In The Colonial Wars The War of The Revolution The War of 1812 Although time has dimmed the record of their Names, their deeds are held in everlasting Remembrance [ west side ] 1861   In Memory   1865 Of These Men of North Canaan . . . — Map (db m42098) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Roxbury — Col. Seth Warner Monument
North Face:Col. Seth Warner of the Army of the Revolution Born in Roxbury, CT May 17, 1743 A resident of Bennington, VT from 1765 to 1784 Died in his native parish Dec 25, 1784 West Face:Captor of Crown Point Commander of the Green Mountain Boys in the repulse of Carlton at Longueil and in the Battle of Hubbardton and the associate of Stark in the victory at Bennington East Face:Distinguished as a successful defender of the New Hampshire Grants and for Bravery . . . — Map (db m20320) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Roxbury — Roxbury Veterans Monument
The Town of Roxbury Honors Her Sons & Daughters Who Served During Times of War World War I John Francis Acton • Percy Peck Beardsley • John Milo Bolt • John Grimes Butler • Robert Callahan • Harold Collins • John H. Collins • Richard W. Collins • John Leo Daly • Frank Emerson • Francis J. Fanning • Sherry E. Fry • John Hersey Humphrey II • Charles Ray Innous • Hubert Oliver Johnson • Harry Arthur Larson • Dana T. Leavenworth • Raymond Leavenworth • Joseph Loretz • Frank D. Lowitz • . . . — Map (db m43513) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Sharon — Sharon Veterans Monument
Revolutionary War Abel David • Abel Sluman • Abel William • Ackley Ariel • Ackley David • Ackley Jude • Ackley Thomas Jr • Ady Thomas • Allen Amos • Allen Ichabod • Ames Samuel • Andrews Abraham • Avery Daniel • Avery William • Bailey Joseph • Baker Joseph • Baley Joseph • Bardslee John • Barnes Daniel • Barnes Jacob • Barnes Jonas • Barnes Thomas • Barrows Amos • Barrows Joseph • Barto John • Basley Joseph • Bates Charles • Bates John • Beatts Hezekiah • Bemon Mathew • Benjamin Phineas • . . . — Map (db m58331) WM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Thomaston — Thomaston Revolutionary Soldiers
Thomaston Revolutionary Soldiers Asha Blaksley David Jessie Humiston Daniel Potter, Lieut. Samuel Reynolds Ezekiel Sanford, Ens. Daniel Sanford, Lieut. John Sutliffe, Capt. Benjam Welton Erected By Bicentennial Committee — Map (db m28141) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Torrington — Torrington Veterans Memorial
This Memorial Records The Devotion Of The Sons And Daughters Of Torrington Who In The Hour Of Need Gave Their Services To Their Country Putting Honor And Duty Above Safety They Sought Not Glory But The Good Of Their Country And Humanity Erected By The Grateful City And People Of Torrington — Map (db m30459) WM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Watertown — Michael DaytonCaptain of Connecticut
Revolutionary War Soldier Michael Dayton Captain of Connecticut Born June 4, 1722 Died Sept. 22, 1776 Placed by Sarah Whitman Trumbull Chapter NSDAR   May 1996 — Map (db m31164) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Watertown — Soldiers of 1776 Memorial
[ marker on the left column ] Soldiers of 1776 Ensign Theophilus Baldwin Col. Aner Bradley Benaja Bryan David Buckingham Thomas Cole Younglove Cutler Samuel Dayton Dr. John Elton Jonathan Garnsey Capt. Joseph Garnsey Ashbel Loveland Capt. Isaac Merriman Joash Seymour Capt. Josiah Seymour Ensign John Stoddard Erected By The Sarah Whitman Trumbull Chapter D.A.R. 1910 [ marker on the right column ] Soldiers of 1776 Asel . . . — Map (db m26473) HM
Connecticut (Litchfield County), Winsted — Winchester Revolutionary War Memorial
In Grateful Remembrance Of the Soldiers of the American Revolution Who Are Buried In The Town Of Winchester Stephen Wade • Ozias Bronson • Wail Loomis • John Dare • Richard Coit • Moses Hatch • Roswell Grant • Oliver Coe • Solomon Wheadon • Joel Roberts • Robert McEwen • Eliphaz Alvord • Ichabod Loomis • Daniel Hurlbut Cone • Josiah Everett • Silliman Hubbell • Samuel Hurlbut • Nathaniel Hoyt • Thomas Spencer • Timothy Benedict • Abram Andrews • Phineas Griswold • Daniel Andrews • Reuben . . . — Map (db m29901) HM
Connecticut (Middlesex County), Essex — Warship Oliver Cromwell
Here Was Built The Oliver Cromwell Connecticut Warship In the Revolution 1776 — Map (db m65667) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Ansonia — American Liberty Elm
American Liberty Elm Dedicated by the Derby Historical Society July 10, 2002 on the 250th Anniversary of the Birth of General David Humphreys 1752 – 1818 Sponsored by The City of Ansonia — Map (db m25567) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Ansonia — Birthplace of David Humphreys
Birthplace of David Humphreys 1752 – 1818, Soldier, Poet, Diplomat, Industrial Pioneer — Map (db m25563) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Ansonia — Pork Hollow
Pork Hollow. Near this spot where hidden military stores belonging to the army of the Revolution during Tryon’s raid through Connecticut. — Map (db m29526) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Cheshire — Cheshire Revolutionary War Monument
To Commemorate the Service of All the Patriotic Men of Cheshire Who Served In the American Revolution 1775 – 1783 Placed by Lady Fenwick Chapter No. 48 Daughters of the American Revolution And the Town of Cheshire 1965 Map (db m22404) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Cheshire — Town of Cheshire Memorial Plaza
Honoring Our Veterans 1754 French and Indian War 1763 Reuben Hitchcock • Edward Parker • Ephraim Parker 1775 Revolutionary War 1783 Asa Bellamy • Justus Bellamy • Reuben Bellamy • Silas Bellamy • Asa Bronson • Elisha Cowles • Amos Parker • Edward Parker • Elisha Parker • Samuel Parker • Elisha Parker, Jr. • Jesse Parker, Jr. • Jesse Parker, Sr.* 1861 Civil War 1865 Nelson Beach 1940 World War II 1946 Francis R. Rocco 1950 Korea 1955 Roger (Deschesnes) Deshane • . . . — Map (db m22406) WM
Connecticut (New Haven County), East Haven — East Haven Veterans Memorial
This Tribute To The Worth of Her Sons Who Have By Land and Sea Offered Their Lives In Defense of Their Country Is Erected by The Citizens of East Haven Dedicated 1911 Rededicated 1990 By East Haven Historical Society and Economic Development Commission [ west side ] American Revolution, 1775-83 Nathan Andrews • Abijah Bradley • Asa Bradley • Zabulon Bradley • Edward Goodsell • Jared Heminway • John Howe* • Isaac Luddington • Isaac Pardee • Jacob Pardee Jr. • Richard . . . — Map (db m35557) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), East Haven — Marquis de Lafayette Encampment
Marquis de Lafayette 1757   1834 General in the Continental Army Camped Here With 2800 Troops Enroute to Rhode Island July 26 and 27, 1778 dedicated here by CT Society Sons of the American Revolution General David Humphries Branch and The East Haven Historical Society 1996 — Map (db m35581) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Guilford — Guilford Revolutionary War Memorial
In Memory Of All The Revolutionary Soldiers Of Guilford, Connecticut. Placed By Agnes Dickinson Lee Chapter Daughters Of The American Revolution 1940 — Map (db m57224) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Madison — Patriots of Madison1776-1783
Erected in memory of all patriots of Madison (then east Guilford) who served in the War of Independence that this nation might be free. — Map (db m66460) HM WM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Meriden — Count Casimir Pulaski
[Plaque on the south side]: Count Casimir Pulaski “Father of the American Cavalry” Born in Poland 1747; came to America 1777, entering as a volunteer; distinguished himself at Battle of Brandywine, promoted to the Rank of Brigadier General. Was mortally wounded in the seige of Savannah, Georgia. He died 1779. Freedom shrieked when Pulaski Died. [Inscription on the north side]: Casimir Pulaski Polish – American Patriot Aided the . . . — Map (db m26589) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Meriden — The Patriots
The Patriots whose names this tablet bears and whose remains rest in this burial ground assisted in establishing American independence by their wervice in the War of the American Revolution Archelaus Allen • Stephen Atwater • James Baldwin • Jared Benham • Captain Divan Berry • Captain Daniel Collins • Captain John Couch • Brenton Hall • Benjamin Hart • Insign Hough, M.D. • Phineas Hough • Captain Bezaliel Ives • Gideon Ives • Captain Samuel Ives • Israel Johnson • Phineas Lyman • . . . — Map (db m26588) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Middlebury — Middlebury Veterans Memorial
Middlebury Honors Those Who Have Served In The Wars Of Their Country French – Indian War Abner Munson Revolutionary War David Abbott, Benjamin Bemont, Aaron Benedict, Enos Benham, Samuel Benham, Edward Blackman, Michael Bowers, Asahel Bronson, Elijah Bronson, Isaac Bronson, Andrew Clark, Daniel Clark, Benjamin Fenn, Samuel Fenn, Israel Frisbie, Stephen Hawley, Reuben Hickox, Timothy Higgins, Benjamin Hine, Justus Johnson, Simeon Manvil, Augustus Peck, Gideon Platt, James . . . — Map (db m29503) WM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Middlebury — Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82
In this vicinity French Troops under Rochambeau enroute to Yorktown encamped during June 1781 Erected by the state and Mattatuck Branch, Sons Amer. Rev. Cooperating — Map (db m19690) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Milford — A Connecticut Minuteman’s Homestead
A Connecticut Minuteman’s Homestead At 139 North Street lived Revolutionary War “Minuteman” John Downs (1745 – 1819). A “minuteman” was a patriot who, with the local militia, would respond quickly to an alarm. With musket in-hand they were ready “in a minute” to defend against attacks. From a diar he wrote in every day for 47 years (1763 to 1810), which still exists today, Downs recorded that he answered the call of duty several times during the . . . — Map (db m56917) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Milford — Liberty Rock
History of Liberty Rock Liberty Rock as we call it today was one known as “Hog Rock”. With a little imagination, the rock appears to be in the shape of a hog. Somewhere in the rock can be found the imprint of a hog’s foot. The site served as a lookout post and signal station. From Liberty Rock, Milford patriots watched the Housatonic River, then called the Stratford River, to guard against invasion by British forces during the Revolutionary War. The Spot was the highest . . . — Map (db m26308) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Beacon Hill
On this spot a signal beacon was established in 1775 and about this hill American patriots bravely resisted a large force of invading British troops July 5, 1779 To honor the deeds of the Fathers Rising above the location of this sign stands Beacon Hill. In 1775 a large pile of brush and firewood was placed on top of Beacon Hill ready to be set on fire as a beacon light to warn of an enemy approach. On July 4, 1779 British troops were sighted in Long Island Sound heading . . . — Map (db m35735) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Black Rock Fort
Black Rock Fort Here on July 5, 1779, eighteen men under Lieutenant Daniel Bishop stood in defense of New Haven against a British fleet commanded by Commodore Sir George Collier and land forces commanded by Major General William Tryon. When ammunition ran out the Patriots spiked their guns and withdrew. — Map (db m35730) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Defenders' Monument
Here July 5, 1779 citizens of New Haven with cannon prevented an invading British Army from crossing West River and thereby saved the town from destruction — Map (db m17289) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — deLauzun Encampment
Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82 In this vicinity French Troops under deLauzun enroute to Yorktown encamped during June 1781 Erected by the State and Wallingford Historical Society Cooperating — Map (db m35311) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Fort Nathan HaleBlack Rock Fort
Fort Nathan Hale Black Rock Fort Entered the National Register of Historic Places October 28, 1970 — Map (db m35726) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Fort Wooster ParkThe Quinnipiac Tribe
Fort Wooster Park Sacred grounds of the Quinnipiac Indians and one of the earliest reservations in the New World Battle site of the American patriots against the British forces during the invasion of New Haven on July 5, 1779 Location of a hilltop beacon to warn of approaching enemy ships during the War of 1812, site of earthen ramparts and a black powder cellar The Quinnipiac Tribe This coastal Algonquian tribe numbered about 250 members when the English colonists arrived in 1638. They . . . — Map (db m35538) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — In Honor of Captain Nathan Hale
In Honor Of Captain Nathan Hale 1755 – 1776 Patriot – Soldier – Martyr I Only Regret That I Have But One Life To Lose For My Country — Map (db m35727) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Nathan Hale
[ front ] Nathan Hale 1755 – 1776 Class of 1773 [ back ] A Gift to Yale College By Graduates and Friends Anno Domini MCMXIV [ inscribed around the bronze base of the statue ] I Only Regret That I Have But One Life To Lose For My Country — Map (db m34840) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Near This Spot
Near this spot a portion of the British troops under Gen. Tryon of New York landed July 5, 1779 intending to burn New Haven. The opposing force became so large that the British retreated to their boats on July 7. — Map (db m28098) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Patriots of New Haven Memorial
This Memorial Commemorates The Determined Resistance Near This Spot Of The Patriots of New Haven Against The British Invasion Under Maj. Gen. Tryon of New York July 5, 1779 — Map (db m35734) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Society of The Cincinnati Memorial
Erected By The Society of The Cincinnati In the State of Connecticut In Memory Of Captain Judah Alden • Captain Samuel Allyn • Captain Simeon Allyn • Ensign Daniel Avery • Lieutenant Eienezer Avery • Captain Elijah Avery • Captain Esisa Avery • Captain Remember Baker • Lieutenant David Barber • Lieutenant Silas Benham • Captain Stephen Brown • Lieutenant Asahel Buck • Lieutenant Jonathan Buck • Captain Hubbard D. Burrows • Major James Chapman • Lieutenant Richard Chapman • Lieutenant . . . — Map (db m35729) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), New Haven — Soldiers and Sailors Monument
[ inscription on the west face of the base ] Gettysburg • Port Hudson • Fort Fisher • 1861-1865 [ inscription on the east face of the base ] Bunker Hill • Bennington • Saratoga • 1775-1783 [ inscription on the south face of the base ] Lake Erie • Lake Champlain • New Orleans • 1812-1815 [ inscription on the north face of the base ] Palo Alto • Molino Del Rey • Chapultepec • 1846-1848 [ west plaque ] 1861 1865 Soldiers . . . — Map (db m34723) WM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Northford — Northford Veterans Monument
Erected In 1920 By The Society Of Northford In Honor Of Her Sons Who Answered Their Country's Call 1776 Revolutionary War 1783 Ambrose Baldwin • John Baldwin • Phineas Baldwin • Samuel Bartholomew • Dan Bartholomew • Jacob Bunnell • Nathaniel Bunnell • Joseph Bunnell • Jairius Bunnell • Stephen Cook • Titus Cook • Aaron Cooke • Caleb Cooke • Samuel Cooke • Col. William Douglas • John Elwell • Peter Farnam • Jonathan Finch • Isaac Foote • Elihu Foote • Edwin Foote • Josiah Fowler • Josiah . . . — Map (db m35654) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Orange — Orange Veterans Monument
Amerigion Legion   Post 127 In Memory Of The Veterans Of The War of Independence War of 1812 Civil War Spanish American War World War I World War II Korean War Vietnam War — Map (db m27723) WM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Prospect — Prospect Soldiers' Monument
[ West plaque ] Prospect 1906 To the Loyal Sons Of Prospect Who Served in the Wars Of Our Country “The noblest motive Is the public good.” [ South plaque ] Our World War Veterans Beers, Harry J. Berglund, Reuben W. Blanning, Howard A. Boardman, Henry D. Burnham, Henry N. Coer, Richard W. Hager, Fred Hotchkiss, Edward D. Huckins, Raymond F. Morse, W. Ronald Moshier, Charles C. Neumaier, Charles Nichols, Robert H.H. Nichols, Russell B. Nichols, Edward A. Jr. . . . — Map (db m22519) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Seymour — Seymour Revolutionary War Memorial
1775 1783 Revolutionary War Baldwin, James • Baldwin, Jesse • Bassett, Abraham • Butler, Ezra • Canfield, Abiel • Canfield, Daniel • Chapman, Reuban • Foot, Ezra • Gillette, Jeremah • Holbrook, Abel • Holbrook, Daniel Col. • Holbrook, Daniel Capt. • Humphries, John General • Johnson, Gideon • Johnson, Hezekiah • Johnson, Isaac • Johnson, Joel • Johnson, Joseph • Johnson, Samuel • Keeney, William • Leach, James • Lewis, Philo • Lounsbury, Jarvis • Loveland, Truman • Mansfield, Nathan • . . . — Map (db m27416) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Southbury — Rochambeau Route 1781-82
In 1781 and 1782 Jean Baptiste Count de Rochambeau and his French Troops marched by here enroute to and from Yorktown, Va. — Map (db m6429) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Southbury — Where Rochambeau Crossed the Housatonic River1781   *   1954
Near this point Le Comte de Rochambeau crossed the Housatonic River leading the French Army enroute to victory at Yorktown. — Map (db m6432) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Wallingford — Wallingford Revolutionary War Memorial
Dedicated to the Men Who Served The Town of Wallingford In The American Revolution — Map (db m30092) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Waterbury — Memorial To Two French Soldiers
1781   1914 This memorial was erected by Patriotic Citizens and Statesmen to commemorate two French Soldiers of Rochambeau's Army who volun- teered to fight for American Indepen- dence under Washington, enroute from Newport to Yorktown, died and were buried here, 1781. Contributors Govs. Baldwin, Conn. Dunne, Ill. (native of Waterbury) Glynn, N.Y. McGovern, Wis. McCreary, Ky. U.S. Senators of Conn. F.B. Brandegee, G.P. McLean, Senator Irving H. Chase, Conn. . . . — Map (db m36024) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Waterbury — Revolutionary War Tercentennial Memorial
A Tercentennial Memorial to all American Revolutionary War soldiers buried in this cemetery — Map (db m23601) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Waterbury — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Waterbury, Middlebury, Southbury French General Jean Baptiste Donation de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War fot Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau's troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington 's Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the . . . — Map (db m36023) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), West Haven — Adjutant William Campbell
Adjutant William Campbell Fell During The British Invasion Of New Haven July 5, 1779 Blessed Are The Merciful — Map (db m28283) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), West Haven — Bradley Point Park
Bradley Point Park On July 5, 1779, British invasion forces under the command of Brigadier General Garth landed on this spot. Dedicated – July 5, 1984 City of West Haven Lawrence C. Minichino Mayor Plaque Donated By The Eve Lear Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution — Map (db m27868) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), West Haven — British Landing Site
At this historic spot, on July 5, 1779 during the American Revolution Brigadier General Garth, with his First Division landed with 1000 British soldiers and marched up Savin Avenue to the Green. Harriet C. North City Historian Donated by Lions Club of West Haven November 8, 1986 — Map (db m27955) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), West Haven — West Haven Revolutionary War Memorial
In Memory Of These Men Of West Haven Who As Soldiers, Sailors And Patriots Served The Cause In The American Revolution 1775 – 1783 Silas Benham • David Clinton • David Johnson • Agrippa Smith • Alling Smith • Chauncey Smith • Thaddeus Smith • Elijah Stevens • Thomas Tillinghast • Deliverance Painter • Samuel Trowbridge • David Trowbridge • John Catlin • Nathan Catlin • Eunice Ruslear • Samuel Smith • Silas Smith Their Resting Places Are Known Only To God — Map (db m27971) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Wolcott — Kenea Soldiers Monument
Presented to The Town of Wolcott by Leverett Dwight Kenea In Memory of the Soldiers Who Fought In The War of the Revolution The War of 1812 and The Civil War A.D. 1916 — Map (db m22369) WM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Col. William Ledyard
On this spot Col. William Ledyard fell by his own sword in the hands of a British officer to whom he had surrendered in the massacre of Fort Griswold, Sept. 6, 1781. — Map (db m18048) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Covered Way
A pathway between the fort and the lower battery where soldiers using it were under cover from enemy gunfire. — Map (db m19053) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Death of Major William Montgomery
The death of Major William Montgomery while leading the British attack on the Fort at this point. Sept. 6th 1781 — Map (db m18049) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Defenders of Fort Griswold • Sept • 6th 1781 •
British Officer - “Who commands this fort ” Colonel Ledyard – “I did sir, but you do now ” Killed – Lieut. Col. William Ledyard, Commanding Capt. Elijah Avery • Capt. Elisha Avery • Lieut. Ebenezer Avery • Ensign Daniel Avery • Serg. Jasper Avery • Serg. Solomon Avery • David Avery • Thomas Avery • Capt. Samuel Allyn • Capt. Simeon Allyn • Belton Allyn • Benadam Allyn • Nathaniel Adams • Capt. Hubbard Burrows • Serg. Ezekiel Bailey • . . . — Map (db m19584) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Groton
As part of New London Plantation, Groton was settled in 1646 by John Winthrop, the younger, and a band of Puritans from Massachusetts. The town separated from New London in 1705, and was named for the Winthrop manor in England. One of the last battles of the American Revolution was fought on Groton Heights at Fort Griswold. September 6, 1781. The Groton Monument commemorates the battle. A state park now preserves the fort area. Groton is the site of the Submarine Base of the United States Navy, . . . — Map (db m66439) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Groton Battle Monument
The monument was erected under the patronage of the State of Connecticut, A. D. 1830, and in the 55th year of the Independence of the U. S. A. in memory of the brave Patriots, who fell in the Massacre at Fort Griswold, near this spot, on the 6th of Sept. A. D. 1781, when the British, under the command of the traitor, Benedict Arnold, burnt the towns of New London and Groton, and spread desolation and woe throughout this region. — Map (db m18050) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Patriot Prisoners
In honor of the 38 Patriots who were carried as prisoners in boats to New York from this shore after the Battle of Groton Heights September 6, 1781 — Map (db m18053) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Site of Ye Ebenezer Avery House
Shelterwas afforded our wounded and dying soldiers within this house after the massacre at Ft. Griswold Sept. 6, 1781 Moved in 1971 to Ft. Griswold State Battlefield Park — Map (db m19050) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — The Battle of Groton HeightsStabilization and Preservation of Fort Griswold — Phase 1
On the morning of September 6, 1781, a British fleet under the command of former American general Benedict Arnold appeared at the mouth of the Thames River. Arnold’s mission was to destroy American privateers in New London and to capture military supplies stored there. The British troops were divided into two divisions of 800 men, with one landing on each side of the river. The division on the New London side, commanded personally by Arnold, marched upriver to the town, quickly taking in . . . — Map (db m19038) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — The Construction of Fort GriswoldStabilization and Preservation of Fort Griswold — Phase 1
In November 1775, Colonel Jedeiah Elderkin was directed by the Governor and the Council of Safety “to view the circumstances of the harbor at New London and neighboring places, and consider of the most proper place and manner of fortifying the same against our enemies.” Elderkin recommended the fortification of several places in New London and Groton including the summit of the hill on Groton Heights where, “It seems nature had prepared a place to plant cannon for the . . . — Map (db m19041) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Groton — Ye Ebenezer Avery House
Shelter was afforded our wounded & dying soldiers within this house, after the massacre at Fort Griswold, Sept. 6, 1781. — Map (db m19046) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — American Revolution
The first shots of the American Revolution were fired in Massachusetts in April of 1775, more than a year before the thirteen colonies declared their independence. Connecticut needed fortifications to defend the colony from British attack, and in November the colonial government authorized construction of forts on both sides of the Thames River to protect New London Harbor. The original Fort Trumbull, built just north of this fort, was named after the colony’s governor, Jonathan Trumbull. The . . . — Map (db m48280) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Jonathan Brooks Tomb   1786
In memory of Jonathan Brooks 1768 – 1848 A boy patriot of the American Revolution — Map (db m54084) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Nathan Hale
Born in Coventry Connecticut June 6, 1755 A schoolmaster in New London, A captain in the Continental Army who “resign’d his life a sacrifice to his country’s Liberty at New York Sept. 22d 1776” “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” — Map (db m48203) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Nathan HaleSchoolteacher & Spy from Connecticut
A Yale graduate, Hale began teaching here in the Union School House in 1774. He taught all ages and levels of boys at the same time. A progressive teacher for his day, Hale openly rewarded success in the classroom. He also believed in teaching girls, although at special times set apart from instruction for the boys. Deeply committed to liberty, he left teaching to serve the American Army in 1775. During the New York Campaign, he volunteered to serve as a spy for General Washington. With the . . . — Map (db m48320) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Revolutionary New LondonThe Fight for Liberty
When the “Lexington Alarm” was sounded in April 1775, three militia companies from New London and surrounding towns responded immediately. Within a month, six new regiments were formed with two New London companies participating in the Battle of Bunker Hill. In July another two regiments were formed; Nathan Hale was appointed lieutenant of one of these; It was an era of brave and self-denying men and the number who performed deeds worthy of remembrance was sizable. British . . . — Map (db m48318) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Revolutionary War PrivateeringLed to Benedict Arnold’s Attack
When the colonies chose revolution, the Continental Congress appointed Nathaniel Shaw to be in charge of Connecticut’s Navy. That navy consisted largely of privateers, privately-owned armed vessels, licensed to attack British shipping. Privateers were allowed to claim their cargos to sell for profit. Through most of the Revolutionary War, New York City was British headquarters. This made Long Island Sound a prime location for commerce-raiding. New London had 59 licensed privateers and . . . — Map (db m48319) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Shaw MansionHempstead Historic Neighborhood
Nathaniel Shaw came to New London around 1730 to take advantage of the town’s increasing maritime opportunities. He and his son, Nathaniel Jr. became successful merchants. In 1756 the older Shaw began building this mansion. Despite the abundance of natural stone, stone houses were uncommon in this region. Shaw may have been inspired to build this unusual house by an unexpected abundance of cheap labor in the form of displaced Acadians. These French colonists from Nova Scotia had been driven . . . — Map (db m48192) HM
Connecticut (New London County), New London — Shaw Mansion
Built 1756 by Captain Nathaniel Shaw, Senior •       •       • Continental, Colonial and State Naval Office of Nathaniel Shaw, Junior New London, Connecticut During the War of the American Revolution. He was appointed Naval Agent by the Continental Congress, April 23, 1776 Colony of Connecticut, July 10, 1776 State of Connecticut, October 21, 1778 and served until his death, April 15, 1782 •       •       • Among guests were General George Washington, Apr. 9 & 10, 1776 Marquis de Lafayette, . . . — Map (db m48205) HM
Connecticut (New London County), Stonington — John W. Richmond
East Face When Rhode Island by her legislation frm 1844 to 1850, Repudiated her Revolutionary Debt. Dr. Richmond removed from that State to this Borough and selected this as his Family Burial Place unwilling that the remains of himself and family should be disgraced by being a part of the common earth of a Repudiating State. Stonington June 1850. West Face Henrietta Richmond wife of Dr. John W. Richmond Born Nov. 29, 1782 Died July 17, 1849. Dr. John W. Richmond Born . . . — Map (db m30982) HM
Connecticut (Tolland County), Coventry — Captain Nathan Hale Monument
Captain Nathan Hale 1776 Born at Coventry June 6, 1755 I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country Died at New York Sep 22, 1776 — Map (db m12219) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Battles and Engagements of the Delaware Regiment
Battles around New York City and Environs, 1776-1779 1. Long Island, August 27, 1776 2. Throg's Neck, October 12-18, 1776 3. Mamaroneck Raid, October 22, 1776 4. White Plains, October 28, 1776 5. Retreat across New Jersey, November-December 1776 6. Trenton, December 26, 1776 7. Staten Island, August 22, 1777 8. Stony Point, July 16, 1779 Philadelphia Campaign, 1777-1778 1. Brandywine, September 11, 1777 2. Germantown, October 4, 1777 . . . — Map (db m39713) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-53 — Byfield
Near this site stood the boyhood home of Caesar Rodney, signer of the Declaration of Independence, Brigadier General of the State's militia (1775-1778), and President (Governor) of Delaware (1778-1781). Byfield was originally settled in the early 1680's by Daniel Jones, Rodney's maternal great grandfather. Following Jones' death, it became the family seat for three generations of the Rodney family. Caesar Rodney spent his formative years here and eventually acquired ownership of the property . . . — Map (db m75835) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Colonel John Haslet
Presbyterian minister, later practiced medicine, Member of Colonial Assembly, Member of Council of Safety, 1775. Commanded First Delaware Militia Regiment. This regiment, reviewed in Dover, later joined Washington’s army and fought in Battles of Long Island and White Plains. It disbanded December, 1776. Haslet continuing with Washington’s army was killed Battle of Princeton, January 3, 1777. Buried First Presbyterian Churchyard, Philadelphia. Re-interred here 1841, when address was delivered by John M. Clayton. — Map (db m4716) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Dover Light InfantryKent County, Delaware Militia — 1776-1777
The Light Infantry Company of Dover, a part of the 1st Battalion of Kent County, mustered in on 2 April 1776. Each militia volunteer was uniformly armed, equipped, and wore a standard military coat of green faced with red lapels, cuffs, and collar. From 14 December 1776 to 14 January 1777, Captain Thomas Rodney, youngest brother to Declaration of Independence signer Caesar Rodney, and his light infantry company responded to General George Washington's Call to Arms for militia during . . . — Map (db m39576) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Home of John Dickinson
"The Penman of the Revolution." Member of Delaware colonial and state assemblies. Member of Continental Congress, Annapolis Convention, and Philadelphia Federal Constitutional Convention. Signer for Delaware of Articles of Confederation and Federal Constitution. Governor of Delaware and President of Second Delaware Constitutional Convention. Born Maryland, 1732; died Wilmington, 1808. — Map (db m39583) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Liberty Bell ReproductionDedicated to You, a Free Citizen in a Free Land
Dedicated to you, a free citizen in a free land, this reproduction of the Liberty Bell was presented to the people of Delaware by direction of The Honorable John W. Snyder, Secretary of the Treasury.

As the inspirational symbol of the United States Savings Bonds Independence Drive from May 15 to July 4, 1950, it was displayed in every part of this state.

The dimensions and tone are identical with those of the original Liberty Bell when it rang out our Independence in 1776. In standing . . . — Map (db m42759) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Revolutionary War Patriot John Banning
Born in 1740 in Dover, Kent Co., DE Died Feb, 15, 1791 in Dover, Kent Co., DE Justice of the Peace Member of Joint Committee of Accounts, Committee of Correspondence, Council of Safety, and General Assembly. — Map (db m42754) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Bayonets of the Revolution
The Delaware Regiment fought in nearly every campaign of the American Revolution.

For a small state, Delaware's soldiers played a large role in the Revolution. Answering Congress' call, Delaware raised a regiment of 500-600 men by the summer of 1776. They first saw action at the battle of Long Island, fighting with distinction, and then received the post of honor covering the Continental Army's withdrawal across New Jersey. In January 1777, the regiment reorganized, with many veterans . . . — Map (db m39712) HM

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