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Antebellum South, US Historical Markers

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Buena Vista Plantation Home image, Click for more information
By Mark Hilton, December 17, 2013
Buena Vista Plantation Home
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Buena VistaMontgomery-Janes-Wittaker Home — (circa 1830)
This antebellum plantation house was completed by Capt. William Montgomery, a contemporary of Prattville's founder, Daniel Pratt. This “Deep South” architecture reflects the Federal style with the later addition of a Colonial . . . — Map (db m70795) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Daniel Pratt Cemetery / George Cooke
(Front): Daniel Pratt CemeteryFinal resting place of early Alabama industrialist Daniel Pratt, 1799-1873, and wife Esther Ticknor Pratt, 1803-1875. He was from New Hampshire and she, Connecticut. Married 1827 at Fortville, Jones County, . . . — Map (db m27957) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Heritage Park
Located within Daniel Pratt Historic District, this park overlooks Autauga Creek and the manufacturing complex around which this New England style village developed. Daniel Pratt founded Prattville in 1839, and patterned the town after those of his . . . — Map (db m27958) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Mulbry Grove CottageMcWilliams - Smith - Rice House
Built circa, 1840s by A.K. McWilliams, this story and one-half Federal-style raised cottage with Greek Revival elements was the residence of Amos Smith, who named the town of Prattville. The west front parlor was the meeting place where the . . . — Map (db m27982) HM
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Pratt HomesiteCirca 1842
Daniel Pratt, Prattville’s founding father, constructed an imposing home and garden within a quarter-mile of this site on Autauga Creek, near his industrial complex. The large home was designed and erected by Pratt himself, a noted architect / . . . — Map (db m27985) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Confederate Hospital
. . . — Map (db m27986) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Doctor Francis' Office
This general practitioner's office is the only remaining structure of its type in northeast Alabama. It was built on the court-house square about 1850 by Dr. J. C. Francis, a beloved family doctor who served Jacksonville for more than 50 years. He . . . — Map (db m23350) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — JacksonvilleFirst County Seat — Calhoun County, 1833-99
Town first called Drayton. Renamed in 1834 to honor President Andrew Jackson. Seat moved to Anniston in 1899. Calhoun Co. originally was Benton Co., for Col. T. H. Benton, Creek War officer, later U. S. Senator from Missouri. . . . — Map (db m36471) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Thomas A. Walker1811-1888
Prominent citizen of Jacksonville who served Alabama as Brigadier General, State Militia; member Legislature and Pres. of Senate; Circuit Court Judge; and Pres. Ala. and Tenn. Railroad He owned extensive cotton plantations and mining interests . . . — Map (db m29921) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Claiborne — 93001517 — Dellet-Bedsole PlantationC. 1850 — National Register of Historic Places
This 4000 acre complex has been recognized for its contribution to our understanding of the history of Monroe County and the State of Alabama. Originally developed as a cotton plantation during the Antebellum period, this farm has been in continuous . . . — Map (db m80345) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — William Winston Home
Construction on the home which became the center building of Deshler High School was begun in 1824 by Clark T. Barton. William Winston purchased and completed the Georgian-style dwelling in 1833. The largest remaining antebellum house in Tuscumbia, . . . — Map (db m28565) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — A Prison Chimney?
This engraving of the Union Prison at Cahaba was published in 1877 by Benson J. Lossing. The stockade had already been removed, so the details of the brick structure are visible. The artist apparently was in a boat in the Alabama River, behind you . . . — Map (db m83506) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba Drug Store
The Cahaba Drug Store once covered this cellar hole. It was operated by Herbert Hudson and J. D. Craig. On the same lot were T. L. Craig's large family grocery, Coleman's dry goods store, and Fellows' Jewelry. All these men were related . . . — Map (db m23008) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahaba First State Capital1818-1826
This stone marks the site of Cahaba, selected November 21, 1818 as the first permanent capital of Alabama. The seat of goverment remaining here until removed to Tuscaloosa by the Legislature, January 1825. On December 13, 1819, it was fixed as . . . — Map (db m22609) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Cahawba's Changing Landscape
In 1818, Alabama's first governor carved the capital city of Cahawba out of the wilderness. In less than 50 years, Cahawba grew from a frontier capital full of log cabins to one of America's wealthiest communities, with some of the finest . . . — Map (db m83508) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Civil War Prison
In 1858, the railroad company graded away an Indian mound that stood here. A brick warehouse was built in its place. From 1863 - 1865 the Confederate government used this warehouse to hold captured Federal Soldiers. You are standing on a pile of . . . — Map (db m22666) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Commissary - R.R. Depot
This cellar was under Joseph Babcock's brick store. During the Civil War the building was used as a commissary. Babcock's warehouse and cotton shed were located to your right on the bluff overlooking the river. The family home, kitchen, and . . . — Map (db m23287) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Crocheron's Row
A "row" was a 19th century shopping mall. The word was used when a building or block had several similar storefronts arranged in a straight line or row. This cellar marks the spot where David and Nicholas Crocheron built a large 2 story brick . . . — Map (db m83509) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Dallas County Courthouse
The grassed over mound of brick before you was once Dallas County's courthouse. This courthouse was built in 1834. It was dismantled prior to 1905 by brick salvagers. Cahawba was the county seat from 1818 to 1866. This brought a lot of people, . . . — Map (db m23010) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Footprint of a Church
St. Luke's Episcopal Church was built at Cahawba in 1854 but was dismantled and moved sometime after 1884 but before 1888. It was reassembled fifteen miles away in a rural community called Martin's Station. The raised outline before you indicates . . . — Map (db m83510) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Old Cemetery
This site was set aside by the 1820 General Assembly, burials here date from 1818 to 1847. Interred are some of the state's earliest figures. There is no record of names, many handsome tombs have been destroyed, seven marked ones remaining, six are . . . — Map (db m23355) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Saltmarsh Hall
In the late 1850s, Cahaba experienced a building boom. Everyone expected the town to prosper because of the new railroad. One of the first large brick structures built in this prosperous period was completed in 1856 by Dr. Saltmarsh. He wanted . . . — Map (db m23009) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Site of Alabama's Statehouse1820 - 1825
This structure collapsed in 1833 and its fallen remains were reportedly heaped into a railroad embankment. Consequently, we have no picture of the Statehouse that was drawn by someone who actually saw the building. Any modern picture you see of this . . . — Map (db m75909) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — St. Luke's Episcopal Church
St. Luke's was consecrated in 1854. It was an outstanding example of the Gothic Revival style, popular at the time. The contractor closely followed designs in a widely circulated book, Rural Architecture, published in 1852 by the celebrated . . . — Map (db m75922) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Crocheron Columns
The Crocherons were from Staten Island, New York. Richard Conner Crocheron arrived in town about 1837 to help run the family store. He traveled north for his bride in 1843 after building her this brick home. The back wall adjoined the brick store . . . — Map (db m22870) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Old Brick Store
By 1858 many brick stores had been built in Cahaba, so everyone called this the "old brick store." Merchant Sam M. Hill turned the building into one huge dry goods store where shoppers could buy just about anything! Col. Hill, like most of the . . . — Map (db m23242) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Vine Street
Vine Street was Cahawba's business district. Stores, offices and hotels were tightly packed together along these three blocks. Homes were scattered over an entire square mile. Nearly every house had a yard of one or two acres. — Map (db m83520) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — “Fairoaks”
This Greek revival mansion was built c. 1853 for William B. King and named “Fairoaks” for the many trees found about the place. King was the nephew of Vice President William Rufus King. Ann B. Wilson, a half-sister of the builder, . . . — Map (db m83521) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Fairoaks Square
Once a gracious turn-of-the-century neighborhood, many of the homes here were close to condemnation when purchased by Circle “S” Industries, Inc. in 1980. In all, 12 Victorian cottages were renovated in the area. Built between 1870 . . . — Map (db m37651) HM
Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Sturdivant Hall
One of the finest examples of neo-classic architecture in the South; designed by Thomas Helm Lee for Edward T. Watts. Completed in 1853. Sold 1864 to John M. Parkman, 1870 to Emile Gillman. Purchased in 1957 through a bequest from Robert . . . — Map (db m37649) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — First United Methodist Church Of Attalla
In 1851 twelve Methodists met in Newton (later Attalla) to plan a Methodist Episcopal Church. A crude log building on North Fifth Street served as the first church. In 1861 and again in 1882 the church relocated on Fifth to accommodate the growing . . . — Map (db m83731) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Greensboro — Greensboro Presbyterian Church
Organized 1823 by Rev. James Hillhouse of South Carolina, with Patrick Norris and William Hillhouse, veterans of American Revolution, as founding elders. Original wooden structure replaced by brick building in 1841 under pastorate . . . — Map (db m33746) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Greensboro — Magnolia Grove
Birthplace, ancestral home of Richard Pearson Hobson 1870-1937 Spanish - American War Hero Admiral Hobson, as naval officer, Statesman, lecturer and author, Urged national preparedness: Championed human welfare causes. Alabama made . . . — Map (db m83755) HM
Alabama (Hale County), Greensboro — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
This parish established 1830. Third oldest in Alabama diocese. Church consecrated in 1843 by Leonidas Polk, Bishop of Louisiana, (later a Confederate general). Here Nicholas H. Cobbs was chosen first Bishop of Alabama in 1844. . . . — Map (db m33747) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Gen. Andrew JacksonSoldier, Statesman, 7th President U.S.A.
Jackson County was created by the State Legislature on December 13, 1819 while in session in Huntsville, Ala. The county was named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson who was visiting in Huntsville at the time. This Statue was presented by the . . . — Map (db m22262) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Robert Thomas Scott1800-1863
Planter, tavern operator, newspaper editor, legislator, and land developer, he sought in vain to have the Jackson County seat moved from Bellefont to the settlement that bore his name. After his death in 1863, his widow reached an agreement in 1868 . . . — Map (db m22260) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Scottsboro — Scottsboro Railroad Depot
The Memphis and Charleston Railroad Company constructed the Scottsboro Railroad Depot in 1860-1861 as a passenger and freight facility. The rail line ran throughout the Confederacy and the Union considered its capture vital to cutting off supplies . . . — Map (db m22258) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Stevenson — Stevenson Depot and Hotel
A one-story depot building was constructed here in 1853, when the railroad was first laid through Stevenson. That building burned after the Civil War and was replaced by the present brick depot and hotel in 1872. During the Civil War, Stevenson . . . — Map (db m22271) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Bessemer — Union Baptist Church And Cemetery
Union Baptist Church was organized in 1834 by 18 or 20 members from Canaan Church. The Libscomb area was then known as East End. Members of the Rockett and Ware families donated the original two acreas of this site and a log cabin, which served as . . . — Map (db m24352) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — North Birmingham
On October 1, 1886, the North Birmingham Land Company was formed to develop a planned industrial and residential town on 900 acres of land, formerly part of the Alfred Nathaniel Hawkins plantation north of Village Creek. The plan included sites for . . . — Map (db m26700) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Smithfield
Marker Front: This residential area was carved from the Joseph Riley Smith plantation, a 600 acre antebellum farm, one of the largest in 19th century Jefferson County. Smithfield lies to the west of Birmingham's city center on the flat land . . . — Map (db m26990) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Walker Memorial Church
In 1818 before Alabama, Jefferson County, Elyton or Birmingham existed, The Elyton Methodist Church was established on Center Street. It was moved to 14 Second Avenue, and in 1909, to its present site. Renamed in 1910 for Corilla Porter Walker . . . — Map (db m24348) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — Wilson's RaidersHeadquarters March 28-31, 1865
Gen. James H. Wilson, USA, having crossed the Tennessee River with a large force of well equipped cavalry, grouped them here at Elyton. Their mission: to destroy Alabama's economic facilities for supporting the War. From these headquarters he . . . — Map (db m24358) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Leeds — Rowan House
Thomas Rowan, son of Irish immigrants who settled in St. Clair County, Alabama, purchased his first 130 acres at auction and built a house here by c. 1854 that probably forms the core of the two northeast rooms. Heir John Thomas Rowan and his wife, . . . — Map (db m24716) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Mountain Brook — Wallace S. McElwain / Irondale Furnace Ruins
Wallace S. McElwain (1832-1888)McElwain trained in a gun factory in New York and in a foundry in Ohio before moving to Holly Springs, MS, where he operated Jones, McElwain and Company Iron Foundry. He was well known in the Southeast for his . . . — Map (db m26266) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Ante-Bellum Cotton Mills 1840
About one mile west of here is the site of the Globe Cotton Factory which was erected on Cypress Creek in 1840. By 1857 its operations included three cotton mills, a flour mill, and two corn mills, all powered by the use of three dams. By 1860 the . . . — Map (db m83938) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Deibert Park-dedicated May 25, 2000-
This park was donated to the people of Florence by Dr. Kirk R. and Lillian Cook Deibert who initially acquired this property in 1952. The acreage was once a part of a large ante-bellum plantation owned by Judge Sidney Cherry Posey. In 1875 his heirs . . . — Map (db m33086) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Florence, Alabama
Side A The Forks of Cypress plantation was established in 1818 by James and Sarah Jackson. Its home, believed the design of William Nichols, was one of Alabama's great houses, featuring perhaps the earliest peristyle colonnades in America. . . . — Map (db m83975) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Regions Bank
This building which was completed in 1983 is an accurate replica of the local historical mansion known as The Forks of Cypress. The original mansion, completed in 1822 by James and Sarah Jackson on a knoll five miles from Florence Alabama, was . . . — Map (db m29253) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Sannoner Historic District
Named for Ferdinand Sannoner, who surveyed the town of Florence for the Cypress Land Company in 1818, the district contains twenty-five structures on North Court and North Pine Streets. Wealthy planters, lawyers and merchants occupied the six fine . . . — Map (db m84047) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — Courtland's Early Architecture(circa 1820-1940)
Side A Structures within the Courtland historic district represent over 150 years of changing tastes in building design. Although only a few of Courtland’s earliest buildings survive, the Federal~style architecture of the oldest houses . . . — Map (db m28990) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — The Town of Courtland / Early Settlers1819
Side A Federal lands in this area were first sold in 1818 and quickly purchased by settlers and speculators. A group of investors calling themselves the “Courtland Land Company” and consisting of William H. Whitaker, James M. . . . — Map (db m28989) HM
Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Noble Hall
Marker Front: The Greek Revival rock and mortar house was built by Addison Frazer (1809-1873) between 1852 and 1854 and served as the center for a 2,000 acre cotton plantation. Frazer owned 100 slaves and was on the Board of Trustees of . . . — Map (db m25988) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Erected in 1835This building has since been occupied by
The First National Bank of Huntsville and its predecessors: The National Bank of Huntsville 1865-1889. The Northern Bank of Alabama 1852-1865 (Operation suspended 1863-1865) The Branch of the State Bank of Huntsville 1833-1852 . . . — Map (db m27852) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — First Bank In AlabamaPlanters And Merchants Bank of Huntsville — Housed on this site in brick building
Housed on this site in brick building 44 ft. x 54 ft Chartered by Mississippi Territorial Legislature December 11, 1816 Commenced operations October 17, 1817, shortly thereafter made depository for Huntsville Federal Land Office funds. . . . — Map (db m27785) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Howard Weeden Home
Built 1819 by H. C. Bradford, this home was later owned by John Read, John McKinley, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court (1837-1852), Bartley M. Lowe, M. C. Betts and Marie Howard Weeden (1846-1905) whose poetry and paintings preserve nineteenth . . . — Map (db m27841) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Northern Terminus Indian Creek CanalFirst Canal in Alabama
Incorporated 1820 Completed 1831 This canal was constructed to the Tennessee River to facilitate the transportation of cotton to market. Developers were: Thomas Fearn, LeRoy Pope, Stephen S. Ewing, Henry Cook, and Samuel Hazard. — Map (db m27844) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Passenger DepotHuntsville, Alabama — Built 1860
Memphis and Charleston Railroad Company Eastern Division headquarters in this passenger depot, adjoining yards and ships captured by Union Army April 11, 1862. Vital east-west Confederate rail link severed; C.S.A. soldiers imprisoned here. Depot . . . — Map (db m85547) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Slave Cemetery1800s
This cemetery site was used as a burial ground for slaves who lived on both the Peter Blow and Job Key plantations from 1811 to 1865. Dred Scott's first wife and their two children are believed to have been buried here. The cemetery continued to be . . . — Map (db m31562) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Tallulah Bankhead / I. Schiffman Building1902-1968 / Birthplace of Tallulah Bankhead — Alabama’s Best-Known Actress
Side A Tallulah Bankhead was the toast of the London theatre in the 1920's, and nationally renowned for her dramatic roles in “The Little Foxes” (1939), “The Skin of Our Teeth” (1942), the movie . . . — Map (db m27850) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — The Church Of The Nativity, Episcopal
Side A The Church of the Nativity congregation was organized December 17, 1842 - the name chosen because of the approaching Christmas season. The Convention of the Diocese of Alabama, Protestant Episcopal Church, approved the congregation . . . — Map (db m27858) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Twickenham Historic District
Designated by the City of Huntsville, Alabama March 23, 1972. This district is a living museum of American architectural styles dating from 1814. It encompasses about one~half of the original Town of Twickenham, Huntsville's first offical name. . . . — Map (db m85612) HM
Alabama (Marengo County), Demopolis — Bluff Hall
Situated on historic White Bluff overlooking the Tombigbee River, Bluff Hall was built in 1832 by slaves of Allen Glover for his daughter, Sarah Serena, and her husband, Francis Strother Lyon. Lawyer and planter, F. S. Lyon, served in both . . . — Map (db m37997) HM
Alabama (Marengo County), Demopolis — Foscue House
Built in 1840 for Augustus Foscue (1799-1861), a North Carolina native who owned more than 3,000 acres and 137 slaves in Marengo County by 1850. Daughter Mary Alice (1838-1899) married in 1855 to Dr. Bryan Watkins Whitfield (1828-1908), son of Gen. . . . — Map (db m38180) HM
Alabama (Marengo County), Demopolis — Gaineswood
Built 1842-1860 by Gen. Nathan Bryan Whitfield 1799-1868 accomplished planter of the Canebrake using imported materials and artisans Glorifying the Greek Revival Architecture by combining Doric exterior Corinthian grand ballroom Ionic parlor . . . — Map (db m38068) HM
Alabama (Marengo County), Demopolis — Whitfield Canal
Drainage canal constructed between 1845 and 1863 by slaves of General Nathan Bryan Whitfield, builder of Gaineswood, to prevent water from overflowing and flooding his plantation. The water from 2,070 acres south and east of Gaineswood . . . — Map (db m37993) HM
Alabama (Marshall County), Guntersville — Ravine Used For Protection Against Yankee Shelling
The first major attack on Guntersville during the Civil War occurred on the morning of Monday, July 28, 1862. The Federals had marched by night and had reached a hill on the north side of the Tennessee River and from this vantage point aimed their . . . — Map (db m22253) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Oakleigh
Started in 1833 by James Roper on a Spanish land grant, “Oakleigh” was named for the magnificent oaks around it. The “T” shaped dwelling with elegant parlors and curved outside stairway from the brick terrace to front gallery . . . — Map (db m85908) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Richards D.A.R. House Museum — 1860
One of the premier antebellum structures in the city, the house was built by Charles Richards, a riverboat captain originally from Maine. The building is considered to have Mobile's finest cast iron, featuring figures in a garden setting and . . . — Map (db m86511) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Historic Chappell HouseCirca 1850
One of Montgomery's last pre-Civil War cottages, this structure occupies the site of General John Scott's 1817 pioneer settlement, "Alabama Town." The columned entrance stoop shows how the Greek Revival style influenced smaller houses as well . . . — Map (db m95139) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Montgomery’s Slave Markets / First Emancipation Observance - 1866
Side A The city’s slave market was at the Artesian Basin (Court Square). Slaves of all ages were auctioned, along with land and livestock, standing in line to be inspected. Public posters advertised sales and included gender, approximate . . . — Map (db m28187) HM
Alabama (Montgomery County), Pike Road — Chantilly Plantation
Chantilly Plantation was purchased in 1832 at public outcry by Dr. Thomas Burge Taylor of Columbia, SC as a wedding gift for his bride, Harriott Pinkney Raoul. John Ashurst, its original owner, had moved further west. Harriott, a French woman, . . . — Map (db m91529) HM
Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — A County Older Than The State, Morgan County
Alabama Territorial Legislature created this county in 1818 from lands ceded by Cherokee Indians in 1816. County first named Cotaco, for large creek in county. Named Morgan County in 1821 for Maj. Gen. Daniel Morgan, Revolutionary hero, winner over . . . — Map (db m27759) HM
Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — Albany1887
On Jan. 11, 1887, the Decatur Land Improvement and Furnace Company, Inc. was formed under the leadership of E. C. Gordon, C.C. Harris and W.W. Littlejohn. With a capital investment of $7,500,000, the company purchased 5600 acres of land, including . . . — Map (db m86479) HM
Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — Old State Bank Building
Erected 1833, Cost $9,482. Classic Revival design. Listed on National Register of Historic Places. Decatur Branch, Bank of The State of Alabama. Chartered 1832 by state legislature, profitable until 1837, charter revoked 1842 and closed. 1842-1901 . . . — Map (db m27762) HM
Alabama (Pickens County), Carrollton — Pickens County CourthouseErected 1877-78
Pickens County, named for General Andrew Pickens of South Carolina, was established December 19, 1820. First County Site was Pickensville. On March 5, 1830, the government awarded 80 acres of land at Carrollton for the County Site. The first . . . — Map (db m22178) HM
Alabama (Randolph County), Goldville — GoldvilleGoldville, Alabama
Incorporated on January 25, 1843 Was at one time one of the largest cities in Alabama with a population of near 5,000 With the coming of the California gold rush in 1849 the city became a dormant municipality later to . . . — Map (db m95077) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Crawford — CrockettsvilleCrawford, Alabama
The community of Crockettsville was settled at about the time Russell County was formed in 1832. Among the first settlers were Jerry Segar and Green Sewell. It was named in honor of David "Davy" Crockett who served as a scout in Andrew Jackson's . . . — Map (db m33541) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Hurtsboro — Long FamilyNimrod Long House
Nimrod Washington Long moved to Alabama from Georgia in the 1830s. A planter, mill owner and state legislator, he had real estate and railroad interests in Russell County. This house was the plantation home of Nimrod Washington Long in Spring Hill, . . . — Map (db m69433) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Seale — Seale United Methodist Church
Marker Front: The Methodist Congregation of which the church at Seale was organized in 1842, were pioneer families with a deep faith in God and a clear vision of the future. This group was centered around a small meeting place and a . . . — Map (db m23594) HM
Alabama (Shelby County), Columbiana — Shelby County Courthouse1854-1908
Original seat of government of Shelby County established 1818 at Shelbyville (Pelham). Moved to Columbiana 1826. First courthouse a small wooden building located on this site. Replaced 1854 by two-story brick structure which forms central portion . . . — Map (db m24203) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Horace King
Born a slave in South Carolina in 1807, Horace King became a master bridge builder while working with John Godwin. With the aid of Tuscaloosan Robert Jemison, King was freed by act of the Alabama legislature in 1846. He went on to build many bridges . . . — Map (db m28913) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — John MurphyGovernor 1825 - 1829
He initiated construction of the Capitol, the University of Alabama, and the State Bank. The legislature passed laws, known as slave codes, to severely restrict the rights of slaves, while citizens began to press for the removal of Alabama's . . . — Map (db m29020) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — The Friedman Home
Built 1835 by Alfred Battle; purchased 1875 by Bernard Friedman; willed to the city of Tuscaloosa 1965 by Hugo Friedman. Traditionally a social and cultural center in Tuscaloosa, it was the residence of Virginia Tunstall Clay-Clopton, author of . . . — Map (db m35368) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — The Little Round House
Constructed as a guard house for the Alabama Corps of Cadets during the early 1860's, the Little Round House provided shelter from inclement weather for cadets on sentry duty. Until 1865, it also housed the University Drum Corps, which was composed . . . — Map (db m25387) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — The President's Mansion
In 1838 The University of Alabama Board of Trustees appropriated funds for a more suitable residence for the University's new president Basil Manly. The mansion on this site was built between 1839 and 1841 from plans provided by Michael Barry who . . . — Map (db m25414) HM
Arkansas (Chicot County), Lake Village — 79 — Lakeport in the Civil War
Side 1 When Arkansas went to war in 1861, Lycurgus and Lydia Johnson and their family stayed with their home at Lakeport. By 1862, U.S. gunboats were common on the Mississippi River, and on Sept. 6, 1862, Confederate troops burned 158 . . . — Map (db m89797) HM
Arkansas (Chicot County), Lake Village — Lakeport Plantation House
Side 1 The Lakeport Plantation house was constructed circa 1859 for Lycurgus and Lydia Taylor Johnson. The skilled craftsmanship and lasting character are testaments to those who built the house. It is preserved in remembrance of all who . . . — Map (db m90491) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 16 — Winning the WarTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
The U.S. Navy arrived across the street at 3801 Nebraska Avenue during World War II, taking the Colonial style red-brick campus of Mount Vernon Seminary for secret “essential wartime activities.” Soon more than 5,000 workers occupied . . . — Map (db m47787) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — 12 — Christ Church and Its ParishionersTour of Duty — Barracks Row Heritage Trail
This is Christ Church, Washington Parish, the first Episcopal church established in Washington City (1794), and attended by Presidents Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams. At first Christ Church met in a nearby tobacco warehouse. In 1806 . . . — Map (db m39235) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 15 of 19 — College HillCultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
Wayland Seminary opened in Foggy Bottom just after the Civil War to train formerly enslaved people and others as “preachers and teachers for the South” and as missionaries to evangelize Africa. In 1875 it moved here, later merging with . . . — Map (db m23947) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.7 — Freedom PlazaCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“I have a dream.”                             Martin Luther King, Jr. August 1963 The block-long plaza at 13th and Pennsylvania Avenue just ahead to your left honors civil rights leader Martin Luther King . . . — Map (db m28528) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — The Christian Index
America's oldest existing religious newspaper was first published on this city block at 925 E Street on February 2, 1822. Founded by the legendary Baptist leader Luther Rice, the paper was originally known as The Columbian Star and utilized . . . — Map (db m28559) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — w.1 — The Church of the EpiphanyCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Carpets, cushions, and hymnbooks were packed away ... ambulances began to stop ... lastly come the surgeons....” Margaret Leech, Reveille in Washington. Church spires dominated the skyline of the city of Washington at the . . . — Map (db m29618) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .4 — The Roots of Freedom and EqualityCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“It is known to you that events have transpired within the last few days, deeply affecting the peace and character of our community.” With these words, city officials tried to calm the angry mobs gathering on this corner in April . . . — Map (db m25271) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Leonard A. Grimes(1815 - 1873)
Leonard A. Grimes, a Black man born free in Leesburg, Virginia, owned a residence on this corner from 1836 to 1846. In the 1830s, he owned a successful coach business transporting passengers in and around Washington. He also carried slaves . . . — Map (db m46970) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — Daniel Webster503 D Street
. . . — Map (db m29698) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Judiciary Square — e.2 — Old City HallCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
"--witness to the end of slavery in the nation’s capital." This imposing Greek Revival building was Washington’s first city hall, designed by George Hadfield and built between 1820 and 1850. It house the city court and an elected mayor and . . . — Map (db m29655) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest — 8 of 17 — Banneker Circle: Vista to the PastRiver Farms to Urban Towers — Southwest Heritage Trail
This high ground serves as a monument to Benjamin Banneker, a free African American who charted the stars for the first survey of Washington, DC. Banneker was 60 years old when he hired on to assist surveyor Andrew Ellicott. A tobacco planter from . . . — Map (db m25171) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest — 10 of 17 — Escape from SlaveryRiver Farms to Urban Towers — Southwest Heritage Trail
Before the Civil War, Washington was a slave-holding city. But many of its citizens–especially free blacks and abolitionists–assisted freedom seekers at locations known as stops on the Underground Railroad. The largest attempted . . . — Map (db m20605) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest — 12 of 17 — The Law House In Peace and WarRiver Farms to Urban Towers — Southwest Heritage Trail
To your left across Water Street is the Thomas Law House, now a community center for the Tiber Island cooperative. The Federal style house was designed by William Lovering in 1794 for businessman Thomas Law and his bride Eliza Parke Custis, . . . — Map (db m20430) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Theodore Roosevelt Island — The Mason Estate
In contrast to the island today, this 1818 map by Robert King portrays the island as one continuous garden rich in native and cultivated plants, flowers, and fruits and divided by an avenue planted with trees. The estate was the summer retreat for . . . — Map (db m19988) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Washington — e.3 — Senator Daniel WebsterCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable,” Senator Daniel Webster, January 1830. Senator Daniel Webster, eloquent advocate for the preservation of the Union and a political giant in pre-Civil War America, . . . — Map (db m29708) HM
Florida (Broward County), Fort Lauderdale — F-404 — Old Fort Lauderdale Village
Old Fort Lauderdale Village at the intersection of the New River and the Florida East Coast Railway (F.E.C.) incorporates four turn-of-the-20th century historic buildings. These include the 1905 New River Inn, the 1905 Philemon N. Bryan House, the . . . — Map (db m63880) HM
Florida (Dixie County), Old Town — F-55 — Oldtown
Inhabited by the Upper Creeks, Oldtown, often called Suwanee Oldtown, was one of the largest Indian villages in northern Florida. In Andrew Jackson's punitive expedition into Florida in April, 1818, Oldtown was captured. Most of the renegade Indians . . . — Map (db m17712) HM
Florida (Franklin County), Apalachicola — F-270 — The Raney House
During the 1830's, when the cotton port of Apalachicola was rapidly expanding. David G. Raney built a rather plain, Federal style house at this site. Around 1850, A two - story portico and other features of the then popular Greek Revival . . . — Map (db m26663) HM
Florida (Gadsden County), Quincy — F-286 — Gadsden County
Gadsden, Florida's fifth county, was formed in 1823. It once ran from Georgia to the Gulf of Mexico, from the Suwannee River to the Apalachicola River. Quincy, the county seat, was incorporated in 1828. Previously known as Middle Florida, the new . . . — Map (db m29677) HM
Florida (Hamilton County), White Springs — F-24 — White Springs
These sulphur springs were thought to have medicinal properties and were considered sacred by the Indians. Warriors wounded in battle reputedly were not attacked when they came here to recuperate. Settlers moved into the vicinity in 1826 and the . . . — Map (db m13675) HM
Florida (Hernando County), Brooksville — F-510 — Chinsegut Hill
In 1842, South Carolinian Bird M. Pearson staked a claim on 160 acres and called it Mount Airy, one of the few surviving plantations in Florida and one of the oldest houses in Hernando County. Pearson built the manor house's east wing in 1847 and . . . — Map (db m67006) HM
Florida (Lafayette County), Mayo — F-221 — Lafayette County
Lafayette County was created December 23, 1856, from Madison County. The county was named in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette, the French citizen who rendered invaluable assistance to the Colonies during the Revolutionary War. The famed Suwannee . . . — Map (db m17725) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — Goodwood(2 miles east on Lafayette Grant)
Ante-bellum mansion constructed of brick shipped from New York to port of St. Marks. Completed in 1843. Fine fan lights and pleasing window placements. Circular stairway. Rare old furnishings. — Map (db m67031) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — Goodwood Mansion(Old Croom Mansion)
The land upon which Goodwood Mansion was constructed was part of the original land grant rewarded to the Marquis de Lafayette for his service during the Revolutionary War. Hardy Croom of North Carolina, a planter and recognized naturalist, purchased . . . — Map (db m67032) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-213 — Old Pisgah
Side 1 Missionaries sent by the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church held services for the Centreville community settlers at this site in the early 1820's. John Slade, known as the "Father of Methodism in Florida," . . . — Map (db m79535) HM
Florida (Madison County), Madison — F-196 — The Wardlaw-Smith House
The Wardlaw-Smith House was erected in the early 1860's for Benjamin F. Wardlaw, a prominent local citizen. Following the Civil War Battle of Olustee in February, 1864, it served as a Confederate hospital. This fine example of Greek Revival . . . — Map (db m17745) HM
Florida (Manatee County), Ellenton — F-162 — Gamble Mansion and Plantation
[Marker Front]: At the close of the Seminole War in 1842, this frontier was opened to settlement. Major Robert Gamble and other sugar planters soon located along the rich Manatee River valley, and by 1845 a dozen plantations were producing . . . — Map (db m15665) HM
Georgia (Baker County), Newton — 004-1 — Baker County
This County, created by Acts of the Legislature Dec. 12 & 24, 1825, is named for Col. John Baker of Revolutionary fame. The original County Site was at Byron but an Act of Dec. 26, 1831, established a new Site which was named Newton for Sgt. John . . . — Map (db m26981) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — Alexis de Tocqueville
The 25 year-old French aristocrat and author of Democracy in America visited this area during his 1831-1832 tour of America — Map (db m13143) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-1 — Brown-Stetson-Sanford House
This Milledgeville Federal-style house was built c. 1825 on North Wilkinson Street for George T. Brown by English-born builder-architect John Marlor. It was operated as the U.S. Hotel and then the Beecher-Brown Hotel to serve visitors and . . . — Map (db m13141) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-23 — Fort Wilkinson
Three hundred yards east of this point stood Ft. Wilkinson, established in 1797 on Georgia's Indian boundary. Garrisoned by soldiers whose families lived outside the stockade, it was an early trading house where Creek Indians were provided . . . — Map (db m13140) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-17 — Howell Cobb Plantation
Site of the large Baldwin County plantation of Howell Cobb, one of the 'Great Georgia Triumvirate' of Stephens, Toombs and Cobb, and his wife, the former Mary Ann Lamar. Born at Cherry Hill in Jefferson County, Georgia Sept. 7, 1815, he graduated . . . — Map (db m13137) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — Jarrett Springs
Jarrett Springs formerly know as Commissioner Springs, flows in an enclosed structure about 40 yards on adjacent land. In 1803 , because of the abundant and clear water supply, this site was selected by the Georgia Legislature as the . . . — Map (db m43164) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-24 — Milledgeville State Hospital
In 1837, largely through the influence of Tomlinson Fort and William A. White, the legislature appropriated $20,000 for a dormitory near Milledgeville where the state’s mentally ill could receive custodial care. A four-story building was opened on . . . — Map (db m13135) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Milledgeville — 005-21 — Old Oglethorpe University
This is the site of the antebellum college established in the community of Midway by the Hopewell Presbytery in 1833. Its first president, Carlisle P. Beman, was succeded by Samuel K. Talmage. In 1861, students and faculty entered Confederate . . . — Map (db m10803) HM
Georgia (Baldwin County), Scottsboro — 005-4 — John Clark House
This house, now the Du Bignon home, was once the home of John Clark, Governor of Georgia. At the age of 16, John Clark fought with his father, General Elijah Clark, distinguished Revolutionary soldier, at the decisive Battle of Kettle Creek. . . . — Map (db m13138) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-7 — Mt. Pleasant Church
In 1780 a group of people, Garrisons and Wilmonts, met on the top of the hill behind the church, built a platform between two trees, and held a religious meeting. This small gathering, and the statement that it was pleasant to worship on the . . . — Map (db m16995) HM
Georgia (Banks County), Homer — 006-5 — Nails Creek Baptist Church
Nails Creek Baptist Church, the first Baptist Church in Banks County, was established February 11, 1787. It was the Mother Church of Middle River, Grove Level and Indian Creek. Many descendants of its charter members are active in the work of the . . . — Map (db m14473) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Bethlehem — Bethlehem United Methodist Church
Oldest Methodist Church in Barrow County, organized in the 1780’s. Services first held two miles N.E. in log house. In 1790 a church was built nearby. The present site was originally a camp ground with an arbor, tents & cottages for camp meetings. . . . — Map (db m46843) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Hoschton — Bethabra Baptist Church
Clayborn Dalton built an arbor for public Worship across Mulberry River in Jackson County in the early 1800’s. It was called “Dalton’s Stand”. In 1813 the church was moved on this side of Mulberry River near the Maynard Cemetery. Rev. . . . — Map (db m16125) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Statham — Statham House
Built circa 1850. Owned by M. John C. Statham. He provided homes for widows of Civil War Veterans; donated land for right-of-way of railroad; streets for town, and a lot for a Methodist Church -- now the city cemetery. Statham, incorporated Dec. 20, . . . — Map (db m17348) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Wiinder — William PentecostBorn Nov. 4, 1762 – Died Jan. 27, 1839
Served 3 years in Revolutionary War from Dinwiddie Co., Va. in Buford’s Detachment. Lost an arm at Waxhaws, May 29, 1780. Remembered as successful business man, educator and civic worker, but most outstanding as devout Methodist minister. . . . — Map (db m19763) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — Concord Methodist Cemetery
In 1836 Byrd Betts, Pioneer Steward of the Concord Methodist Church, later to become the First Methodist Church of Winder, gave 10 acres land for the church and cemetery. Those known buried here. Susan, Wife of S. E. Beddingfield, 1829 - . . . — Map (db m17407) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — 007-1 — Fort Yargo<------<<<<
This remarkably preserved log blockhouse was built in 1793, according to historians. There are several references to Fort Yargo as existing prior to 1800. Its location is given as three miles southwest of “Jug Tavern,” original name for . . . — Map (db m22396) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — Rockwell Universalist Church
Organized 1839 -- second oldest Universalist Church in Georgia. Located here near original site of Rockwell School, oldest school in this section, and Rockwell Masonic Lodge. Confederate Soldiers enlisted and drilled here 1861-1865. Church . . . — Map (db m19548) HM
Georgia (Barrow County), Winder — Winder's Most Historical Site
For years inestimable the CREEK INDIAN VILLAGE of SNODON stood here. In 1793 ALONZO DRAPER, HOMER JACKSON and HERMAN SCUPEEN and their families became the first white people to establish homes in SNODON. This same year SNODON became JUG TAVERN. In . . . — Map (db m17349) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-48 — Historic Trimble House<—2 mi.—<
About 2 miles N. is the plantation home of Augustus Crawford Trimble, pioneer settler, member of the Home Guard, and businessman of Adairsville. A son, serving in the 1st Georgia Cavalry under Gen. Joe Wheeler, engaged the enemy on the plantation. . . . — Map (db m12419) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Adairsville — 008-2 — Mosteller's Mills
Five miles NE on State Highway 140 - a notable plantation and manufacturing center of the 1860´s. The Federal 23rd Corps, left wing of Sherman´s forces [US] marching southward from Resaca, having crossed at Field´s Mill, Coosawattee River, enroute . . . — Map (db m13231) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Allatoona — 008-44 — Allatoona Pass
Allatoona was in pioneer days a travel hub, because ridges from east and south met here where it was fairly easy to cross the Allatoona Mountain range by winding over a low ridge, or pass. The Sandtown or Tennessee Road from the south, and the . . . — Map (db m13843) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-54 — Etowah (Tumlin) Mounds
For over 100 years Etowah Indian Mounds were the Tumlin Mounds. In 1832 Col. Lewis Tumlin came to Cass County (Bartow) and drew the land lot that contained the mounds. Col. Tumlin served as county sheriff from 1834 to 1840. As young soldiers, Gen. . . . — Map (db m13471) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — Etowah Valley Plantation
On this site from 1844-1879 stood the plantation of Maj. John Sharpe Rowland and Frances Lewis Rowland. The plantation comprised some 2,500 acres. Rowland’s Ferry was located just northeast of here at the mouth of Pettit’s Creek. The Rowlands also . . . — Map (db m68747) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-51 — Friendship Monument
The nearby marble shaft has the unique distinction of having been erected by a debtor in honor of his creditors. Losses during the panic of 1857 forced Mark A. Cooper, proprietor of the Etowah Iron Works, to offer this property for sale to satisfy a . . . — Map (db m11627) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — 008-50 — Mark Anthony Cooper's Iron Works
These ruins of an old iron furnace built by Moses Stroup are all that remain of Cooper's Iron Works, developed by Mark Anthony Cooper, pioneer industrialist, politician, and farmer. Cooper was born in 1800 near Powelton, Ga. Graduating from S.C. . . . — Map (db m56319) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — Pierce Manning Butler Young, (1836-1896)
PMB Young was born in Spartanburg, S.C., on November 15, 1836. His parents were Dr. Robert Maxwell and Elizabeth Caroline (Jones) Young. The Young family came to Georgia in 1839. He graduated from Georgia Military Institute at Marietta in 1856; . . . — Map (db m21680) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cartersville — Tribute on Monument / 38 Names on Monument
Side 1 This monument is erected by Mark A. Cooper, Proprietor at Etowah, as a Grateful tribute to the Friendship and Liberality of those whose names are hereon inscribed, which prompted them to aid him in the prosecution and development of the . . . — Map (db m11630) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-21 — Site - Cassville Female College
A large brick structure erected 1853. May 19, 1864: Skirmishers of Polk´s A.C. [CS] withdrew from this ridge E. to Cassville when pressed back by Butterfield´s (3d) Div., 20th A.C. [US], from the Hawkins Price house. Battery C, 1st Ohio Lt. Art., . . . — Map (db m13941) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-22 — Site - Cherokee Baptist College
On Chapman Hill; a school for boys established Jan. 1854. A large three-story brick bldg. flanked by two-story wings. Burned 1856; rebuilt 1857, destroyed by Federal forces Oct. 12, 1864. This, & the Methodist Female College 3/4 mi. N.E., were the . . . — Map (db m13942) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — Site of CassvilleNamed For Lewis Cass
County seat Cass County 1832-1861. First decision Supreme Court of Georgia, 1846. Name changed to Manassas 1861. Town burned by Sherman 1864 and never rebuilt. — Map (db m12359) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Cassville — 008-17 — Town Of Cassville
In this valley was once situated the proud town of Cassville, begun in July 1833, as the seat of justice for Cass County and soon the center of trade and travel in the region recently comprising the Cherokee Nation. Both the county and town where . . . — Map (db m12371) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-8 — Historic Price House
2.5 mi. N.E. is the antebellum house of Col. Hawkins F. Price; State Senator 1857-1865; Mem. Ga. Secession Convention. A landmark of military operations near Cassville, where both Gen. Daniel Butterfield & Gen. Hooker (20th A.C.) [US] had . . . — Map (db m13497) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-49 — Kingston Methodist Church
The original church, with another name and at another location, was built in 1845, rebuilt in Kingston in 1854, and dedicated by Rev. Lovick Pierce, a leading preacher of the nation and father of Bishop George F. Pierce. The only church remaining . . . — Map (db m13537) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Kingston — 008-32 — Spring Bank
Ante-bellum plantation and residence of the Rev. Charles Wallace Howard, where he established a private school. May 18, 1864. Hardee´s A.C. [CS] moved from Adairsville to Kingston on this road enroute to Cass Station. May 19, the 4th and 14th A.C. . . . — Map (db m13195) HM
Georgia (Bartow County), Rydal — Old Pine Log Indian Town
Pine Log Town, located on Pine Log Creek in the flat fields slightly over a half mile east of Oak Hill Church north of GA 140, (in Pine Log, Georgia), extended almost a mile along the creek. The lots were 293, 294, 295,296, 317, 318, 284,and 283, in . . . — Map (db m13190) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-6 — Birthplace of Sidney Lanier
Sidney Lanier, poet, linguist, musician, mathematician & lawyer, was born in this cottage, Feb. 3, 1842. He graduated from Oglethorpe Univ. then at Milledgeville, served as a private in the Confederate Army and was captured while commanding a . . . — Map (db m664) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — John Basil Lamar
Col. John Basil Lamer, aide-de-camp of General Howell Cobb, his brother-in-law and close friend, was mortally wounded on September 14, 1862 while vainly trying to rally Cobb’s Brigade at Crampton’s Gap, Maryland. After temporary burial in Charles . . . — Map (db m25121) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 011-23 — Mulberry Street Methodist Church
This church, organized in 1826, is on land deeded to it by the Georgia Legislature in the same year. In 1828, the first church building in Macon was erected on this site. The first appointed pastor was Thomas Darley, who had been ordained by Bishop . . . — Map (db m29210) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — 11-1 — The First Baptist Church of Christat Macon
This church was founded in 1826 as the city’s first Baptist congregation. It was first located at the site of the present Bibb County Courthouse. The fourth and final move, to this site, occurred in 1883 and the current building was dedicated in . . . — Map (db m23046) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Grooverville — 014-10 — Grooverville Methodist Church
This church had its beginning in 1832, on the plantation of William H. Ramsey, about 4 1/2 miles Southwest of here. There being no Methodist services in the vicinity at the time he and his family moved to this area. Mr. Ramsey built a brush-arbor . . . — Map (db m10025) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Grooverville — 014-4 — Liberty Baptist Church
Between 1837 and 1841 the Baptists in this section were stirred on Missions, Sunday Schools and ministerial support. In 1841 the Ocklochnee anti-Missionary Baptist Assn. passed a ruling to dismiss members believing in the “new fangled . . . — Map (db m10172) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Morven — 014-3 — Mount Zion Camp Ground
The first Camp Meeting was held on this site in 1828 by a "few scattered Methodists" before any Methodist Church in the area was organized. William Hendry, William Blair and Hamilton W. Sharpe, as a committee, selected the site. Rev. Adam Wyrick was . . . — Map (db m14761) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Morven — 014-6 — Old Coffee Road<–––– ––––>
The Old Coffee Road, first vehicular and postal route of this area, passed here running southwestward from the Ocmulgee River via today´s Lax, Nashville, Cecil, Barwick, and Thomasville to the Florida line above Tallahassee. The thoroughfare was . . . — Map (db m14751) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Nankin — 014-7 — Columbia Primitive Baptist Church
Columbia Primitive Baptist Church was formally constituted on the first Sunday in October, 1833, after serving as an arm of Bethany Church more than a year. Moses Dees was the first delegate from Columbia to the annual meeting of the mother church, . . . — Map (db m14749) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Pavo — 014-8 — Bethel Primitive Baptist Church
Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, the second Baptist Church to be organized in the area of old Lowndes County, was constituted September 2, 1826. The organizing Presbytery were: Elders Benjamin Manning. Matthew Albritton and Henry Melton, with . . . — Map (db m51514) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-9 — Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church
Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church about 4 miles Southwest of here, was constituted November 29, 1834. The charter members included: William T. Rushing, his wife, Belinda; Asa Geiger, his wife, Nancy; William Jones, his wife, Elizabeth; James . . . — Map (db m14747) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-1 — Brooks County
This county created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 11, 1858, is named for Preston Smith Brooks, zealous defender of States Rights. Born in S.C. Aug. 6, 1819, Brooks served in the Mexican War & in Congress. He died June 27, 1857. The first County . . . — Map (db m26977) HM
Georgia (Brooks County), Quitman — 014-5 — Old Coffee Road<–––– ––––>
The Old Coffee Road, earliest vehicular and postal route of this area, crossed here, leading southwestward from the Ocmulgee River via today´s Lax, Nashville, Cecil, Barwick and Thomasville to the Florida Line. The thoroughfare was opened by . . . — Map (db m14763) HM
Georgia (Bulloch County), Arcola — 016-2A — John Abbot (1751-1839)Ornithologist, Entomologist, Artist »—1/3 Mi.→
In the old McElveen Cemetery, one-third of a mile northeast of this marker, is the grave of John Abbot, pioneer naturalist of Georgia. Abbot was born in London June 1, 1751, and in early youth became devoted to the study and delineation of insects. . . . — Map (db m24018) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 017-3 — Botsford Church - 1773—→
Botsford Church, Constituted in 1773 by the Rev. Edmund Botsford, was the second Baptist church in Georgia. Originally located 25 miles below Augusta, known as the New Savannah Church, it was moved about 10 miles to this place after the Revolution. . . . — Map (db m13116) HM
Georgia (Calhoun County), Morgan — 019-1 — Calhoun County
This county, created by Act of the Legislature Feb. 20, 1854, is named for John C. Calhoun, famed South Carolina Statesman, who resigned as Vice President of the United States in 1832 to return to the U.S. Senate and defend States Rights in debates . . . — Map (db m27052) HM
Georgia (Camden County), Kings Bay — 020-12 — Tabby Sugar Works of John Houston McIntosh
These are the ruins of a tabby sugar works built by John Houston McIntosh at New Canaan Plantation soon after 1825. In his sugar house McIntosh installed what was, according to Thomas Spalding, the first horizontal cane mill worked by cattle power. . . . — Map (db m21289) HM
Georgia (Camden County), Kingsland — 20-1 — Treaty of Coleraine
On June 29, 1796, this Treaty was signed ¼ mile south of here near Indian Agent James Seagrove’s home, a trading post and garrison of Federal troops on the St. Marys River. The meeting included representatives of the United States and the State of . . . — Map (db m60207) HM
Georgia (Camden County), Saint Marys — 020-1 — First Presbyterian Church
Built by public subscription as a place of divine worship for inhabitants of St. Marys and its vicinity. Reverend Horace Southworth Pratt was ordained and installed as the first pastor by the Presbytery of Georgia in June, 1822. Incorporated under . . . — Map (db m21062) HM
Georgia (Camden County), St Marys — 020-11 — St. Marys Methodist Church Established 1799-1800Celebrated Sesqui-Centennial 1949
This church is the oldest religious organization in the city, although not the oldest church building. George Clark served as the first missionary to the people here in 1792. John Garvin was the first appointed Pastor to St. Marys in 1799. Methodist . . . — Map (db m23044) HM
Georgia (Camden County), St. Marys — 020-10 — City of St. Marys
This town was built on the north bank of the St. Marys River at a place called Buttermilk Bluff. The original tract of land, containing 1620 acres, was purchased by the proprietors for laying out the Town of St. Marys for Jacob Weed for thirty eight . . . — Map (db m14180) HM
Georgia (Camden County), St. Marys — 020-4 — First Pecan Trees Grown Here About 1840
Grown from pecan nuts found floating at sea by Capt. Samuel F. Flood and planted by his wife, nee Rebecca Grovenstine, on Block 47. The remainder of these nuts were planted by St. Joseph Sebastian Arnow in the north half of Block 26. . . . — Map (db m14398) HM
Georgia (Camden County), St. Marys — 020-3 — Washington Pump & Oak
There were originally six wells one in each square, the only source of pure water for St. Marys, (until the tidal wave of 1818). On the day that the Father of the Country was buried at Mt. Vernon local services were also held throughout the . . . — Map (db m14178) HM
Georgia (Candler County), Metter — 021-2 — Old Sunbury Road← →
The route crossing at this point is the Sunbury Road, one of the longest vehicular thoroughfares of post-Revolutionary Georgia. It was laid out in the early 1790´s from Greensboro via today´s Sparta and Swainsboro to the town of Sunbury, a port on . . . — Map (db m13361) HM
Georgia (Carroll County), Bowdon — 022-2 — Last Land in Georgia Ceded by the Creeks
Bowdon is near the geographical center of the last land in Georgia owned by the Creek Nation and ceded to the U.S. This tract, approximately 550 sq. mi. in area, is 80 mi long and 10 mi. wide at its widest point. When Carroll County was . . . — Map (db m31329) HM
Georgia (Carroll County), Bowdon — 022-7 — Site of Bowdon College1857-1936
Bowdon College was Georgia’s fifth chartered institution of higher education and first coeducational institution. Bowdon was a frontier community of merchants and yeomen who nourished the growth of a school where earnest students of limited means . . . — Map (db m31328) HM
Georgia (Carroll County), Villa Rica — The Grove
In the mid-1600s, John Tyson traveled from the British Isles to Virginia. Over the next 200 years, his descendents migrated to North Carolina and on to Georgia. Alexander, Clement, and Jehu Tyson and their mother Penelope settled this land in 1853. . . . — Map (db m10041) HM
Georgia (Catoosa County), Ringgold — 023-1 — Catoosa County
Created December 5, 1853, the county has an Indian name. Ringgold bears the name of Major Samuel Ringgold, who died of wounds received at the Mexican War battle of Palo Alto in 1846. Taylor’s Ridge, visible for miles, is named for the Indian chief . . . — Map (db m19268) HM
Georgia (Catoosa County), Ringgold — 023-7 — Old Federal Road
This highway is part of the Old Federal Road, an early thoroughfare that linked Georgia and west Tennessee across the Indian Country. It began on the southeast boundary of the Cherokees, in the direction of Athens, Georgia and led toward Nashville . . . — Map (db m12179) HM
Georgia (Catoosa County), Ringgold — 023-11 — The Napier House
Thomas Thompson Napier built this house in 1836 of heavy local timber prepared by slaves and finishing lumber brought by ox-wagon from Augusta. During the Battle of Chickamauga 20 wounded soldiers were cared for in the house by Mrs. Martha Harris . . . — Map (db m13864) HM
Georgia (Catoosa County), Ringgold — 023-10 — The Whitman House
This house of handmade brick was built about 1863 by Mr. William L. Whitman, prominent merchant of Ringgold. After the Battle of Ringgold General U. S. Grant established his headquarters here. When he and his staff were leaving he offered Mrs. . . . — Map (db m9061) HM
Georgia (Charlton County), Folkston — Henry Roddenberry
Memorial to Henry Roddenberry Born 1803 – Died 1861 Son of George Roddenberry (1758 – 1850) A Soldier in the American Revolution Settled near Traders Hill about 1835 Indian War Mounted Soldier 1838 – 1839 A . . . — Map (db m27443) HM
Georgia (Charlton County), Folkston — 024-4 — Sardis Church<--- 2 mi. ---<<<<
Sardis Church, about 2 miles West on this Road, is the oldest church in Charlton County. Constituted some time before 1821, the first edifice was built in this area. The church was moved to or near its present site in 1840. The pulpit in this . . . — Map (db m27439) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Burroughs — 25-16 — Savannah-Ogeechee Canal
Chartered in 1824, the Savannah-Ogeechee Canal was constructed between 1826 and 1830 by African and Irish laborers who moved thousands of cubic yards of earth. A boon to Georgia’s economy, the canal moved cotton, rice, bricks, and natural . . . — Map (db m47921) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Port Wentworth — 025-78 — Indian Trading Post: Home of Mary Musgrove
During the first years after the founding of the Colony of Georgia in 1733 these lands (now owned by the Savannah Sugar Refining Company) were known as the "Grange" or "Cowpen" plantation. Along the Savannah River, about one mile East of this . . . — Map (db m12556) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 25-29 — Largest Slave Sale in Georgia HistoryThe Weeping Time
One of the largest sales of enslaved persons in U.S. history took place on March 2-3, 1859, at the Ten Broeck Race Course ¼ mile southwest of here. To satisfy his creditors, Pierce M. Butler sold 436 men, women, and children from his Butler Island . . . — Map (db m15838) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 25-41 — Old City Exchange Bell
This bell, which is believed to be the oldest in Georgia, bears the date 1802. Imported from Amsterdam, it hung in the cupola of the City Exchange from 1804 until a short time before that building was razed to make way for the present City Hall. . . . — Map (db m4913) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 3 — Savannah and the Slave Trade
Although slavery was illegal when the colony of Georgia was founded, it was a well established institution in other American colonies. Settlers were confronted with the economics to compete with slave labor. Carolinians produced cash crops with . . . — Map (db m19587) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 25-7 — Savannah Waterfront
The colony of Georgia began on Savannah's waterfront in 1733. The riverfront has always played an important role in Georgia, whether as a colonial port, exporter of cotton, or tourist destination. The first commercial house below the bluff opened in . . . — Map (db m4900) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — 025-5 — Sherman's HeadquartersGreen-Meldrim Mansion
General William Tecumseh Sherman used this house as headquarters from Dec. 22, 1864, until Feb. 1, 1865. Charles Green offered the use of his home to General Sherman and his staff. Sherman's chaplain conducted the Christmas services in St. John's . . . — Map (db m8881) HM
Georgia (Chattooga County), Trion — 027-3 — First Cotton Mill In Northwest Georgia
Three Walker County businessmen, Andrew P. Allgood, Spencer S. Marsh and Col. W.K. Briers, officially organized the Trion factory Oct. 12, 1845. It has had few shut-downs since its first production in 1847. In 1858 an epidemic, in 1864 Sherman's . . . — Map (db m11460) HM
Georgia (Cherokee County), Canton — 028-4 — Cherokee County Gold
Cherokee County, located along Georgia’s gold belt, figured prominently in the gold rush of the 1830’s and 40’s. Several mines operated along a five mile area near the Etowah River in the northeastern part of the county, including the . . . — Map (db m21821) HM
Georgia (Cherokee County), Canton — 028-3 — Joseph Emerson Brown
Born April 15, 1821 in Pickens District, South Carolina, he grew up in Union County, Georgia. He taught to pay for his education and while teaching in Canton he read law at night, being admitted to the bar in August, 1845. He graduated from the . . . — Map (db m21891) HM
Georgia (Clarke County), Athens — Old Athens Cemetery
This site is the original burial ground for Athens and contains the remains of its earliest citizens. It is a part of the original tract of land purchased for The University of Georgia by Governor John Milledge in 1801. All people in Athens were . . . — Map (db m19707) HM
Georgia (Clarke County), Athens — 29-4 — Old College
Built in 1806 by Jett Thomas to the specifications of college president Josiah Meigs, Old College was the first permanent building on the University of Georgia campus. Originally named Franklin College in honor of Benjamin Franklin, the building . . . — Map (db m19515) HM
Georgia (Clarke County), Athens — 029-15 — Robert Toombs Oak
A majestic oak tree once stood on this spot and one of the University's most endearing legends also flourished here. Robert Toombs (1810-1885) was young, and boisterous when he was dismissed from Franklin College in 1828. Five decades later it was . . . — Map (db m11966) HM
Georgia (Clay County), Georgetown — New Lowell United Methodist Church / New Lowell School
New Lowell United Methodist Church Methodist Episcopal Church worship services were conducted in this area during the early 1840’s in a brush arbor. The original church, known as Lowell, was destroyed by fire during the Civil War. From 1865 to . . . — Map (db m23419) HM
Georgia (Clayton County), Jonesboro — 031-7 — Clayton County
Clayton County was created by Act of Nov. 30, 1858 from Fayette and Henry Counties. It was named for Augustine Smith Clayton, born at Fredericksburg, Va., Nov. 27, 1783, who moved to Georgia before 1800. A graduate of the U. of Ga., he was a lawyer, . . . — Map (db m18956) HM
Georgia (Clayton County), Jonesboro — Heritage Place1981
Historic Jonesboro, named in honor of Samuel Goode Jones in 1845, was founded in 1823 as Leaksville. Later Clayton County was created by the Act of November 30, 1858 from Fayette and Henry Counties, and Jonesboro became the County Seat. The town . . . — Map (db m18815) HM

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