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Abolition & Underground RR Historical Markers

646 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 396
Mary Ellen Pleasant Memorial Park Marker image, Click for more information
By Barry Swackhamer, March 18, 2015
Mary Ellen Pleasant Memorial Park Marker
California (San Francisco City and County), San Francisco — Mary Ellen Pleasant Memorial Park1814 - 1904
Mother of Civil Rights in California. She supported the western terminus of the underground railway for fugitive slaves, 1850-1865. This legendary pioneer once lived on this site and planted these six trees. Placed by the San . . . — Map (db m85557) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Farmington — Farmington and the Freedom Trail
Known in the 1800’s as “the hub” of Connecticut’s Underground Railroad, Farmington was home to an active group of prominent and outspoken abolitionists, several of whom were involved in state, national and international anti-slavery . . . — Map (db m95984) HM
Connecticut (Hartford County), Hartford — John Haynes
John Haynes 1594 – 1654 Of Copford Hall. Essex England. Third Governor of Massachusetts. A founder of this commonwealth & its first Governor. A lover of religious liberty. A man trusted and honored. Near this place he was buried & by . . . — Map (db m44068) HM
Connecticut (Middlesex County), Middletown — The Abolitionist Movement
The Abolitionist Movement On this site, on a spring evening in 1834, a violent mob descended on a small group of Middletown residents who had come together to work towards abolishing slavery. The abolitionists, both black and white citizens, were . . . — Map (db m71118) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-41 — Camden
Founded 1783 on the tract “Brecknock” by Daniel Mifflin and settled largely by Quakers. Once called Piccadilly and Mifflins Cross Roads. Incorporated 1852, it was a center of anti-slavery sentiment. Several homes were by tradition stops . . . — Map (db m39508) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-73 — Camden Friends Meeting
Burial Place of John Hunn This house of worship, built in 1805, was first a Preparative Meeting under the care of Motherkiln (Murderkill) Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). In 1830, Camden Monthly Meeting was formed by . . . — Map (db m39513) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — John Hunn1814 - 1894 — Quaker Abolitionist
Chief engineer of the Underground Rail Road in the State of Del. and the richest man in Del. He was convicted and fined in 1846 by the U.S. Dist. Court, later he was fined twice for $10,000.00 each by Del. but was advised the fines wouldn't be . . . — Map (db m39514) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Magnolia — KC-91 — Warner Mifflin1745 - 1798
A native of Virginia's Eastern Shore, Mifflin came to Delaware as a young man. Born into a slaveholding Quaker family, he manumitted his own slaves in 1774-75 and later became one of America's foremost abolitionists of the 18th century. As an elder . . . — Map (db m39456) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — NC-210 — Former Site of the Alston and Hunn Farms
Near this location were the farms of John Alston (1794-1872) and John Hunn (1818-1894), cousins who shared the Quaker faith and were well documented operatives on Delaware's Underground Railroad. John Alston sometimes employed fugitives as laborers . . . — Map (db m88341) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Odessa — NC-90 — Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House
Believed to be one of the smallest Quaker Meeting Houses in the nation, the Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House was built in 1785 by David Wilson and presented to the Friends as a gift. Local tradition identifies this structure as a stop on the . . . — Map (db m10308) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Smyrna — NC-89 — Clearfield Farm
Built in the mid-eighteenth century by Captain David Clark, Clearfield Farm was the home of his grandson John Clark (1761 -1821), Governor of Delaware from 1817 -1820. John Clark served as Colonel in the Delaware Militia and as Justice of the Peace . . . — Map (db m69112) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-128 — Freedom Lost
By the late 1700s the institution of slavery was declining in Delaware. A changing economy and the active efforts of Quakers and Methodists had led to the manumission of many slaves and dramatic growth of the state’s free black population. Though . . . — Map (db m10950) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-84 — Gravesite of Bishop Peter Spencer (1779-1843)And His Devoted Wife, Annes
Born a slave, Bishop Spencer was the father of Delaware’s independent Black church movement. In 1813, he founded the Union Church of Africans, presently known as the African Union Methodist Protestant Church. The mother AUMP church . . . — Map (db m2607) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-76 — Meeting House 1816Religious Society of Friends
Grew from New-Wark Meeting established 1682. Present house is third in this vicinity. Friends School begun here in 1748 has operated continuously. Among 3,000 buried in yard are founders of Wilmington, John Dickinson, "Penman of the Revolution," and . . . — Map (db m10943) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-88 — Thomas GarrettStationmaster on the Underground Railroad
Born August 21, 1789, in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, Garrett came to Wilmington in 1822. A prominent merchant, his home and business were located nearby on Shipley Street. Garrett was committed to the anti-slavery efforts of his Quaker faith. He is . . . — Map (db m67356) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-125 — Wilmington Friends MeetingBurial Place of Thomas Garrett
The first Meeting House on this site was built in 1738. It was replaced in 1748 when a larger building was constructed. The old Meeting House was then converted into a school. Known as Wilmington Friends School, it was relocated to a new facility in . . . — Map (db m10941) HM
District of Columbia, Washington — Frederick Douglass 1817 - 1895The Extra Mile — Points of Light Volunteer Pathway
A Famed orator and writer Frederick Douglass was also a key architect of the movement that ended slavery, the very institution into which he was born. Even after his goal to abolish slavery was achieved, Douglass persisted in his struggle for . . . — Map (db m92084) HM
District of Columbia, Washington — 336 — From 1890 to 1910Dupont Circle — Diverse Visions / One Neighborhood
From 1890 to 1910, some of the nation’s finest architects built mansions at or near Dupont Circle in Queen Anne, Richardsonian Romanesque, Italian Renaissance or Colonial Revival style. Wealthy couples living elsewhere built most of the early . . . — Map (db m89393) HM
District of Columbia, Washington — Harriet Tubman circa 1820 - 1913The Extra Mile — Points of Light Volunteer Pathway
Harriet Tubman escaped a life of slavery only to return south, at her own peril, time and again, to lead more than 300 fugitive slaves through the Underground Railroad to safety and freedom. After the Civil War, Tubman raised money to clothe and . . . — Map (db m91877) HM
District of Columbia, Washington — 18 — The Sage of AnacostiaAn East-of-the River View — Anacostia Heritage Trail
This imposing property once belonged to Anacostia’s most famous resident: Frederick Douglass. After escaping slavery as a young man, Douglass rose to become a distinguished abolitionist, writer, publisher, and orator. By the 1860s Douglass was one . . . — Map (db m88723) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Anacostia — Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
Also known as Cedar Hill, this site encompasses the estate owned by Frederick Douglass from 1877 until his death in 1895. In honor of Douglass’ work as an author, orator, abolitionist, statesman, and civil rights leader, this site is designated a . . . — Map (db m40846) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Capitol Hill — Freedmen’s Memorial Monument to Abraham Lincolnor Freedom’s Memorial
In grateful memory of Abraham Lincoln. This monument was erected by the Western Sanitary Commission of Saint Louis, Mo., with funds contributed solely by emancipated Citizens of the United States declared free by his Proclamation, January 1st . . . — Map (db m41617) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.3 — Asbury United Methodist ChurchCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
Stories of slavery and freedom, of struggle and achievement are woven through the history of this African American congregation. Founded in 1836, by the time of the Civil War Asbury United Methodist Church was the preeminent Black church in the . . . — Map (db m70316) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — W.4 — New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald SquareCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“The churches are needed as never before for divine services,” President Abraham Lincoln So said President Lincoln from his pew in New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. While other churches were occupied by the federal government . . . — Map (db m32926) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Downtown — .4 — The Roots of Freedom and EqualityCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
“It is known to you that events have transpired within the last few days, deeply affecting the peace and character of our community.” With these words, city officials tried to calm the angry mobs gathering on this corner in April . . . — Map (db m25271) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Foggy Bottom — Leonard A. Grimes(1815 - 1873)
Leonard A. Grimes, a Black man born free in Leesburg, Virginia, owned a residence on this corner from 1836 to 1846. In the 1830s, he owned a successful coach business transporting passengers in and around Washington. He also carried slaves . . . — Map (db m46970) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Metropolitan Wesley A.M.E. Zion ChurchThe Gate Way to Freedom
Organized 1832. 2nd Church Built 1833. Admitted to Philadelphia-Baltimore Conference, 1837. 3rd Church Built 1888. Relocated present site, 1956. Bishop Raymond Luthe Jones, Presiding Bishop, 4th Episcopal District. Dr. William B. . . . — Map (db m11042) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Old Soldiers Home — President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home — A National Trust Historic Site
President Lincoln and his family lived in this country home for over a quarter of his presidency. Escorted by his cavalry guard, Lincoln rode to the White House every morning either on horseback or by carriage, and returned here each evening to . . . — Map (db m52838) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Penn Quarter — e.2 — Ending Slavery in WashingtonCivil War to Civil Rights — Downtown Heritage Trail
To your right at the end of Indiana Avenue is Washington's first City Hall/Courthouse. Across Sixth Street is the H. Carl Moultrie I Courthouse, a successor to the original courthouse. The Old City Hall/Courthouse opened in 1822, with offices for . . . — Map (db m56124) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Shaw — Mary Ann Shadd Cary House
[Panel 1:] Mary Ann Shadd Cary House Has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance In commemorating the history of the United States of America. An African American . . . — Map (db m61813) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Southwest — 10 of 17 — Escape from SlaveryRiver Farms to Urban Towers — Southwest Heritage Trail
Before the Civil War, Washington was a slave-holding city. But many of its citizens–especially free blacks and abolitionists–assisted freedom seekers at locations known as stops on the Underground Railroad. The largest attempted . . . — Map (db m20605) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Micanopy — F-860 — Moses Elias Levy
Moses Elias Levy (1782-1854), a Moroccan born Jewish merchant, came to Florida after its cession from Spain to the United States in 1821. Before his arrival, Levy acquired over 50,000 acres in East Florida. In 1822, Levy began development on . . . — Map (db m93854) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Key Biscayne — Escaping to Freedom in the Bahamas
In the early 1820's, enslaved Africans, runaways, and "Black Seminoles" seeking freedom from slave catchers and plantation masters, secretly worked their way down to CAPE FLORIDA. They met with bold captains of sloops from the British Bahamas who . . . — Map (db m79723) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), St. Augustine — El Pueblo de Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de MoseFort Mose Historic State Park
Great Seal of the State of Florida:"In God We Trust" On the shore of Robinson Creek, 1/4 mile east of this marker, was the site of a Spanish mission for Indians left homeless during the Queen Anne's War. Since 1688, Negro . . . — Map (db m65579) HM WM
Georgia (Chatham County), Tybee Island — 25-32 — History of Emancipation:Gen. David Hunter and General Orders No. 7
On April 13, 1862, following the Union capture of Ft. Pulaski during the Civil War, Maj. Gen. David Hunter issued General Orders No. 7 freeing those enslaved at the fort and on Cockspur Island. Hunter, an abolitionist advocating the enlistment of . . . — Map (db m13830) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Douglas' Disciple
"I regard (Richardson) as one of the truest men that ever lived; he 'sticks to judge Douglas through thick and thin" (A. Lincoln, 1860). Douglas composed the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act. William A. Richardson, another Quincyan and Douglas' . . . — Map (db m58760) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Lincoln's 1854 Visit
On November 1, 1854 an incensed Lincoln attached the immorality of slavery in a speech at Kendall Hall. Lincoln was awakened from a five-bear political slumber by Douglas's Kansas-Nebraska Act, attacking it in a series of speeches in . . . — Map (db m58788) HM
Illinois (Adams County), Quincy — Search for Equality
"Who shall say, I am the superior, and you are the inferior?" asked Lincoln in July 1858. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates focused on slavery. During the October 13th Quincy debate Lincoln affirmed: "...in the right to eat the bread . . . — Map (db m58798) HM
Illinois (Bureau County), Princeton — Owen Lovejoy Home
This two-story frame structure was the home of abolitionist Owen Lovejoy, who was born in Maine in 1811. Lovejoy moved into the house in 1838, when he became a Congregationalist minister. He was leader in the formation of the Republican Party in . . . — Map (db m44351) HM
Illinois (Champaign County), Champaign — The First Congregational ChurchChampaign Historic Site
The First Congregational Church, built in 1855-56, was popularly known as the “Goose Pond” Church, because the site was once a water-filled area, home to flocks of wild geese and ducks. The church became a meeting center for numerous . . . — Map (db m31118) HM
Illinois (Coles County), Oakland — Home of Dr. Hiram Rutherford
This was the home of Dr. Hiram Rutherford, who was involved in 1847 in a case in which Abraham Lincoln represented a slaveholder. Rutherford and Gideon Ashmore harbored a family of slaves who had sought their help. The slaves belonged to Robert . . . — Map (db m30877) HM
Illinois (Coles County), Oakland — The Matson Slave Trial — Looking for Lincoln
Top Section Dr. Hiram Rutherford was a key person involved in Abraham Lincoln’s famous slave case, the only instance in his career where Lincoln represented the rights of a slave owner. Robert Matson brought slaves from Kentucky to work his . . . — Map (db m30867) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — First Protest Against Slavery1837
At the beginning of Lincoln's second term as a state representative, several southern legislatures were concerned that the Federal Government would abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. Most of the members of the Illinois Legislature . . . — Map (db m42490) HM
Illinois (Kane County), West Dundee — Duff House

This New England style farmhouse was built circa 1848, by Samuel Wilder to resemble his former New York State home. Robert and Lucy Duff purchased this property in 1868; however, historians claim they lived at this location during the Civil War . . . — Map (db m94312) HM

Illinois (Knox County), Galesburg — Lincoln-Douglas Debate
On October 7, 1858, Abraham Lincoln and Stephan A. Douglas met in Galesburg for the fifth of seven joint debates. From a platform erected along the east side of Old Main on the Knox College campus, Lincoln said: "He is blowing out the moral lights . . . — Map (db m37056) HM
Illinois (La Salle County), Ottawa — First Lincoln-Douglas DebateLooking for Lincoln
First Lincoln-Douglas Debate Abraham Lincoln's first heated exchanged with Stephen A. Douglas on Aug 21, 1858 in Ottawa was received coolly by his advisors. They insisted Lincoln had treated Douglas entirely too "tenderly." . . . — Map (db m65302) HM
Illinois (La Salle County), Ottawa — Lincoln and Douglas Debate
. . . — Map (db m65297) HM
Illinois (La Salle County), Ottawa — The First Lincoln-Douglas Debate
On August 21, 1858, the first of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln and United States Senator Stephen A. Douglas took place in this park. Approximately 10,000 people gathered to hear the two candidates discuss the question of slavery in America. . . . — Map (db m65299) HM
Illinois (La Salle County), Ottawa — Washington SquareSite of First Lincoln-Douglas Debate
On August 21, 1858, the first of the famous debates between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas was held in Washington Square. Here ten thousand heard the two candidates debate for a seat in the United States Senate. Principally, the great . . . — Map (db m65325) HM
Illinois (Lake County), Gurnee — The Mother Rudd BarnHistoric Garden — 1840 s
The Mother Rudd Home is the oldest building in Warren Township. It served as a stagecoach stop, inn, tavern and post office. After the organization of the township in 1850, it was the official town hall and all caucuses and elections were held here. . . . — Map (db m55519) HM
Illinois (Macon County), Decatur — Let Us All Be United
By 1856 Abraham Lincoln had realized that his former political party, the Whigs, was in ruins. The political landscape had changed to the point that Lincoln accepted an invitation to attend an Anti-Nebraska Editors Convention held at the . . . — Map (db m56884) HM
Illinois (McLean County), Bloomington — The Lost Speech
Horace Greeley's New York Tribune reported on the Bloomington convention for its national readership: "It was most emphatically a convention of the people, where all classes, opinions and shades of belief were represented---but all inspired . . . — Map (db m57458) HM
Illinois (Morgan County), Jacksonville — Lincoln and Slavery
Pictured in the crowd listening to Abraham Lincoln's speech is Joseph O. King, a prominent merchant who later became mayor of Jacksonville. He helped found a political group that agitated for the exclusion of slavery from the free . . . — Map (db m57653) HM
Illinois (Sangamon County), Springfield — The Underground Railroad in Lincoln's Neighborhood
The Underground Railroad refers to the efforts of enslaved African Americans to gain their freedom by escaping bondage. Acts of self-emancipation made runaways "fugitives" according to the laws of the time. While most began and completed their . . . — Map (db m48450) HM
Illinois (Stephenson County), Freeport — Second Joint AppearanceAbraham Lincoln & Stephen A. Douglas
The second round in a seven-round bout between political giants Stephen A. Douglas and Abraham Lincoln was held in Freeport on August 27, 1858. In what has become a legendary struggle, Lincoln and Douglas contested for a seat in the United States . . . — Map (db m93499) HM
Indiana (Boone County), Zionsville — Lincoln's Stop in Zionsville, Indiana
Abraham Lincoln enroute to Washington as President Elect on February ll, 1861 addressed the Citizens of Zionsville at the Railroad Depot which stood on this site. — Map (db m8326) HM
Indiana (Decatur County), Greensburg — 16.2007.1 — Donnell -V.- State, 1852
Side one: Luther Donnell was convicted in Decatur Circuit Court (1849) of aiding fugitive slaves, Caroline and her four children, to escape to Canada. In Donnell v. State, Indiana Supreme Court reversed the conviction, claiming that under . . . — Map (db m44752) HM
Indiana (Decatur County), Greensburg — 16.2008.1 — Escape of Caroline, 1847
Side one: Caroline and her four children escaped Kentucky slave owner October 31, 1847; they crossed Ohio River near Madison. After passing near here, Fugit Township black and white residents hid family close to Clarksburg. While hidden, . . . — Map (db m44743) HM
Indiana (Elkhart County), Bristol — 20.2007.1 — Graves et al v. Indiana
Side One: In 1847, three Kentucky men tried to capture Thomas Harris, fugitive slave in Bristol; a justice of the peace ruling freed Harris, who fled. In 1848, the Elkhart Circuit Court convicted the three men of causing a riot in 1847. In . . . — Map (db m30744) HM
Indiana (Floyd County), New Albany — 22.2004.1 — A Gateway to Freedom
As early as 1821, enslaved blacks seeking freedom crossed the Ohio River from Louisville to New Albany. Antebellum and Civil War periods brought more fugitives. Many freedom-seekers were aided by other slaves, free blacks, and anti-slavery whites -- . . . — Map (db m30841) HM
Indiana (Fulton County), Rochester — The Underground Railroad1850 - - 1865
In memory of Fulton County Citizens who harbored fugitive slaves on their way to freedom in Canada. In Indiana, the underground railroad began along the Ohio River in 1850. After the Fugitive Slave Law was passed requiring citizens to help capture . . . — Map (db m37667) HM
Indiana (Gibson County), Oakland City — 26.2005.1 — James Washington Cockrum
Side 'One' Born 1799 in North Carolina. Purchased land 1818 in Gibson County. Cockrum and Jacob Warrick Hargrove laid out the town of Oakland (now Oakland City) on January 15, 1856. Cockrum and his son William Monroe Cockrum, along with . . . — Map (db m47807) HM
Indiana (Hamilton County), Westfield — 29.2008.1 — Rhodes Family Incident
Side A: In 1837, an enslaved family of three escaped from Missouri; settled six miles north of here 1839 with name Rhodes. In 1844, Singleton Vaughn arrived at their home to claim them; family resisted until neighbors arrived. Vaughn agreed . . . — Map (db m27812) HM
Indiana (Harrison County), Corydon — 31.2008.1 — Oswell Wright
Front side Born in Maryland early 1810's. Bought land in Corydon, May 1849. In November 1857, Kentuckians arrested Wright and two white men, Charles and David Bell; they were indicted and jailed in Kentucky for aiding escape of fugitive . . . — Map (db m9615) HM
Indiana (Harrison County), Corydon — 31.2003.3 — St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church
Side one Free blacks and former slaves organized an African Methodist Episcopal congregation in Corydon by 1843. In 1851, church trustees purchased land in Corydon in order to build a church and for school purposes. In 1878, church . . . — Map (db m9752) HM
Indiana (Henry County), Greensboro — 33.1976.1 — Underground Station
Seth Hinshaw, (1787-1865), well-known abolitionist, operated a station of the Underground Railroad on this site, prior to the Civil War. He also operated a store in which he refused to sell goods produced by slave labor. In 1843, Hinshaw helped . . . — Map (db m63804) HM
Indiana (Jackson County), Seymour — 36.2008.2 — Alexander McClure
Side 'One' On April 15, 1860 at the Seymour railroad depot, a shipping box was damaged while being transferred; McClure was discovered inside and immediately identified himself as a fugitive slave from Nashville, Tennessee. The box had been . . . — Map (db m46663) HM
Indiana (Jay County), Balbec — A Station on the Underground Railroad
Tradition says Eliza Harris of Uncle Tom's cabin fame rested here in her flight to Canada — Map (db m45184) HM
Indiana (Jay County), Pennville — 38.1972.1 — West Grove
Early Quaker settlement established 1836; center of Underground Railroad activity. Meeting house erected here, 1840, on land donated by Enos and Margaret Lewis; used by Congregational Friends, by Spiritualist society, as school, community hall; . . . — Map (db m66818) HM
Indiana (Jefferson County), Madison — 39.2004.3 — Eleutherian College
(Side One) College developed 1854 from Eleutherian Institute, founded 1848. Thomas Craven and anti-slavery advocates in the area created and supported the institution for education of students of all races and genders. This structure, . . . — Map (db m74046) HM
Indiana (Jefferson County), Madison — 39.2006.2 — John H. and Sarah Tibbets
(Side One) The Tibbets provided assistance to fugitive slaves here in their home (now part of National Park Service, Network to Freedom); John piloted them to the next safe haven. Both were members of Neil’s Creek Anti-Slavery Society . . . — Map (db m74045) HM
Indiana (Jefferson County), Madison — 39.2004.2 — Lyman Hoyt
(Side One) Born in Vermont 1804. Moved to Jefferson County 1834, where he owned land and had several manufacturing businesses. Active in Neil’s Creek Anti-Slavery Society and in forming Liberty Party for abolition of slavery. He and his . . . — Map (db m74044) HM
Indiana (Jefferson County), Madison — Madison's Riverfront / Underground Railroad
Side A Madison’s Riverfront Once a bustling commercial and industrial area, Madison’s riverfront has greatly changed since the City’s founding in 1809. On these banks stood factories, mills, hotels and taverns, typical of . . . — Map (db m22775) HM
Indiana (Knox County), Vincennes — 42.2009.1 — Mary Clark
Side One: Born circa 1801, Clark, a slave, was purchased in Kentucky in 1814 by B. J. Harrison, brought to Vincennes in 1815, and indentured as his servant. In 1816, G.W. Johnston purchased her indenture for 20 years. In 1821, Clark and . . . — Map (db m23219) HM
Indiana (Lake County), Merrillville — 45.1949.1 — First Physician
Henry D. Palmer, M.D. (1809-1877) located at this site in 1836. First physician in Lake County, he was also counselor to the pioneers for 40 years and member of the underground railroad aiding escaped slaves. — Map (db m27716) HM
Indiana (Madison County), Pendleton — 48.2013.1 — Abolitionists Mobbed
(Side One) In 1843, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society sent speakers to New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana to hold "One Hundred Conventions" on abolition. When speakers encountered citizens with deeply held racist ideas, they were . . . — Map (db m69254) HM
Indiana (Marion County), Indianapolis — 49.2006.2 — John Freeman
In 1844, John Freeman, a free black, purchased land in Indianapolis. By 1853, he owned land in this area worth $6,000. In June 1853, a slaveholder claimed Freeman was his runaway slave. Freeman spent nine weeks in jail; he hired lawyers; claim was . . . — Map (db m1833) HM
Indiana (Marion County), Indianapolis — 49.2007.2 — Ovid Butler, Sr.
(Front): Born 1801 in New York; moved to Indiana 1817. Admitted to bar 1825; became influential lawyer. Settled in Indianapolis 1836. His opposition to slavery on moral and religious grounds was reflected in his political affiliations and . . . — Map (db m4644) HM
Indiana (Montgomery County), Crawfordsville — Elston Memorial HomeCol. Isaac C. Elston Home
Small Upper Brass Plaque - by Front Door: This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. United States Department of Interior. Large Middle - Brass Plaque In Memory of the Soldiers of the . . . — Map (db m9396) HM
Indiana (Montgomery County), Crawfordsville — 54.1995.1 — Speed Cabin
Site of house reputed to be a stop on the "Underground Railroad." Reconstructed cabin, which was portion of house owned by John Allen Speed, now located on grounds of lane Mansion. Speed, active in abolitionist movement, was Mayor of Crawfordsville, . . . — Map (db m3870) HM
Indiana (Parke County), Bloomingdale — Underground Railroad Station — Alfred & Rhoda Hadley
1850 —————— 1868 A memorial to Alfred & Rhoda Hadley and others of Bloomindale who maintained an Underground Railroad Station to assist fugitive slaves to Freedom. Parke Co. & . . . — Map (db m59730) HM
Indiana (Randolph County), Winchester — 68.2010.1 — Randolph County Quakers
(Side One) When this meeting house was dedicated 1898, membership in Quarterly Meeting of Friends at Winchester was largest in the world. Migration of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) into this area began 1814 with the arrival . . . — Map (db m69283) HM
Indiana (Ripley County), Milhousen — 69.2004.1 — Union Church
(Side One) August 12, 1843 Union Church organized as Freewill Baptist church at home of Harvey Marshall. Church covenant states: “We cannot receive slaveholders into the church nor those who believe that slavery is right.” . . . — Map (db m73987) HM
Indiana (Ripley County), Osgood — Abolitionists
A network of anti-slavery leaders involved families of Isaac Levi, a Revolutionary War veteran. He came to Claytown (Osgood) in 1832 from Vevay where he apparently was part of the Underground Railroad; his brother-in-law, John Ewing of Ohio . . . — Map (db m45940) HM
Indiana (Ripley County), Osgood — The Fugitive Trail
One of the main Underground Railroad routes came from Madison to the Ohio River north to Holton, Otter Village, and east to Osgood. It then followed the rail line east to Laughery switch, then turned north to Napoleon. So many fugitive slaves . . . — Map (db m45938) HM
Indiana (Ripley County), Versailles — 69.2004.2 — Stephen S. Harding
Side One Born 1808 Ontario County, New York. Moved with family to Ripley County, 1820. Prominent abolitionist and orator, delivering powerful anti-slavery speeches throughout the area, often against public sentiment. Was active in . . . — Map (db m45873) HM
Indiana (Switzerland County), Vevay — Historical Site - Switzerland County Courthouse
Top Martha A. Graham ( Drawing of the River Paddle-wheeler. ) Lower Section Designed in the Greek Classic style by David Dubach, Architect, and built by John Haley c. 1864, with restoration completed c. 1992. It is . . . — Map (db m46132) HM
Indiana (Switzerland County), Vevay — The Dungeon
A stop on the underground railroad bringing slaves to freedom 1862 - 1864 commemorated 1976 Vevay, Indiana This memorial placed in honor of the descendants of the Rayls and Pickett families in the Bicentennial . . . — Map (db m45896) HM
Indiana (Tippecanoe County), Westpoint — Underground Railroad
Site of station of Underground Railway used by Quakers during pre-Civil War days in smuggling slaves to Canada. Leader of the enterprise was Buddell Sleeper. — Map (db m34871) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Centerville — 89.2013.1 — George Washington Julian
(Side One) A political leader defined by his moral convictions, Julian (1817-1899) advocated for abolition, equal rights and land reform, during a period marked by slavery, Civil War, monopolies, and discrimination against blacks, . . . — Map (db m69282) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Dublin — 89.2003.1 — Indiana’s First Woman’s Rights Convention
A convention was called for by reform-minded Congregational Friends meeting at Greensboro, Henry County, January 1851. Convention held October 14-15, 1851 at Dublin adopted resolutions for political, social, and financial rights for women. Women and . . . — Map (db m270) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Fountain City — Home of Levi Coffin
1827 1847 This house was called the "Union Depot of the Underground Railroad," and more than 2000 escaped slaves were cared for here. Tablet placed by Wayne Co. Society of Indianapolis — Map (db m4482) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Fountain City — 89.2002.1 — Levi Coffin
(Front Side): Levi Coffin (1798-1877), a Quaker abolitionist, lived in Newport (now Fountain City) with his family 1826-1847. Moved from North Carolina because he and his wife, Catharine, opposed slavery. Advocated, and sold in his store, . . . — Map (db m4480) HM
Iowa (Cass County), Lewis — Fighting Slavery – Aiding RunawaysJohn Brown Freedom Trail — December 20, 1858 - March 12, 1859

Iowa assumed an important place in America’s Underground Railroad history when Missourians closed off the Missouri River to Kansas bound settlers. For Iowa residents involved in helping runaways, the work was a dangerous and illegal business. . . . — Map (db m93885) HM

Iowa (Cass County), Lewis — Lewis Freedom Rock Veterans MemorialRay "Bubba" Sorensen II

Hitchcock House —————————— In sparsely settled Cass County an entire company was enlisted in Lewis, 1862.

Company I 23rd Infantry . . . — Map (db m93805) WM

Iowa (Cass County), Lewis — Rev. George B. Hitchcock House

Rev. George B. Hitchcock House has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America

This property is listed in the . . . — Map (db m93862) HM

Iowa (Iowa County), Ladora — Historic Grinnell
Marker Front: Josiah Bushnell Grinnell, a native of Vermont, was the person to whom Horace Greeley gave his famous advice “Go West, young man, go West.” Grinnell took that advice and in 1854 founded the city that now bears his . . . — Map (db m33683) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Aunt Polly Crosby's Cabin Site
Aunt Polly Crosby, First Mother of the Church, Poplar Grove Baptist. Site of her cabin. — Map (db m57483) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Humboldt Underground Railroad
On the East Bank [of the Neosho River], escaped slaves traveled through caves and tunnels to secret Underground Railroad stations. — Map (db m57486) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — 11 — Atchison
On July 4, 1804, Lewis and Clark exploring the new Louisiana Purchase, camped near this site. Fifty years later the town was founded by Proslavery men and named for Sen. D. R. Atchison. The Squatter Sovereign, Atchison's first newspaper, was an . . . — Map (db m77888) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — "But I Can Fire a Pistol"
"But remember this, I am a girl, but I can fire a pistol and if ever the time comes I will send some of you to the place where there is [sic] 'weeping and knashing of teeth'...." Gene Campbell, in a letter to James Montgomery, . . . — Map (db m54075) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Western Hotel: Symbol of Strife
After the army sold Fort Scott in 1855, the infantry barracks located here (reconstructed in front of you) became the pro-slavery Western Hotel. The building across the parade ground directly behind you became the anti-slavery Free State Hotel. . . . — Map (db m36272) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Lawrence — John Brown and the Siege of Lawrence, September 14-15, 1856
On the afternoon of September 14th, 1856, the Free State settlement of Lawrence, Kansas Territory was threatened with invasion by an army of 2700 Pro-slavery Missourians under the command of Generals David R. Atchison and John W. Reid. Encamping . . . — Map (db m76325) HM
Kansas (Douglas County), Lawrence — Liberty Hall
The Herald of Freedom, Abolitionist Newspaper published on this site 1855-56 Site of Liberty Hall, Lawrence's first opera house 1870-1911 The Bowersock Opera House (Liberty Hall), built in 1912 Designed by Samuel B. Tarbet & Co. . . . — Map (db m54573) HM
Kansas (Elk County), Elk Falls — 112 — Prudence Crandall
In 1831, Prudence Crandall, educator, emancipator, and human rights advocate, established a school which in 1833, became the first Black female academy in New England at Canterbury, Connecticut. This later action resulted in her arrest and . . . — Map (db m57960) HM
Kansas (Elk County), Elk Falls — Prudence Crandall
The State of Connecticut proudly joins the State of Kansas in honoring the lifetime achievements of Prudence Crandall, educator and champion of human rights. Crandall’s courage and determination serve as examples of all who face seemingly . . . — Map (db m57961) HM
Kansas (Jackson County), Holton — Edward D. Holton
Businessman • Philanthropist Abolitionist Holton • Kansas Est. 1857 — Map (db m63874) HM
Kansas (Jackson County), Netawaka — 17 — Battle of the Spurs
Just before Christmas, 1858, John Brown "liberated" eleven slaves in Missouri. He hid them in a covered wagon and circled north on the underground railway toward Nebraska and freedom. En route a Negro baby was born. Late in January they reached . . . — Map (db m53291) HM
Kansas (Jefferson County), Valley Falls — 13 — Battle of Hickory Point
In September, 1856, a band of Proslavery men sacked Grasshopper Falls (Valley Falls) and terrorized the vicinity. On the 13th, the Free-State leader James H. Lane with a small company besieged a party of raiders in log buildings at Hickory Point, . . . — Map (db m55362) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Leavenworth — Bleeding KansasHistoric Wayside Tour #12
"Each man carried a bowie-knife, a revolver, a pair of breeches, a shirt and a very don't-care a damn expression...The stews and brothels, the hospitals and poorhouses of the East can furnish thousands more of just such scabby, scurvy, scapegoats, . . . — Map (db m46709) HM
Kansas (Leavenworth County), Leavenworth — LeavenworthThe Oldest City in Kansas
Leavenworth was founded in June, 1854, although it was not incorporated until the following summer. During the territorial struggle which flared between proslavery and Free-State forces, the city was the scene of many incidents which contributed . . . — Map (db m71724) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Mound City — Fort MontgomeryReplica built in 2000

Original cabin/fort built in 1855 five miles west of Mound City. The original building was the second cabin owned by James Montgomery as the first one was burned by proslavery Missouri Border Ruffians.

The logs were placed vertically on the . . . — Map (db m93375) HM

Kansas (Linn County), Trading Post — 46 — Marais des Cygnes Massacre
Nothing in the struggle over slavery in Kansas did more to inflame the nation than the mass killing which took place May 19, 1858, about four miles northeast of this marker. Charles Hamelton who had been driven from the territory by Free-State men, . . . — Map (db m4359) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Trading Post — Marais des Cygnes Massacre State Historic Site Trail
A Nation at Odds The mid 1800s were a time of turmoil and tragedy in the U.S. The issue of slavery polarized the nation. It created a moral, political, and economic dilemma. The struggle over slavery ultimately led to the Civil War, splitting . . . — Map (db m39862) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Trading Post — Murder on the Marais des Cygnes
The bloodiest single incident in the Kansas-Missouri border struggles, 1854-1861, occurred May 19, 1858, when about 30 Proslavery Missourians seized 11 Kansas Free-State men near Trading Post and marched them to a ravine 225 yards northwest of this . . . — Map (db m39861) HM
Kansas (Linn County), Trading Post — Sounds from the past...hoof beats and heartbeats.Frontier Military Historic Byway
Pro- and anti-slavery forces made their way to this area on horseback and on foot in the fight over whether Kansas would be a free state or a slave state. Skirmishes, scuffles and screams could be heard in the woodlands nearby. The Marias des . . . — Map (db m33944) HM
Kansas (Miami County), Osawatomie — 50 — John Brown Country
Osawatomie - the name derives from a combination of Osage and Pottawatomie - was settled in 1854 by Free-State families from the Ohio Valley and New England. John Brown, soon to become famous for his militant abolitionism, joined five of his . . . — Map (db m69325) HM
Kansas (Miami County), Osawatomie — John Brown of Kansas
. . . — Map (db m4347) HM
Kansas (Miami County), Osawatomie — 6 — Old Stone ChurchOsawatomie Driving Tour
Built by Rev. Samuel Adair brother-in-law of John Brown Dedicated July 14, 1861 — Map (db m69315) HM
Kansas (Miami County), Osawatomie — Old Stone Church
One of the first churches in Kansas, this church was built by a Congregationalist group and is typical of the church structures built during pioneering days in Kansas. It was dedicated to public worship in 1861, and its first pastor was the . . . — Map (db m69319) HM
Kansas (Miami County), Osawatomie — 9 — Soldiers MonumentOsawatomie Driving Tour
Erected to honor the 5 men killed in the Battle of Osawatomie on August 30, 1856. Dedicated August 30, 1877 —————————— [Monument inscription reads] In commemoration of those who . . . — Map (db m69304) HM
Kansas (Nemaha County), Sabetha — 32 — The Lane Trail
Near here the towns of Plymouth and Lexington once stood as outposts on the Lane Trail, approximated today by US-75. Named for abolitionist James H. Lane, the trail was established in 1856 to bypass proslavery strongholds in Missouri and provide . . . — Map (db m52952) HM
Kansas (Shawnee County), Topeka — A Turning Point for Equality

Across the field in front of you stands the former Monroe Elementary School. Parents of six students that attended this school in 1949 participated in the Brown v. Board of Education lawsuit. On May 17, 1954, the US Supreme Court issued . . . — Map (db m81395) HM

Kansas (Shawnee County), Topeka — Constitution Hall -Topeka1855 -
Free State Capitol of Kansas Territory, 1855-1861 Used as the Kansas Capitol, 1864-1869 Constitution Hall is Topeka's oldest building. In October 1855, Free Staters held Topeka's first convention here, to organize a free state government . . . — Map (db m47297) HM
Kansas (Wyandotte), Kansas City — Quindaro Ruins Archaeological Park
West Inscription: Many battles punctuated the movement to establish and maintain Kansas as a free state during the Civil War period. The quest for freedom exacted a heavy toll and caused many the ultimate sacrifice including John Brown the . . . — Map (db m86331) HM
Kansas (Wyandotte County), Kansas City — John Brown
Erected to the memory of John Brown by a grateful people — Map (db m69455) HM
Kansas (Wyandotte County), Kansas City — Quindaro, Kansas1857 1862 — A Kansas City, Kansas Historic Site
Near this site was located the historic town of Quindaro, founded in 1856 as a port-of-entry for free-soil immigrants into Kansas. The principal founder was Abelard Guthrie, who named the town for his Wyandotte Indian wife, Nancy Quindaro Brown. . . . — Map (db m69458) HM
Kentucky (Boone County), Burlington — Passage To Freedom From SlaveryMemorial to the Undergrond Railroad in Boone County, Kentucky — Another Marker in Rabbit Hash
In memory of all the slaves in Boone County, those who helped them, and the slaves’ descendants who remember & honor them and their legacy. Dedicated 21 March, 2005 by the Problem Solving Team, a diverse group of students, grades five . . . — Map (db m79290) HM
Kentucky (Campbell County), Bellevue — Bellevue, Kentucky
Incorporated March 15, 1870, on part of original land grant to Gen. James Taylor, pioneer, for whose farm this city was named. A general in War of 1812, banker, and statesman, whose farm was an underground railroad station. President of the first . . . — Map (db m49115) HM
Kentucky (Franklin County), Frankfort — 2235 — Emily Thomas Tubman House
(Side A) Summer home of Emily Thomas Tubman, philanthropist and emancipator. Born in Virginia in 1794, she was reared in Kentucky as ward of Henry Clay. She married Georgia merchant Richard Tubman in 1818. A widow after 1836, she gave to . . . — Map (db m85105) HM
Kentucky (Jefferson County), Louisville — 2072 — Kentucky Fugitives to Canada
Thornton and Lucie (also called Ruthy) Blackburn were slaves in Louisville, 1830-31. Thornton was hired out to Wurts and Reinhard's store at 4th and Main. When Lucie was sold to Virgil McKnight, the two escaped by steamboat. They were claimed two . . . — Map (db m70442) HM
Kentucky (Larue County), Hodgenville — Slavery in the Valley
Abraham Lincoln most likely encountered slavery while living here as a young child in 1811, when Lincoln was two years old, this portion of Kentucky was part of Hardin County. At the time, there were 1,007 slaves in Hardin County, compared to 1,627 . . . — Map (db m60024) HM
Kentucky (Madison County), Richmond — 533 — "Lion of White Hall"
West of here is White Hall, home of Cassius M. Clay (1810-1903). For a half century, Clay was a "firebrand" in American life. Fearless abolitionist, publisher of anti-slavery paper, The True American, captain in the Mexican War, legislator and . . . — Map (db m67793) HM WM
Kentucky (Mason County), Maysville — Paxton Inn
The property upon which this Inn stands was acquired by James A. Paxton in 1810. Paxton and subsequent nineteenth century owners of this building operated it as an Inn. Lawyers and townspeople gathered here. In 1918, the . . . — Map (db m84141) HM
Kentucky (Mason County), Maysville — Underground Rail Road — Circa 1840
Prior to the end of the Civil War, escaping slaves sought freedom via the Underground Rail Road. Fugitives led by "conductors" traveled by darkness to refuges or "stations." Quilts often guided them, sometimes with the Drinking Gourd (Big Dipper) . . . — Map (db m83976) HM
Kentucky (Trimble County), Bedford — 1822 — Trimble County JailDelia Webster - Abolitionist
Old stone jail erected ca. 1850 on site of original jail; second story added in 1899. For some 133 years, until 1983, this building was physical symbol of law and order in Trimble County. Its most noted prisoner, ardent abolitionist Delia Webster, . . . — Map (db m65676) HM
Maine (Cumberland County), Portland — Charles F. EastmanConductor on the Underground Railroad & Entrepreneur — Portland Freedom Trail
Eastman (1821-1880) was barber, second-hand clothing dealer, mariner and hack driver. He was also a financial supporter of the Abyssinian Meeting House and School. He owned and operated several barber shops with his four sons, including one on . . . — Map (db m50425) HM
Maine (Cumberland County), Portland — Christopher Christian Manuel1781 - 1845 — Portland Freedom Trail
Activist, Barber and Musician Born in Cape Verde, Africa First President Portland Union Anti-Slavery Society — Map (db m50434) HM
Maine (Cumberland County), Portland — Franklin Street WharfPortland Freedom Trail
Landing spot for many passengers on the Underground Railroad and embarkation point for their transit to Canada and England. Anti-slavery sympathizers were well-organized to greet stowaways from Southern cargo vessels, find them safe housing in . . . — Map (db m20614) HM
Maine (Cumberland County), Portland — Home of Amos Noë and Christiana Williams FreemanPortland Freedom Trail
First full-time called minister of the Abyssinian Meeting House 1841-1852 Rev. Freeman (1809-1893) was an instructor in the school maintained for African Americans in the Abyssinian Meeting House. As conductors on the Underground Railroad, the . . . — Map (db m50428) HM
Maine (Cumberland County), Portland — Home of Elias and Elizabeth Widgery ThomasPortland Freedom Trail
Corner of India and Congress Street, known as a Station House on the Underground Railroad. The home was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1866. The Thomases were prominent in the Portland Anti-Slavery Society, begun in 1833, which also worked to . . . — Map (db m50429) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — 1781 Friends Meeting House
The Friends Meeting House is the oldest religious building in Baltimore. In 1781, the Patapsco Friends Meeting, formerly located on Harford Road two miles north of the Inner Harbor, moved to this site. In 1784 a group of Quakers established a school . . . — Map (db m6282) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Cherry Hill
Part of the city but green as a suburb, Cherry Hill is a distinctive African American planned community. Cherry Hill was established to provide housing for blacks who moved to Baltimore to work in industries during World War II. Originally it . . . — Map (db m6359) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Frederick DouglassAbolitionist / Orator / Author
Frederick Douglass was born into American slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore in February 1818. In March 1826, Douglass, a slave child, was sent to live in the Hugh Auld household at this location, from 1826-1831. Douglass periodically resided . . . — Map (db m2603) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Henry Highland Garnet Park
This is a community park developed by the Special Impact Neighborhood Improvement Program and the Department of Recreatoin and Parks dedicated to the memory of Henry Highland Garnet by the Henry Highland Garnet Neighborhood Council. Henry . . . — Map (db m6236) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Hugh Lennox Bond1828-1893
Stalwart supporter of President Lincoln and of Emancipation. Chief Judge in the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court, where he was nicknamed "The Curse of the K.K.K" for his harsh sentences. — Map (db m6462) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Mount Auburn Cemetery
Oldest cemetery for African Americans in Baltimore, founded in 1872 by Rev. James Peck, pastor, and trustees of Sharp Street Methodist Episcopal Church. Dating to 1787, the congregation served the community and was influential in the freedom . . . — Map (db m13540) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Mount ClareFreedom Seekers at Georgia Plantation — National Underground Railroad-Network to Freedom
In 1760, Mount Clare was built as the summer home of Charles Carroll, Barrister. Mount Clare was the center of Georgia, Charles Carroll’s 800-acre Patapsco River Plantation. The estate supported grain fields and grist mills along the Gwynn’s Falls, . . . — Map (db m61209) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Solo Gibbs Park
Solo Gibbs Park was created in 1979 when 1-395 was built. The 1869 Sachse Bird's Eye View Illustrated Map shows the once larger neighborhood where, since the late 1700s a free African American community lived, worked and worshipped along side . . . — Map (db m6356) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The First Unitarian Church of Baltimore(Unitarian and Universalist)
In 1817, when Baltimore Town boasted 60,000 inhabitants and Mount Vernon Place was still a forest, a group of leading citizens met in the home of Henry Payson "to form a religious society and build a church for Christians who are Unitarian and . . . — Map (db m7168) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Tyson House
Built by Elisha Tyson 1790 — Map (db m6120) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Dred Scott, 1700 - 1858Freedom Denied by the United States Supreme Court
Dred Scott was born a slave in Southampton, Virginia. His family was owned by Peter Blow who sold Scott to an army doctor named John Emerson. Dr. Demerson took Scott to live in the free states of Illinois and Wisconsin where, in 1836, Scott married . . . — Map (db m75677) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Roger Brooke Taney, 1777 - 1864Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court
Roger Brooke Taney was born in Calvert County, Maryland. After serving as attorney general of the U.S. and secretary of the Treasury, he was sworn in as chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 15, 1836. He served until his death in . . . — Map (db m75675) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Sparks-Glencoe — Gorsuch Tavern
At “19 mile stone” on York Road built in 1810 by Captain Joshua Gorsuch, a shipbuilder. The tavern was the meeting place of the Baltimore Countians who went to Pennsylvania to reclaim their slaves, thus bringing on the Christiana Riot of . . . — Map (db m2057) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Towson — Quarters #2 & 3Hampton National Historic Site — circa 1850
These two stone buildings, which replaced earlier log structures, housed slaves before the Civil War. After the abolition of slavery, they provided quarters for plantation and farm workers — Map (db m92522) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Caroline Courthouse-In the Shadow of JusticeHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Many facets of 19th century rural life focused on a county’s courthouse. Elected officials, lawyers, merchants, and ordinary citizens all had reasons to gather at the Caroline County Courthouse Square. For the enslaved and abolitionists, the square . . . — Map (db m79340) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Choptank River Heritage Center-Steal Away by RiverHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
The Choptank River was as entwined with the history of slavery and freedom on the Eastern Shore as any plantation. Slaves arrived by boat for auction and left the dock in the hands of a new owner. At wharves like this, black watermen played an . . . — Map (db m79342) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Moses and the HoundsHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Growing up as a slave near Easton, MD, Moses Viney often heard, “The wild geese come from Canada, where all are free.“ When he was 23 years old, Moses learned he might be sold to a new owner in the Deep South. To avoid this fate, he and . . . — Map (db m79341) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Revolution or Fraud?Emancipation in Caroline Co.
Maryland slaves were not freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, which excluded states that remained in the Union from its provisions. It was Maryland's new constitution, adopted by the narrow margin of 291 votes of almost 60,000 cast on . . . — Map (db m3389) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House-Living Their BeliefsHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
The Quakers, also known as Friends, who met in this Meeting House not only held strong opinions on the abolition of slavery and women’s rights, but they also acted on those beliefs.

After 1790, the Friends who gathered here refused membership to . . . — Map (db m79354) HM

Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — William Still Center-Families Divided & UnitedHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
William Still’s mother Sidney and several of his siblings lived in a cottage on the plantation where they were enslaved. Sidney escaped with her children to join her husband in New Jersey, but she was soon recaptured and returned to Maryland. . . . — Map (db m79313) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Greensboro — Greensboro-Threatened by IdeasHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
More than cargo flowed through commercial towns like Greensboro. Abolitionist ideas and freedom seekers on the move created tension within a society dependent on slavery.

Site of the northern-most bridge over the Choptank River, Greensboro . . . — Map (db m79356) HM

Maryland (Caroline County), Harmony — “Sailing Away to Freedom”-Glipin PointHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Glipin’s Point was one of the busiest wharves along the Choptank River in Caroline County where steamboats and sailing vessels transported people, timber, agricultural products, and seafood. It sat just upriver from Dr. Anthony C. Thompson’s . . . — Map (db m79311) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — Choptank Landing-Escape from Poplar NeckHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
While the Choptank River could pose a troublesome barrier to those without a boat, others used the river as a path to freedom.

Josiah Bailey, an enslaved logger and shipbuilder, rowed six miles up the river. His destination was Poplar Neck, . . . — Map (db m79172) HM

Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — Escape from Poplar NeckHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Harriet Tubman’s parents, Rit and Ben Ross, moved to Poplar Neck in 1847. Her father worked as a lumber foreman on Dr. Anthony C. Thompson’s 2,200 heavily forested acres. Harriet probably made her first escape from this place in 1849, and she . . . — Map (db m79173) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — Leverton House-Finding Safe HavenHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Refugees from slavery came here for temporary sanctuary.

Under the cover of darkness, they crept across these fields toward the home of Quaker Jacob and Hannah Leverton. The house, a rare, documented Underground Railroad station, still stands at . . . — Map (db m79303) HM

Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — Linchester Mill-Living DangerouslyHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Daily life at and around Linchester Mill provided fertile yet dangerous ground for those seeking freedom.

The mill, a general store, post office and homes at this site brought whites and blacks, free and enslaved, into regular contact. Freedom . . . — Map (db m79299) HM

Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — Mt. Pleasant Cemetery-Dangerous RendezvousHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
After Quakers sold their meetinghouse to the local black community in 1849, the new owners established Mt. Pleasant Methodist Episcopal Church. The original church building has since burned, but the modern day congregation still uses the . . . — Map (db m79178) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — The Underground RailroadSeed of War
Among the factors that contributed to the coming of the Civil War was the increasing animosity between Southerners and Northerners over the issue of slavery. The operation of the Underground Railroad to help slaves escape to the free North and . . . — Map (db m5411) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — Webb Cabin-Living FreeHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Common in the mid-19th century, this cabin is a rare survivor today. James H. and Mary Ann Webb built this one-room house in the 1850s, using materials found in the surrounding landscape. Hand-hewn log walls rest on a foundation of ballast stones . . . — Map (db m79305) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Ridgely — Adkins Arboretum-Slavery ArboretumHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
The forests and waterways of the Eastern Shore, traditional land of the Choptank and Nanticoke Indians, provided the backup for the austere home life, backbreaking labor, and dramatic escapes of enslaved blacks.

Hundreds of acres of white oak, . . . — Map (db m79355) HM

Maryland (Dorchester County), Bucktown — Finding Freedom
The Call of Freedom In the mid-19th century, 8,000 African Americans lived in Dorchester County. Roughly half were slaves; most of the rest worked as free laborers. Enslaved blacks, free blacks, and abolitionist whites worked together to . . . — Map (db m3959) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Bucktown — Harriet Tubman1820-1913
The "Moses of her People", Harriett Tubman of the Bucktown District found freedom for herself and some three hundred other slaves whom she led north. In the Civil War she served the Union army as a nurse, scout and spy. — Map (db m3956) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge-Taking Refuge from SlaveryHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
It is no accident that for years more fugitives escaped from slavery in Maryland than any other state—the 1850 census recorded 259 runaways. Location played a critical role in these escapes. Networks of black and white abolitionists helped . . . — Map (db m78815) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Finding Freedom
The Call of Freedom Dorchester County occupies a central place in the story of the Underground Railroad, the secret network of "stations" and "conductors" that sheltered and shepherded hundreds of enslave African Americans to freedom in the . . . — Map (db m3964) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Harriet Tubman Memorial Garden-Celebrating an IconHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
The local community, joined by others across the nation, honors its native daughter, Harriet Ross Tubman. Her memory endures through artistic expression in works of literature, music, sculpture, paint, photography, performance, and . . . — Map (db m79140) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Long Wharf-The RiverHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
As a deep-water tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, the Choptank River was a commercial artery of the Eastern Shore since colonial times. Cargoes of timber, tobacco, and farm harvests were hoisted by dockworkers to waiting ships.

During the early . . . — Map (db m78737) HM

Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Stanley Institute-Racing to FreedomHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
In October 1857, ten years before Stanley Institute was established two large groups of enslaved families successfully fled this area.

Caroline and Daniel Stanley and their six children escaped with Nat and Lizzie Amby and six others. Two weeks . . . — Map (db m78719) HM

Maryland (Dorchester County), Church Creek — Finding FreedomNational Underground Railroad Network to Freedom
The Call of Freedom Dorchester County occupies a central place in the story of the Underground Railroad, the secret network of “stations” and “conductors” assisting hundreds of enslaved African Americans to reach freedom . . . — Map (db m78804) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), East New Market — Faith Community UMC Church-Living a Double LifeHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
During the 1840s and 1850s, the locals knew Reverend Samuel Green as a literate, highly respected Methodist Episcopal preacher and community leader. His church once stood here on land donated in 1843 by free woman Sarah Young. While the building no . . . — Map (db m79150) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Madison — Madison-Preparing for FreedomHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Harriet Tubman spent her formative years in and around Madison, once called Tobaccostick. As a young woman, she worked for Joseph Stewart in his home and fields, until she joined her father Ben Ross in Stewart’s lumber harvesting operation. Tubman . . . — Map (db m78762) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Madison — Malone's Church-Ties that BindHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Harriet Tubman was born nearby on Harrisville Road at the Anthony Thompson plantation around 1822, where Thompson enslaved her father, Ben Ross, and about 40 other people. While Tubman’s roots began near here, she moved to Bucktown during her early . . . — Map (db m78765) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Taylors Island — New Revived Church-Family & Faith ConnectionsHarriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Founded in 1876 as Jefferson Methodist Episcopal Church, New Revived United Methodist Church was one of five African American congregations established in this vicinity between 1864 and 1880. These churches were rooted in faith communities that had . . . — Map (db m78782) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Dred Scott Decision
At the dedication of the Roger Brooke Taney Bust in Frederick on September 26, 1931, Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes concluded that “it is unfortunate that the estimate of Chief Justice Taney’s judicial labors should have been so largely . . . — Map (db m89047) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Churchville — Calvary United Methodist Church
Established in 1821 by Richard Webster and in continuous use, the Calvary United Methodist Church is a rare example of an early Methodist Meeting House. It is constructed of stone from a local quarry and retains its original floor plan, including a . . . — Map (db m1490) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Darlington — Lafayette at Colonel Rigbie’s House
Had Lafayette failed in quelling the mutiny of his troops here on Friday, April 13, 1781, the Battle of Yorktown might never have been fought. — Map (db m1286) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Alfred B. HiltonMedal of Honor Recipient
After the Emancipation Proclamation was issued in 1863, the U.S. Army recruited both free blacks and slaves. In August 1863, freedman Alfred B. Hilton and his brothers Aaron and Henry enlisted in the 4th U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) in Havre de Grace. . . . — Map (db m92020) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — Madison House
On August 26, 1814 this house provided shelter for President Madison and his official party during the British burning of the federal buildings in Washington, D.C. in the War of 1812. The following day, August 27th, the Secretary of State James . . . — Map (db m365) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Norwood — African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring
Sandy Spring has had large Quaker and African American populations since its founding in the 1720s. Encouraged by their regional and national Religious Society, most Sandy Spring Quakers had freed their slaves by about 1820, creating a . . . — Map (db m67633) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Silver Spring — William L. Chaplin Arrested!
On August 8, 1850 a hired carriage was forcibly stopped in the middle of Brookeville Pike (Georgia Avenue) near this spot by a Sheriff's posse from Washington, D.C. and a shoot-out ensued. The carriage was driven by William Chaplin, who was unarmed, . . . — Map (db m3969) HM
Maryland (Prince Georges County), Bowie — Hall Station
Abolition of slavery after the Civil War brought change to labor practices and subdivision of tobacco plantations, such as 108-acre “Collington Meadows”. R.C. Duval built a general store and post office ca. 1877 on part of the former . . . — Map (db m95821) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Bowie — Seeking Freedom
"Billy", who went by William Whitington, and "Clem", also known as Clem Hill, escaped together on June 21, 1815, as shown in the ad printed in the Washington, D.C. newspaper, Daily National Intelligencer on June 26, 1815 It appears that . . . — Map (db m69277) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Hyattsville — Osborne Perry Anderson
In Memory of Osborne Perry Anderson July 17, 1830   December 11, 1872 This dedicated and brave Christian traveled from Chatham, Canada to Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, to fight beside John Brown in quest to abolish slavery. He later . . . — Map (db m90964) HM WM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Oxon Hill — Emancipation in Maryland
On November 1, 1864, new provisions of the Maryland State Constitution brought freedom to the enslaved people of Maryland after 200 years of bondage. Article 24 stated, “That hereafter, in this State, there shall be neither slavery nor . . . — Map (db m75415) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — QueenstownDivided Loyalties
Queenstown, like most of the Eastern Shore in 1861, was a slaveholding community, and the impending conflict was regarded with concern and fear. When war erupted, families were torn apart because of their conflicting loyalities. It was not uncommon . . . — Map (db m3113) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Storm Blocks the Route to Freedom
In April 1848, the Chesapeake Bay's stormy weather doomed a maritime dash to freedom by 77 slaves from Washington D.C. Anti-slavery activist William L. Chapin had arranged for the schooner Pearl to spirit the 77 to New York and liberty. . . . — Map (db m62551) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Easton — Frederick Douglass1817 - 1895 — Negro Patriot
Attained freedom and devoted his life and talents to the abolition of slavery and the cause of universal suffrage. Visited England in 1845 and in 1859. Won many prominent friends abroad and at home. Was U. S. Marshall for the District of Columbia . . . — Map (db m87682) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), St. Michaels — Frederick Douglass
Born on Tuckahoe Creek, Talbot County; lived as a slave in St. Michaels area, 1833-1836. Taught self to read and write, conducted clandestine schools for blacks here. Escaped north, became noted abolitionist orator and editor. Returned 1877, as U.S. . . . — Map (db m3732) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Trappe — Nathaniel HopkinsSoldier from Trappe
This was the home of Nathaniel Hopkins, known affectionately in Talbot County as "Uncle Nace." He was born a slave near here in 1831. After leaving his owner, Percy McKnett, and serving in the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m3332) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Washington County JailFugitive Slaves Detained at the County Jail
An African American Heritage Report prepared by the Heritage Resources Group for the City of Hagerstown in 2002 identified the following historical incidents which suggest that the Washington County Jail was a significant site of activity along the . . . — Map (db m5676) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — “Forever Free”
The battle was over, but the two armies still faced one another. The Union army was still twice as strong. General Robert E. Lee, CSA "If McClellan wants to fight in the monring, I will give him battle again." Lee stayed at Antietam on more . . . — Map (db m6519) HM
Maryland (Wicomico County), Salisbury — Harriet Tubmanc. 1821 - 1913
"The midnight sky and the silent stars have been the witness of your devotion to freedom and of your heroism," wrote fellow abolitionist and Eastern Shore native Frederick Douglass of Harriet Tubman. A Civil War nurse, scout, spy, military . . . — Map (db m51021) HM
Massachusetts (Bristol County), New Bedford — Captain Paul Cuffe — New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park
Paul Cuffe (1759-1817) was a sea captain, merchant, philanthropist, community leader, civil rights advocate and abolitionist. The son of an African father and Native American mother, Cuffe was born on the island of Cuttyhunk, off the coast of New . . . — Map (db m77465) HM
Massachusetts (Bristol County), New Bedford — Captain Paul Cuffe's Atlantic World
London Cuffe sought support in London from the African Institution - a group that was committed "to stimulating trade with Africa, without itself trading, to promote African education and improved farming methods, and to be a . . . — Map (db m86901) HM
Massachusetts (Bristol County), New Bedford — Frederick Douglass
1818–1895 “For my part, I should prefer death to hopeless bondage.” New Bedford 1838-1841. — Map (db m1615) HM
Massachusetts (Bristol County), New Bedford — The Andrew Robeson House
Change of Address Andrew Robeson, whaling merchant and steadfast abolitionist, built this Federal-style house in 1821 on a lot on North Second Street, diagonally behind you. The estate, with its conservatory, gardens, surrounding elm trees, . . . — Map (db m77505) HM
Massachusetts (Bristol County), New Bedford — The Benjamin Rodman House
Wealth with a Conscience Early whaling merchants lived in elegant houses along this street. But by the time Benjamin Rodman built this Federal style home in 1821, many of his wealthy friends were moving uphill away from this shoreside . . . — Map (db m76980) HM
Massachusetts (Essex County), Lowell — Debating Slavery
By the late 1840’s, slavery was a defining political issue in northern cities. The topic was hotly debated in Lowell and created unlikely political alliances. Abolitionists like William Lloyd Garrison visited Lowell as early as the 1830’s and . . . — Map (db m66046) HM
Massachusetts (Essex County), Newburyport — William Lloyd GarrisonGarrison the Liberator
1805-1879 Garrison the Liberator Presented by William H. Swasey July 4 1893 Side 2 I solicit no man’s praise. I fear no man’s censure. The Liberty of a People. Is the gift of God and Nature Side 3 Neither God nor the . . . — Map (db m84824) HM
Massachusetts (Hampshire County), Florence — Entrepreneurs and Philanthropists
The major industries established in Florence during the 19th century were founded by reform-minded individuals who championed progressive causes throughout their lives. Their success in business was matched by their generosity in giving. Many of the . . . — Map (db m65757) HM
Massachusetts (Hampshire County), Florence — Florence Manufacturing
Florence, or Broughton’s Meadow as it was originally called, was one of America’s early manufacturing centers. In 1837, Samuel Whitmarsh established the area’s first silk mill along the Mill River. Importing silk worms fed on homegrown mulberry . . . — Map (db m65761) HM
Massachusetts (Hampshire County), Florence — The Anti-Slavery Community
Present-day Florence is the site of one of the most active centers of the anti-slavery movement in America. In 1842, members of the Northampton Association of Education and Industry, among them Samuel L. Hill and George Benson, established a utopian . . . — Map (db m65759) HM
Massachusetts (Middlesex County), Marlborough — The John Brown Bell
Symbol of a nation's efforts to obtain freedom and equality for it's people The John Brown Bell owned, and placed here, John A. Rawlins Building Association, acting in behalf of Akroyd Houde Post 132, the American legion, with the co-operation . . . — Map (db m56437) HM
Massachusetts (Suffolk County), Boston — Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment
[On the front of the monument, part of the relief itself]: Omnia Relinqvit / Servare Rempvblicam [Underneath the relief]: Robert Gould Shaw Colonel of the Fifty Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Infantry born in Boston 10 . . . — Map (db m20209) HM
Michigan (Branch County), Union City — 4 — Coldwater River & BridgeUnion City Heritage Water Trail
The first wooden bridge was built across the Coldwater River in 1843 with a steel bridge erected about 1895. The current bridge was constructed in the late 1950s. The Coldwater River starts from Coldwater Lake and meanders northwest 29.5 miles . . . — Map (db m95164) HM
Michigan (Calhoun County), Battle Creek — Sojourner Truth Memorial
In memoriam Sojourner Truth, born a slave in Ulster Co. N.Y. in the 18th century, died in Battle Creek Mich. Nov. 26, 1883 aged about 105 years. "Is God Dead" S.T.

Formal dedication Nov. 26, 1997, 200th Anniversary — Map (db m82266) HM

Michigan (Cass County), Cassopolis — L1352 — Chain Lake Baptist Church and Cemetery
In the 1830s southern runaway slaves bound for freedom in Canada came into Michigan near Cassopolis. In 1840, Cass County's Quaker community, which provided a haven for the fugitives, became an integral part of the Underground Railroad. Many free . . . — Map (db m64712) HM
Michigan (Cass County), Cassopolis — 30 — Freedom RoadMichigan Legal Milestone
Beginning in 1829, Penn, Calvin, and Porter townships in Cass County were settled by Quakers who migrated there. Free Blacks also settled there, and both groups lived in harmony. Blacks in Cass County enjoyed many rights, such as the right to own . . . — Map (db m79005) HM
Michigan (Cass County), Vandalia — Birch Lake Meeting House
Quakers from the mid-Atlantic region settled here during the 1830's. This is the site of the meeting house, built in 1856, which replaced a log cabin dating from 1837. The congregation contained many active Abolitionists, and this area soon became . . . — Map (db m68407) HM
Michigan (Cass County), Vandalia — S137 — The Underground Railroad
Vandalia, prior to the Civil War, was the junction of two important "lines" of the "Underground Railroad." Slaves fleeing through Indiana and Illinois came to Cass County, where Quakers and others gave them shelter. Fugitives seeking a refuge in . . . — Map (db m64724) HM
Michigan (Cass County), Vandalia — The Underground Railway
This boulder commemorates a station of the Underground Railway used from 1840 to 1850. It was the home of Stephen Bogue who aided runaway slaves on their way to freedom. — Map (db m68754) HM
Michigan (Jackson County), Jackson — S0015 — Under the Oaks
On July 6, 1854, a state convention of anti-slavery men was held in Jackson to found a new political party. Uncle Tom's Cabin had been published two years earlier, causing increased resentment against slavery, and the Kansas-Nebraska Act of May, . . . — Map (db m55195) HM
Michigan (Kalamazoo County), Kalamazoo — 44 — Lincoln at Kalamazoo
On August 27, 1856, here in this park, Abraham Lincoln, then an obscure lawyer, spoke to a rally for John Frémont, the Republican presidential nominee. This was the only time that Lincoln addressed an audience in Michigan. The event was . . . — Map (db m26760) HM
Michigan (Kalamazoo County), Schoolcraft — Underground Railroad House
This historic house was built in 1835 by Dr. Nathan Thomas, the first physician in Kalamazoo County. When asked in 1843 to assist escaping slaves from the south to reach Canada, he quickly agreed. Mrs. Thomas would provide food and arrange for them . . . — Map (db m68769) HM
Michigan (Oakland County), Farmington — 266 — First Quaker Meeting
In the 1820's, members of the Society of Friends played a key role in the settlement of several Michigan communities. Farmington was founded in 1824 by Arthur Power, a Quaker from Farmington, New York. In 1831, what was apparently Michigan's first . . . — Map (db m85104) HM
Michigan (Saint Clair County), Port Huron — Underground Railroad
Prior to the Civil War, African American slaves, in brave and desperate attempts to flee from slave owners in the Southern states, passed through Port Huron via the Underground Railroad. It was not a real railroad but a system of routes where . . . — Map (db m76050) HM
Michigan (Wayne County), Detroit — Detroit's Underground Railway Station
This tablet marks the site of Detroit's "Underground Railway Station"

A large brick building known as "The Finney House Barn," was located here and used as a depot for helping slaves gain freedom into Canada from 1833 until the Civil . . . — Map (db m91616) HM
Michigan (Wayne County), Detroit — S0069 — Finney Barn
Seymour Finney conducted one of the principal passenger depots of the underground railroad in the Detroit area. Finney, a tailor by trade, later became a hotel-keeper, and it was in this capacity that he assisted fugitive slaves in the era prior to . . . — Map (db m41190) HM
Michigan (Wayne County), Detroit — S0224 — Frederick Douglass - John Brown meeting
In the home of William Webb, 200 feet north of this spot, two famous American's met several Detroit Negro residents on March 12, 1859, to discuss methods of abolishing American Negro slavery. John Brown (1800-1859), fiery antislavery leader, . . . — Map (db m82809) HM
Michigan (Wayne County), Detroit — S0452 — George DeBaptiste Homesite
George DeBaptiste, a long-time Mason, and one of Detroit's most active and impassioned black community leaders, lived on this site during the 1850s and 60s. Born in Virginia about 1815, he moved to Madison, Indiana in 1838 and became involved in the . . . — Map (db m14479) HM
Michigan (Wayne County), Detroit — The Black Presence in Detroit
This hallowed land was early Detroit. First came the Indians, then Cadillac and French settlers with their Black and Indian slaves. These early Blacks were French speaking Catholics with French names. History recorded that our first Black inhabitant . . . — Map (db m33483) HM
Michigan (Wayne County), Detroit — The Gateway to FreedomEd Dwight - Sculptor
Until Emancipation, Detroit and the Detroit River community served as the gateway to freedom for thousands of African American people escaping enslavement. Detroit was one of the largest terminals of the Underground Railroad, a network of . . . — Map (db m33459) HM
Minnesota (Hennepin County), Minneapolis — Eliza Winston — Saint Anthony Falls Heritage Trail
By 1860 St. Anthony had become a favorite summer resort for wealthy southerners who traveled on steamboats up the Mississippi. Often they and their black slaves stayed at the Winslow House. One such slave was Eliza Winston. Slavery was illegal in . . . — Map (db m42714) HM
Missouri, St. Louis — Dred ScottBorn About 1799 — Died Sept. 17, 1858
[Front] Freed from slavery by his friend Taylor Blow. [Back] Subject of the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1857 which denied citizenship to the Negro, voided the Missouri Compromise Act, became one of the events . . . — Map (db m61970) HM
Missouri, St. Louis — Harriet Scottca. 1815 - 1860s
American Patriot Wife of Dred Scott Mother of Eliza and Lizzy Co-Plaintiff in the historic Dred Scott Case Your plea for equality was raised in obscurity, but in time it became the rallying cry of a people determined to abolish . . . — Map (db m61991) HM
Missouri (Buchanan County), Saint Joseph — A Path To FreedomFinding refuge across the river
Just south of Fort Smith hundreds of slaves escaped by crossing the frozen Missouri River during the winter of 1862-1863. Once in eastern Kansas, the slaves would move on to Iowa, Chicago, and other points north. Slavery in Missouri generally . . . — Map (db m79287) HM
Missouri (Cooper County), Boonville — James Milton Turner(1839 - 1915)
Born in slavery in St. Louis County, Mo. Freed 1843 Founder, Elias Buckner African-American School in Boonville 1869 Established 32 Missouri schools for African-Americans in 1870 Secured state funding for Lincoln Institute (later Lincoln . . . — Map (db m46016) HM
Missouri (Jackson County), Kansas City — Waterfront Town to Metropolis1856-1880
By May of 1854 the air was already electrified by the sizzling-hot debate of pro-slavery versus anti-slavery when Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Now, the western territory was open and available, and whoever settled Kansas first would . . . — Map (db m87452) HM
New Hampshire (Merrimack County), Concord — John P. Hale
Rear First Anti-slavery U. S. Senator He secured the abolition of flogging and the spirit ration in the Navy Born at Rochester 1806 Died at Dover 1873

Side The measure of my ambition will be full if when my wife and children . . . — Map (db m76427) HM

New Jersey (Bergen County), Fair Lawn — Slave House
On this site stood what was known as "The Slave House" Part of the Acker estate "Fair Lawn" from which the borough received its name. The "Slave House" was built much earlier than the 1865 Acker home and may have been used as a shelter for . . . — Map (db m63295) HM
New Jersey (Camden County), Cherry Hill — Free Wheel
Cherry Hill Township’s first public sculpture speaks to the history and heritage of the Croft Farm as both the site of a successful milling industry and a station along the Underground Railroad.

Created entirely of steel, the sculpture stands . . . — Map (db m79608) HM

New Jersey (Camden County), Cherry Hill — The Kay-Evans House at Croft Farm
The Kay-Evans house at Croft Farm dates to the mid 18th century when Isaac Kay, a prominent West Jersey settler, built a two-story brick dwelling to accompany his burgeoning milling establishment on the banks of the Cooper River. Subsequent owner . . . — Map (db m79602) HM
New Jersey (Camden County), Haddon Township — Saddler’s Woods
Welcome to Saddler’s Woods Historic Conservation Area. These woods are in the Newton Creek watershed and contain old growth ecosystems, restored woodlands, and wetlands.

Saddler’s Woods is named in honor of Joshua Saddler. Saddler was a slave on . . . — Map (db m79621) HM

New Jersey (Essex County), Newark — William Hayes Ward Home
This house, built in 1875, was the home of the Rev William Hayes Ward (1835-1916) from 1875 until 1914. A leading neo-abolitionist and Congregationalist clergyman, Ward joined the staff of The Independent (New York, NY), an abolitionist newspaper, . . . — Map (db m70127) HM
New Jersey (Mercer County), Trenton — Slavery – An “Odious and Disgraceful” Practice
From the onset of European settlement in North America slavery was a recognized institution and integral to the colonial economy. Although Quakers discouraged the practice, settlers of other religious faiths living in the Delaware Valley maintained . . . — Map (db m4273) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Convent Station — Boisaubin House
Built in 1790's by a French emigre on a campsite of the Continental Army, later, a station on the "Underground Railroad" — Map (db m18228) HM
New Jersey (Morris County), Pompton Plains — Giles Mandeville House1788
Built by Giles Mandeville for his bride, Sarah Roome. Later served as Pompton Plains' first post office. Since 1953 manse of First Reformed Church — Map (db m41901) HM
New Jersey (Salem County), Salem — Underground Railroad Station47 Market Street
From 1836 through the Civil War, this house was a beacon to enslaved African Americans escaping north. Here abolitionists Abigail and Elizabeth Good provided funds and supplies to the runaways for their journey to Freedom. — Map (db m88544) HM
New York (Albany County), Watervliet — The Nalle Rescue
The Nalle Rescue April 27, 1860 Near this site on Broadway, Charles Nalle, a fugitive slave from Culpepper, Virginia, was rescued from slave catchers by Harriet Tubman and citizens of Troy and West Troy (Watervliet), completing an . . . — Map (db m42015) HM
New York (Cattaraugus County), Franklinville — Cadiz
The first settlers arrived here in 1806 and this area was called Conrad's Mills. Later the name was changed to Cadiz. Dairy farming was the main occupation in this tiny hamlet within the Township of Franklinville. The famous Ontario Knife Company . . . — Map (db m86625) HM

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