“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

US Indian Wars Historical Markers

1471 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 1271
Autauga County Courthouse image, Click for more information
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
Autauga County Courthouse
Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — A County Older Than the State, Autauga County
Created in 1818 by an act of Alabama Territorial Legislature. Autauga Indians lived on creek from which the county takes its name. Autaugas were members of the Alibamo tribe. They sent many warriors to resist Andrew Jackson's invasion in . . . — Map (db m27907) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Fort Mims And The Creek Indian War, 1813-14
Front: In 1813, people on the United State’s southwestern frontier were fearful. The Redstick faction of the Creek Indian Nation opposed growing American influence in the area and had voted for war. However, Creeks living in the Tensaw . . . — Map (db m66394) HM
Alabama (Baldwin County), Tensaw — Fort Mims— 500 yards →
Here in Creek Indian War 1813-14 took place most brutal massacre in American history. Indians took fort with heavy loss, then killed all but about 36 of some 550 in the fort. Creeks had been armed by British at Pensacola in this phase . . . — Map (db m86293) HM
Alabama (Barbour County), Batesville — Fort Browder/15th Alabama Infantry
side 1 Fort Browder Approximately one mile south-southwest of here stood Fort Browder, a small wooden fortification built in 1836 for protection in the last war with the Creek Indians and named for Isham Browder, a prominent . . . — Map (db m60895) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Blountsville — Blountsville
1820-1889 seat of Blount County a county older than the State. Named for Tennessee Governor W. G. Blount who sent Andrew Jackson to aid Alabama settlers in Creek Indian War, 1812-1814. Indian Chief Bear Meat lived here at crossing of . . . — Map (db m28038) HM
Alabama (Blount County), Oneonta — Blount CountyA County Older Than the State
Created Feb. 7, 1818 by Alabama Territorial Legislature from lands ceded by the Creek Indian Nation. Named for the Tennessee Governor W. G. Blount, who sent militia under Andrew Jackson to punish the Creeks for Fort Mims massacre. Jackson fought and . . . — Map (db m24353) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Forest Home — The Butler Massacre / Fort Bibb
(obverse) The Butler Massacre On March 20, 1818, Capt. William Butler, Capt. James Saffold, William Gardener, Daniel Shaw and John Hinson left Fort Bibb to meet Col. Sam Dale. They were attacked near Pine Barren Creek by Savannah . . . — Map (db m83259) HM
Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Pioneer Cemetery
Greenville's oldest, established 1819. Captain William Butler, for whom the county was named, buried here. He was killed fighting Indians led by Savannah Jack in March, 1818. Greenville's oldest church, a community church established in 1822, . . . — Map (db m70751) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Alexandria — Lincoyerand The Battle of Tallasehatchee
At this site, on Nov. 3, 1813, after the Battle of Tallasehatchee, known then as Talluschatches, during the Creek Indian War, Gen. Andrew Jackson found a dead Creek Indian woman embracing her living infant son. Gen. Jackson, upon hearing that . . . — Map (db m36551) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Alexandria — TallasseehatcheeCreek Indian War 1813-14 — Nov. 3, 1813
Gen. John Coffee, commanding 900 Tennessee Volunteers, surrounded Indians nearby; killed some 200 warriors. This was first American victory. It avenged earlier massacre of 517 at Ft. Mims by Indians. — Map (db m27610) HM
Alabama (Calhoun County), Alexandria — The Tallasahatchie Battle Field
This Stone Marks The Site Of The Tallasahatchie Battle Field. On this spot Lieut. Gen. John Coffee with Gen. Andrew Jackson’s men won a victory over the Creek Indians, Nov. 3, 1813. Erected by the Frederick Wm. Gray Chapt. Daughters of . . . — Map (db m36554) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Grove Hill — Elijah & Issac Pugh
Side 1 Near this spot are the graves of American Revolution soldier Elijah Pugh and his son Issac, a War of 1812 veteran. Elijah, born in Guilford Co., N.C. in 1760, was 18 when he joined a patriot band led by Col. Elijah Clarke at the . . . — Map (db m83270) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Fort Sinquefield
Fort Sinquefield Kimbell - James Massacre Creek War 1812-13 Erected by Clarke County School Children 1931 Lest we forget Hayden and his dogs. — Map (db m47701) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Kimbell - James Massacre←½ mile—
Sept. 1, 1813 Creek Indian War. 1813-14 Part of War of 1812. British used Pensacola as base to arm, incite Indians against U.S.. Prophet Francis led Indians in this raid on Kimbell home. They Killed and scalped 12 of 14 (two survivors . . . — Map (db m47635) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Old Indian Trail
Here passed the Old Indian Trail used as a dividing line between the Choctaw and Creek Tribes. General Andrew Jackson and his troops rested here for the night in 1813. — Map (db m47633) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Ashland — Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 / Clay County and the Creek Indian Confederacy
Side 1 Clay County and the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 During the Creek Indian War of 1813-14, a subset of the War of 1812 with England, numerous figures prominent in American history marched over what would become Clay . . . — Map (db m95100) HM
Alabama (Clay County), Goodwater — Battle of EnitachopkoCreek Indian War 1813-14. — ← 4 mi. E.
Hostile Creeks attacked Andrew Jackson, withdrawing to Ft. Strother, Jan. 24, 1814. His troops broke through lines, kept on to Ft. Strother. But Creeks boasted that they defeated 'Capt. Jack', drove him to the Coosa. — Map (db m95076) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Bermuda — Old Federal Road
Near Bermuda was the home of Jeremiah Austill, who won fame in the canoe fight on the Alabama River during the Creek Indian War. His first wife, Sarah, died of injuries from falling off a fence during an Indian raid. — Map (db m81280) HM
Alabama (Conecuh County), Pine Orchard — Old Federal RoadFort Warren
Site of Fort Warren, built in 1816 by Colonel Richard Warren, who owned considerable land in this vicinity. This facility was used as a refuge for settlers who feared for their lives in the early days of the aftermath of the Creek Indian Wars of . . . — Map (db m47689) HM
Alabama (Dale County), Ariton — Veterans Memorial Bridge - 1921 / Grist Mill - Indian Battle - Recreation
(Front):Veterans Memorial Bridge - 1921This reinforced concrete river bridge, thought to be the first in Alabama. Was erected over Pea River in 1920-21 at a cost of $92,108.97. It was dedicated on August 3, 1921 as a memorial to the 57 men . . . — Map (db m36511) HM
Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Fort Jackson
At this site stood Fort Toulouse, later Fort Jackson, named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson who on March 27, 1814, defeated the Creek Indians in a decisive battle at Horseshoe Bend. Erected by Peter Forney Chapter D.A.R. . . . — Map (db m69705) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — Camp Wills
Established as a supply camp by General Andrew Jackson, September 1813, on the banks of Big Wills Creek. It was here that Jackson directed the first campaign of the Creek War, and promoted Colonel John Coffee to Brigadier General and Captain Newton . . . — Map (db m73993) HM
Alabama (Henry County), Shorterville — "Irwin Empire"
Site of the 1831 Irwin homeplace where over 50,000 acres of land was owned by Major General William Irwin (1794-1850). He was an Indian fighter, farmer, politician, statesman and considered one of the nation’s richest and most influential men. A . . . — Map (db m71824) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Pioneer Massey Cemetery
Samuel Massey and his brother - in - law, Duke William Glenn, first came to this Territory in February 1814 with Lt. Col Reuben Nash's Regt. South Carolina Volunteer Militia to help defeat the Creek Indians in the War of 1812. Samuel Massey returned . . . — Map (db m25088) HM
Alabama (Jefferson County), Clay — Wear Cemetery
Established about 1850, Wear Cemetery is located off Old Springville Road to the northeast at Countryside Circle. In the 1800's the Wear family was among the first settlers of the community later known as Clay. Twenty-three remaining graves were . . . — Map (db m25113) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Oakville — Historic Indians
Five Historic Indian tribes lived in this area. By 1701, The Yuchi were living at the shoals on the Tennessee River. In early 1700s the Yuchi left, some moving to the Cherokee Nation on the Hiwassee River, TN and others to Chattahoochee River, GA. . . . — Map (db m36040) HM
Alabama (Lowndes County), White Hall — Holy Ground Battlefield
Six miles North, on December 23, 1813, General F.L. Claiborne's army defeated the Creeks and destroyed the Holy Ground Indian Village. One American was killed and 33 Creeks. William "Red Eagle" Weatherford escaped by leaping on horseback into . . . — Map (db m60714) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Late Indian Wars1866–1890
I am Trooper Able Freeman of the 9th Cavalry Regiment. I had been a field slave in south Alabama before and during the Civil War; but after the war, I had nowhere to go when the Union occupied the area. I wandered around living hand-to-mouth for . . . — Map (db m85542) WM
Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Seminole Wars / Mexican War
Seminole Wars 1814-1858 I am Private Pet Younger of the 4th US Infantry Regiment. I joined the Regular Army in November 1835 at age 15. I was specially trained as part of the light infantry company whose main jobs were scouting and . . . — Map (db m85604) WM
Alabama (Marshall County), Guntersville — History of Guntersville
(Side A) This area's proximity to the Tennessee River and Indian trails made it a crossroads for early habitation, settlement, and trade. Archaeological studies reveal it was first inhabited about 12,000 years ago by Paleo-Indians. They . . . — Map (db m33305) HM
Alabama (Monroe County), Burnt Corn — Old Federal RoadBurnt Corn
Burnt Corn, Monroe County's earliest settlement, became the crossroads of the Great Pensacola Trading Path and The Federal Road. Settler Jim Cornells returned from Pensacola in 1813, finding his home destroyed and his wife kidnapped by a Creek . . . — Map (db m47687) HM
Alabama (Monroe County), Perdue Hill — Fort ClaiborneCreek Indian War 1813-1814
Built by Gen. Ferdinand L. Claiborne as a base for his invasion of the Alabama country with U.S. Regulars, Lower Tombigbee Militia, and friendly Choctaws. Claiborne’s campaign culminated in the American victory over the Creeks at the Holy Ground. — Map (db m47641) HM
Alabama (Monroe County), Uriah — Creek Indian Removal
Little River was the home of Creek Chief William Weatherford, also known as War Chief Red Eagle. This was the area of much discussion and debate, bringing the Creeks into the War of 1812 and the Creek Civil War of 1813-1814. These events weighed . . . — Map (db m86271) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Fort Mitchell — Fort Mitchell<----- 5 miles -----
Built during Creek War 1813 by Georgia Militia on main Indian trade route to Tombigbee River. U.S. Troops stationed here until 1837. 1836 Lower Creeks corralled here for forced removal to the West. — Map (db m26069) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Seale — John Bacon McDonald
(obverse) Near here is the site of the plantation of John Bacon McDonald who was born February 8, 1859. He entered the United States Military Academy on June 14, 1876, after finishing the tutelage of Colonel John M. Brannon of Seale and . . . — Map (db m69408) HM
Alabama (Saint Clair County), Ashville — A County Older Than The State, St. Clair CountyCreated in 1818 in first session of Alabama Territorial Legislature
from lands ceded by Creek Indian Nation in Treaty of Ft. Jackson, 1814. Named for Gen. Arthur St. Clair, hero of Revolution, governor of Northwest Territory. First settlers from Tennessee, Georgia - veterans of Creek Indian War, 1813-14. . . . — Map (db m28143) HM
Alabama (Saint Clair County), Ashville — John Looney HouseCirca 1820
John Looney and son, Henry, served in General Andrew Jackson's volunteer company which built Fort Strother on Coosa River and later fought at Horseshoe Bend in 1814. Looney's family of nine moved from Maury Co. Tenn. to homestead 1817 in St. Clair . . . — Map (db m24066) HM
Alabama (Saint Clair County), Ohatchee — Fort Strother
Creek Indian War Headquarters of Gen. Andrew Jackson 1813 - 1814 Erected By St. Clair County — Map (db m28144) HM
Alabama (Shelby County), Chelsea — City Of ChelseaIncorporated March 1, 1996 — Mayor S. Earl Niven
Side A Creek Indians once owned and hunted the land where the City of Chelsea now stands. In 1813, Andrew Jackson and his army won millions of acres of Creek land from the Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, including the area where . . . — Map (db m38488) HM
Alabama (Talladega County), Fayetteville — Fayetteville
Here in 1814 Tennessee Troops Joined Andrew Jackson's force which won the Creek Indian War. After Indian removal in 1836 these veterans brought their families here, named this community for their old home in Tennessee. Fayetteville Academy . . . — Map (db m57993) HM
Alabama (Talladega County), Sylacauga — Fort Williams—12 miles west—
Built by Andrew Jackson with U.S. Regulars, Tennessee Volunteers and friendly Cherokees and Creeks. Used as advance base during final phases of Creek Indian War, 1813-1814. Military cemetery nearby. — Map (db m57761) HM
Alabama (Talladega County), Talladega — Battle Of TalladegaNov. 9, 1813
Here Andrew Jackson led Tennessee Volunteers and friendly Indians to victory over hostile “Red Sticks.” This action rescued friendly Creeks besieged in Fort Leslie. Creek Indian War 1813 - 1814. — Map (db m28205) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Dadeville — Battle Of Horseshoe BendOne hundredth anniversary — 1814 - 1914
This tablet is placed by Tallapoosa County in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the Battle Of Horseshoe Bend, fought within its limits on March 27, 1814. There the Creek Indians, led by Menawa and other chiefs, . . . — Map (db m28751) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — A Bloody ContestHorseshoe Bend National Military Park
Any officer or soldiers who flies before the enemy-shall suffer death. With these harsh words, Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson marched his soldiers 52 miles from the Coosa River to Horseshoe Bend and a bloody contest with the Red Sticks. His . . . — Map (db m46674) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — Charge!Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Having maintained for a few minutes a very obstinate contest, muzzle to muzzle, through the port-holes, in which many of the enemy's balls were welded to the bayonets of our musquets, our troops succeeded in gaining possession of the opposite . . . — Map (db m46676) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — Designed for DefenseHorseshoe Bend National Military Park
...[The Creek] had erected a breast-work, of greatest compactness and strength-from five to eight feet high, and prepared with double rows of port-holes very artfully army could not approach it without being exposed to a double and . . . — Map (db m46677) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — Horseshoe Bend Campaign Combatants
In memory of the Soldiers and Indian allies who died in combat with the Upper Creek Indians during the Horseshoe Bend Campaign in the Creek War of 1813-1814 In memory of the Upper Creek Warriors who died in combat with United . . . — Map (db m64594) WM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — Horseshoe Bend National Military ParkWho Were the Creek?
Horseshoe Bend National Military Park The park offers activities designed to commemorate the events that occurred here on March 27, 1814. The Battle of Horseshoe Bend ended the Creek Indian War and added nearly 23 million acres of land to the . . . — Map (db m46232) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — The High GroundHorseshoe Bend National Military Park
[The] high ground which extended about mid-way from the breastwork to the river was in some manner open, but the declivity and flat which surrounded it was filled with fallen timber, the growth of which was very heavy, and had been so arrayed . . . — Map (db m47498) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — Tohopeka in FlamesHorseshoe Bend National Military Park
In this meadow 350 women and children, sheltered in the village of Tohopeka, listened to the sounds of battle drifting back from the barricade 1,000 yards away. Alarmed, they watched as enemy Cherokee and Lower Creek warriors crossed the river, . . . — Map (db m47469) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — While the Long Roll Was BeatingHorseshoe Bend National Military Park
I never had such emotions as while the long roll was beating...It was not fear, it was not anxiety or concern of the fate of those who were so soon to fall but it was a kind of enthusiasm that thrilled through every nerve and animated me with . . . — Map (db m46675) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Daviston — With Deer Tails in Their HairHorseshoe Bend National Military Park
On the morning of the battle, Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson’s Indian allies surrounded the lower portion of Horseshoe Bend. The Cherokee were positioned across the river from where you stand; the Lower Creek were farther upriver to your left. . . . — Map (db m47446) HM
Alabama (Tallapoosa County), New Site — Battle Of Emucfau– 5 miles south → — January 22, 1814
Jackson fortified position here during Creek Indian War (1813-1814). Although repeated attacks by the Red Sticks were repulsed, Jackson withdrew with the Indians pursuing. — Map (db m45736) HM
Arizona (Apache County), Alpine — The Old Bushvalley Fort
Here Stood The Old Bushvalley Fort Built 1879 For protection against Renegade Apaches — Map (db m36274) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Benson — Council Rocks
Four miles southeast at Council Rocks Apache peace treaty with Cochise was ratified in 1872 Near Dragoon Springs on October 12, 1872, General O.O. Howard and Cochise, Chief of the Chiricahua Apache Indians, ratified a peace treaty . . . — Map (db m27877) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Bowie — Centennial of Chiricahua Apache/U.S. Cessation of Hostilities 1886
[Side 1: In English :] September 4-8, 1986, Arizonans marked the return of the Chiricahua Ex-Prisoners of War and their descendants in ceremonies that completed a spiritual circle. We remembered and reflected on the clash between . . . — Map (db m42513) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Bowie — Fort BowieNational Historic Site
A Regional Legacy Cochise. Geronimo. Though their reputations were fierce, the Chiricahua Apaches didn't stop explorers, prospectors, settlers, and merchants from Westward immigration. To establish a lifeline between the East and California, . . . — Map (db m37761) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Bowie — 086-352 — Old Fort BowieGuardian of Apache Pass
Established 1862 following the Battle of Apache Pass, largest conflict in Arizona Indian Wars. Massed Apaches under Cochise and Mangas Coloradas were routed by howitzers fired by California Volunteers attacked in the pass. Fort Bowie overlooked only . . . — Map (db m6994) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Bowie — Post Cemetery
The Post Cemetery predated the establishment of Fort Bowie, when soldiers of the California Column were interred here in 1862. The area was unfenced until 1878, when a four-foot adobe wall was erected to protect the graves from desecration by post . . . — Map (db m68858) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Bowie — The Bascom Affair / Bascom-Cochise Meeting Site
The Bascom Affair On February 4, 1861, 2nd Lt. George Bascom, and his detachment of 54 men encamped two hundred yards east of here. Bascom’s mission was to find Cochise, recover a kidnapped boy and return livestock assumed taken by the . . . — Map (db m42008) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Dragoon — Confederate Graves at Dragoon Springs
On May 5, 1862, a Confederate foraging party rounding up cattle near the abandoned Butterfield Overland Mail Station battled a group of Apaches. The soldiers were members of Company A, Governor John R. Baylor's Regiment of Arizona Rangers, under the . . . — Map (db m83149) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Dragoon — Dragoon Springs Stage StopLand of Legends — Coronado National Forest
The San Antonio and San Diego Mail Line began service across Arizona to the Pacific coast in July, 1857. Its route included a stop here near the Dragoon spring. The San Antonio Line was commonly known as the "Jackass Mail" because mules were used . . . — Map (db m76940) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Elfrida — Camp Rucker and the Indian Scouts
Camp Supply served as the base for two companies of Indian Scouts: Company C commanded by 2nd Lieutenant John A. Rucker, and Company D led by 1st Lieutenant Austin Henely. Each Company included between 32 and 40 Scouts who enlisted for 6 months at a . . . — Map (db m42080) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Elfrida — Chief Cochise
. . . — Map (db m37766) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), San Simon — Geronimo Surrender Monument
"Near here Geronimo, last Apache Chieftain, and Nachite with their followers surrendered on Sept. 6th 1886 to General Nelson A. Miles. U. S. Army. Lieutenant Chas. B. Gatewood with Kieta and Martine Apache scouts, risked their lives to enter the . . . — Map (db m28355) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Sierra Vista — "Unknown Soldiers"
In Memory of those who stood and fought, But names have been forgotten. May they rest in peace. — Map (db m28252) HM
Arizona (Cochise County), Willcox — 1 — The Schwertner House, 1880
Built by Delso Smith as an Army Officer reception center during the Indian wars. Bought by Mr. Schwertner in 1893 and donated to the local Historic Society in 1980. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m28418) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Happy Jack — Battle of Big Dry Wash
Seven miles north of this point a band of Apache Indians were defeated by United States troops on July 17, 1882. A group of tribesmen from the San Carlos Apache reservation had attacked some ranches in the vicinity, killing several settlers. Cavalry . . . — Map (db m67424) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Happy Jack — General Crook Trail
Under the direction of General George Crook this trail was built in the early 1870's. Starting at Fort Whipple, it winds down to Fort Verde then eastward across the Mogollon Rim to Fort Apache covering 200 miles. It was used as a supply route by . . . — Map (db m67419) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Happy Jack — General Crook Trail
Under the direction of General George Crook this trail was built in the early 1870's. Starting at Fort Whipple, it winds down to Fort Verde then eastward across the Mogollon Rim to Fort Apache covering 200 miles. It was used as a supply route by . . . — Map (db m67420) HM
Arizona (Graham County), Fort Thomas — Geronimo
Named for the rebellious medicine man who led the Chiricahua Apaches on their last raids, to surrender, and then into exile in Florida and Oklahoma. Their descendants lived in Eastern Arizona again. This was also the site of original Camp Thomas, . . . — Map (db m28050) HM
Arizona (La Paz County), Ehrenberg — In Memory of Hualapai AncestorsYu’ Nyihay Jamj Vo:jo — La Paz Trail of Tears - April 21, 1874 – April 21, 1875
We honor our ancestors who died violent deaths at the hands of their captors and at this concentration camp. We greet the spirits of our ancestors and embrace their strength and above all else, their will to survive this holocaust: the Hualapai . . . — Map (db m36012) HM
Arizona (Maricopa County), Apache Junction — Alchesay
Alchesay led his people in war and peace Alchesay Canyon, to your right, was named for a great leader. Chief Alchesay, born around 1853, was a leader among the White Mountain Apache. Other Apaches looked up to him not only because he . . . — Map (db m34073) HM
Arizona (Maricopa County), Fort McDowell — Camp Reno
From 1866 to 1868 this outpost of Ft. McDowell served as a departure point for military expeditions against the Tonto and Pinal Apache Indians. — Map (db m27679) HM
Arizona (Maricopa County), Fort McDowell — Fort McDowell
This important military post protected central Arizona settlements from the Tonto Apaches during the Indian wars 1865-1886. Its function as a military post ended in 1890 and it became a reservation by executive order, September 15, 1909 as home of . . . — Map (db m27681) HM
Arizona (Mohave County), Bullhead City — Arizona Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States Armed Forces to those who distinguish themselves "…conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of their lives above and beyond the call of duty while . . . — Map (db m29435) HM
Arizona (Mohave County), Kingman — Camp Beale Springs Arizona
This camp, established March 25, 1871 by Company F, 12th Infantry commanded by Capt. Thomas Bryne, was located at a spring used by Indians for centuries. It was named for Navy Lt. Edward F Beale who established a wagon road along the 35th parallel. . . . — Map (db m29411) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — Adjutant's Office (117)
Built of adobe bricks in 1876, this is the third oldest surviving building at Fort Apache. Originally the Adjutant's Office (administrative office) of the post, it also served variously as post headquarters, military Post Office, telegraph office, . . . — Map (db m36799) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — Captain's Quarters (102 and 103)
An 1891 fire, sparked by a defective chimney and fanned by high winds, destroyed five sets of wood frame officers' quarters that had been constructed in this area between 1883 and 1886. Using sandstone quarried just east of the Fort, these two . . . — Map (db m36779) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — First Commanding Officer's Quarters (101)
This log cabin is the oldest surviving building at Fort Apache. The westernmost of a series of eight log cabins built in 1871 to form Officers' Row, this cabin was designated the Commanding Officer's Quarters. It was originally an 18 by 20 foot log . . . — Map (db m36778) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — Officer's Quarters (106)
This frame officer's quarters in the only one of seven built between 1883 and 1886 to have survived without significant modifications. Like many of the post's residences, it was built around a large central hallway that runs the length of the house. . . . — Map (db m36794) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — Officers' Quarters (107, 108, 109)
These three officers' quarters were constructed between 1883 and 1888 to house junior officers and their families. With clipped-corner porches and symmetrical front elevations, these quarters reflect the architectural style established by the . . . — Map (db m36796) HM
Arizona (Navajo County), Fort Apache — Parade Ground
This large open field between Officers' Row and the enlisted men's Barracks Row was used by the army for drill practice, training, and review. When called to action, troops would assemble here prior to departure. It also provided a prime location . . . — Map (db m36781) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Camp Lowell 1866-1873
Camp Lowell was established at this location in 1866 by the U.S. Army in recognition of the strategic military importance of Tucson. The local populace was fearful of Apaches, and the camp provided military protection as well as bringing financial . . . — Map (db m83013) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Fort Lowell
The military post, established in 1862 near downtown Tucson, was moved to this location in 1873. One of many active forts on the Arizona frontier, Lowell served also as a major supply depot, influencing the economy and social life of the . . . — Map (db m83031) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Fort Lowell
Largest of the early Arizona military installations this was the supply base for military posts in southern Arizona during the long warfare against the Apaches. Built in 1873, it was Gen. Nelson A. Miles' headquarters in the final campaign against . . . — Map (db m83032) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Veterans MemorialFort Lowell Park
Dedicated to the enduring memory of the men and women who faithfully served in the military forces of the United States of America and in grateful acknowledgment of their contribution to this nation, which in time of peril, found in them its . . . — Map (db m28932) HM
Arizona (Pinal County), Oracle — La Casa Del High JinksNational Register of Historic Places — Historic Site
On this site on April 14, 1912, Colonel William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody – Pony Express rider, plainsman, Indian Wars scout, and Wild West showman – staked the High Jinks gold mine, after investing in Oracle mining for ten years. He . . . — Map (db m70305) HM
Arizona (Pinal County), Sacaton — Honoring Native American Women Veterans
Honoring Native American Women Veterans Dedicated February 22, 2003 American Legion Post 84 Sacaton, AZ Sculptor: Oscar Urrea Artist: Jim Covarrubias — Map (db m32844) WM
Arizona (Pinal County), Superior — Picket Post Mountain
A landmark and lookout point during Indian Wars; site of outpost of Camp Pinal which was located at head of Stoneman Grade to the east. Soldiers protected Pinal City and the Silver King Mine from Apache raiders. It was the home of Col. William Boyce . . . — Map (db m34122) HM
Arizona (Santa Cruz County), Patagonia — John Ward's Ranch
Arizona Pioneer Johnny Ward established a ranch here in 1858. In 1861 Indians kidnapped his Mexican stepson Felix Ward. Army officers assumed that local eastern Chiracahua Apaches were responsible, leading to the infamous conflict between Lt. Bascom . . . — Map (db m24436) HM
Arizona (Santa Cruz County), Sonoita — Camp Crittenden
Established August 10, 1867. Named Camp Crittenden by Generals Orders No. 57 Department of California, September 30, 1867, in honor of Thomas S. Crittenden, Col. 32nd U.S. Infantry Major General U.S. Volunteers. Camp abandoned June 1, 1873. . . . — Map (db m27114) HM
Arizona (Yavapai County), Camp Verde — "0" Mile Post General Crook Trail
The Crook Road begins at this point with the first in a series of mile markers across the Mogollon Rim segment of the military supply trail connecting Forts Whipple, Verde and Apache. Reconnoitered in 1871 by General George Crook with a . . . — Map (db m28561) HM
Arizona (Yavapai County), Camp Verde — Camp Verde
The oldest settlement in the Verde Valley. Site of historic Fort Verde. The first settlers came into the valley in February, 1865, followed by the military in August, 1865. Original military and historic buildings still stand. — Map (db m40814) HM
Arizona (Yavapai County), Camp Verde — Fort Verde State Historic ParkThe West As It Really Was!
The Mythology of a Western Fort Fort Verde is typical of western forts built in the 1870's and 1880's but our vision of forts comes from movies. Log stockades with towers and John Wayne fearlessly firing his rifle at attacking Indians. The . . . — Map (db m40815) HM
Arizona (Yavapai County), Camp Verde — The Congressional Medal of Honor - Apache Campaign 1872 - 1873
The following named individuals were assigned, either permanently or temporarily, to Camp Verde, Arizona Territory. While stationed here their personal action in combat was above and beyond the call of duty, earning them the nation's highest . . . — Map (db m28593) HM
Arizona (Yavapai County), Prescott — John Towhey
Stone Marker: 14 Inf. N.Y. John Towhey Wounded Here 1861 Plaque Attached to Stone: -- January 1970 -- This stone with inscription of incident was originally located on the Yavapai Indian Reservation . . . — Map (db m21966) HM
Arkansas (Benton County), Bella Vista — United States Commanders in Chief

[Written on the initial marker, provided for context] Our Constitution names the President of the United States the Commander in Chief of all the Armed Forces. Presidents who have served in our military are displayed on the following . . . — Map (db m92384) HM WM

Arkansas (Benton County), Bella Vista — United States Commanders in Chief

[Written on the initial marker, provided for context] Our Constitution names the President of the United States the Commander in Chief of all the Armed Forces. Presidents who have served in our military are displayed on the following . . . — Map (db m92389) HM WM

Arkansas (Sebastian County), Fort Smith — Clues from the PastFort Smith National Historic Site
The building in front of you is very much as it appeared in the 1890s. First used as a military barracks, it was later converted for use as a courthouse and jail. Over time its appearance changed to accommodate the different needs of the people . . . — Map (db m82354) HM WM
California (Alameda County), Oakland — In Memory of Col. John Coffee Hays1-28-1817 • 4-21-1883
Born near Little Cedar Lick, Wilson County, Tennessee. Lived in Mississippi, where he learned surveying. Joined Republic of Texas Army in May, 1836, and served 3 years in ranger/spy companies. Gained fame as an Indian fighter while surveyor for . . . — Map (db m55204) HM
California (Fresno County), Firebaugh — 10 — Andrew Davidson Firebaugh - Firebaugh's Ferry
Andrew Davidson Firebaugh was born in Virginia in 1823. He served with the Texas Mounted Riflemen in the Mexican War. Coming to Californian in 1849, he fought in the Mariposa Indian War under Major James D. Savage on the expedition that discovered . . . — Map (db m28015) HM
California (Fresno County), Fresno — 3 — Fort Washington
Approximately 2 miles north of this point, Fort Washintgon was built in the spring of 1850 by Wiley B Cassity (Cassady or Cassidy), Charls D. Gibbes, Major Lane and others. This fort, probably the first building erected in Fresno County, served as . . . — Map (db m28013) HM
California (Lassen County), Janesville — Fort Janesville
built in 1859 during the Piute War — Map (db m87774) HM
California (Lassen County), Susanville — Peter Lassen Grave
In memory of Peter Lassen the pioneer who was killed by the Indians April 26, 1859 Aged 66 years — Map (db m10261) HM
California (Mariposa County), El Portal — Site of Savage’s Trading Post
Here in 1849, James D. Savage, established a store built of logs. He engaged in trading and mining and married several squaws for protection and influence. In spring of 1850, fearing Indian depredations, he moved to Mariposa Creek. In December, his . . . — Map (db m904) HM
California (Mariposa County), Wawona — 4 — Yosemite Valley's First Visit by White Men
From the crest of the ridge of a few hundred feet behind this point members of the Mariposa Battalion under the leadership of Major James D. Savage looked into Yosemite Valley on March 27, 1851. Alarmed by the encroaching tide of California Gold . . . — Map (db m47417) HM
California (Modoc County), Canby — Evans and Bailey Fight 1861
Monument site on top of hill — Map (db m87842) HM
California (Modoc County), Newell — Warm Springs Indians
Two Warm Springs Indians, acting as scouts with the U.S. Army were killed at the Battle of Dry Lake. That final battle of the Modoc War was fought about 10 miles S.E. of here May 10, 1873. They were brought to the Peninsula Camp, just south of here, . . . — Map (db m87893) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — Colonel William Stephen HamiltonIn Memory of the Rough Diamond
. . . — Map (db m12405) HM
California (Sacramento County), Sacramento — General George Wright1803 – 1865
A graduate of West Point, his gallantry on the fields of battle earned him commendations; from the Seminole War in Florida, to the Mexican War, to the Indian Campaign in the Pacific Northwest. His unwavering loyalty to the Union would prompt . . . — Map (db m10766) HM
California (Shasta County), Castella — CHL 116 — Battle Rock
Battle of the Crags was fought below Battle Rock in June 1855. This conflict between the Modoc Indians and the settlers resulted from miners destroying the native fishing waters in the Lower Soda Springs area. Settlers led by Squire Reuben Gibson . . . — Map (db m69857) HM
California (Shasta County), Fall River Mills — Captain Dick and Richard Pugh
In Commemoration of Captain Dick and Richard Pugh The 1850's saw tension and turmoil between the early settlers and the native peoples of the Fall River Valley. Richard Pugh, a native of Wales, was chosen by Lt. George Crook to be his . . . — Map (db m10287) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Hornbrook — Bradford Ripley Alden1811-1870
On Aug. 8, 1853 Captain Alden led 10 men of the 4th U.S. Infantry from Fort Jones and 80 volunteers from Yreka over these mountains to the assistance of the Rogue River Valley. This force augmented by 100 volunteers from Oregon defeated the . . . — Map (db m70216) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Newell — 110 — Canby’s Cross
General E.R.S. Canby was murdered here in April, 1873, while holding a peace parley under flag of truce with Captain Jack and Indian Chiefs. Rev. Eleazer Thomas, Peace Commissioner, was likewise treacherously slain. — Map (db m10466) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Newell — 9 — Captain Jack’s Stronghold* <— 11 Miles *
From this fortress Captain Jack and his Indian forces successfully resisted capture by U.S. Army troops from December 1, 1872 to April 18, 1873. Other nearby landmarks of the Modoc Indian War are Canby's Cross, No.110 and Guillam's Graveyard, No.13 — Map (db m76320) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tule Lake — Ambush at Midday - The Thomas-Wright Battle of April 26, 1873Last Victor for the Modocs
Forced to flee the stronghold, the Modoc took cover amid the craggy lava features in this area. A group under Scarface Charley watched from the Schonchin Flow as Army troops marched from Gillems Camp toward their concealed position. Officers . . . — Map (db m87906) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tule Lake — Attack at Hospital Rock
It was April 11, 1873, the middle of the Modoc War. Though greatly outnumbered, Modoc warriors had easily defeated the Army in the first battle for the Stronghold in January, and soldiers had waited through the winter while peach talks dragged on. . . . — Map (db m87916) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tule Lake — Canby Cross
Over the years, various individuals and group have made efforts to memorialize the death of General E.R.S. Canby, the only general to be killed in an Indian War. This wooden cross is a replica of an original erected by a U.S. soldier in 1882, just . . . — Map (db m87909) HM WM
California (Siskiyou County), Tule Lake — Shore of Tule Lake
This was the shoreline of Tule Lake in 1872-73. The Modoc Indians occupying the Stronghold obtained water at this point. Once nearly 100,000 acres, the lake was drained between 1912 and 1958 to make fertile land available for homesteads. — Map (db m87914) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tule Lake — The Road to the Stronghold
Thousands of years ago, flowing lava cooled forming a natural fortress. The surrounding area later became the center of the Modoc Indian homeland. A series of events made this lava stronghold a focal point in the war to remove the Modoc from their . . . — Map (db m87917) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tulelake — Attracted to Water
“When I was a child…I played around Tule Lake where the tules and grass grow thick… We used to go out in the tall grass… and look for chub fish… and shoot at (them) with our arrows.” Peter Schonchin, last surviving . . . — Map (db m63249) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tulelake — Last Meeting of the Peace Commission — Lava Beds National Monument
By April 1873, months of peace talks to end the Modoc War had gone nowhere. General E.R.S. Canby found himself caught between President Grant’s Indian Peace Policy and the desire of some settlers to have the Army eliminate the Modoc band. The Modoc . . . — Map (db m63211) WM
California (Siskiyou County), Tulelake — Lava FortressCaptain Jack's Stronghold
“Peaceable if you can, forcibly if you must,” ordered Indian Agent T. B. Odeneal. The U.S. Army garrison’s task was to bring the Modocs and their leader, Captain Jack, back to the reservation. His refusal started the Modoc War in the . . . — Map (db m63213) WM
California (Siskiyou County), Tulelake — Modoc War CasualtiesGillems Graveyard
It is difficult today to trace the disposition of all those killed in action during the Modoc War. This site was first consecrated January 17, 1873, when two soldiers were buried here. It became an official cemetery in April when thirteen enlisted . . . — Map (db m63670) HM
California (Siskiyou County), Tulelake — The End of the Modoc War — Lava Beds National Monument
Through the winter of 1872-1873, a vastly outnumbered group of Modoc Indians resisted attempts by the U.S. Army to remove them from their homeland. Driven from Captain Jack's stronghold, the Modoc moved into this area in mid-April. Intimate . . . — Map (db m63270) WM
California (Siskiyou County), Tulelake — War in the Lava BedsNovember 1872 - June 1873
From this command post, the U.S. Army directed part of a frustrating campaign against a small band of Modoc Indians. Determined to defend their homeland, the Modoc consistently outmaneuvered the Army, who at times outnumbered them ten to one. Just . . . — Map (db m63668) HM
California (Tulare County), Springville — Battle Mountain
A long period of unrest between the settlers and Indians of Tulare County erupted in war during the Spring of 1856. Untrue reports that five hundred head of cattle had been stolen in Frazier Valley and the burning of the Orson K. Smith sawmill . . . — Map (db m34474) HM
California (Tuolumne County), Dardanelle — The Last Battle
The canyon to your right was the scene of the last battle between Indians and whites in Tuolumne County. On February 10, 1858, a band of Piutes attacked a group of employees of the Columbia & Stanislaus River Water Co. In the fight which followed . . . — Map (db m78075) HM
Colorado (Costilla County), Fort Garland — 190 — Fort Garland
Top of the Marker: The Soldier’s Life Fort Garland housed infantry and cavalry units. During the 1870’s the famed Buffalo Soldiers—African-American cavalrymen—were also posted here. For all soldiers—and their . . . — Map (db m71032) HM WM
Colorado (Denver County), Denver — Colorado Soldier's Monument
(West side): Colorado Territory - Organized February 28, 1861 Colorado Admitted as a State August 1, 1876 Census of Territory in 1861 - 23,331 War Governors William Gilpin Richard Ed Whitsitt Adjutant General 1861-1862 John . . . — Map (db m4745) HM
Colorado (Denver County), Denver — Silas S. Soule
At this location on April 23, 1865, assassins shot and killed 1st Colorado Cavalary Officer Capt. Silas S. Soule. During the infamous Sand Creek Massacre of November 29, 1864, Soule had disobeyed orders by refusing to fire on Chief Black Kettle's . . . — Map (db m67133) HM
Colorado (Elbert County), Kiowa — 272 — Trail Under Siege / Rising to the Challenge
Trail Under Siege Indians of Colorado’s High Plains Kiowa and Comanche Indians migrated to these prairies in the 1700s, followed by Cheyennes and Arapahos in the early 1800s. The region’s vast grasslands, thick bison herds, and brisk fur . . . — Map (db m45756) HM
Colorado (Jefferson County), Golden — Buffalo Bill
(Upper Plaque) In Memoriam Colonel William Frederick Cody "Buffalo Bill" Noted scout and Indian fighter Born February 26, 1846 Scott County, Iowa Died January 10, 1917 Denver, Colorado (Lower Plaque) William F. Cody . . . — Map (db m29670) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — HealingSand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
Though the Sand Creek Massacre has long passed, memories live on. Cheyenne and Arapaho return here to pray and pay tribute to ancestors who both perished and survived that dreadful day. Ever resilient, the Cheyenne and Arapaho nations of today . . . — Map (db m92950) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — Pleas for PeaceSand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
"All we ask is that we may have peace with the whites...We want to take good tidings home to our people, that they may sleep in peace." Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle As tensions mounted, Chiefs Black Kettle and Left Hand pled . . . — Map (db m92948) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — RemainsSand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
”Many years have passed. The land is still here. We lived here, our clans lived here. The land here is our home - we have come back home.” Arapaho: Wonoo3ei’i ceciniihi’ coowoo’ou’u. Nih’iine’etiino’ hiitiino. . . . — Map (db m71872) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — TestimonySand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
In the aftermath of Sand Creek, federal investigations and military inquiry took place. Dozens of eyewitness' provided testimony. Taken in Washington, D.C., Denver City, Fort Lyon, and other locations, officers, soldiers, and civilians came forth. . . . — Map (db m92949) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — The Attack
A barrage of arms fire was leveled against the Cheyenne and Arapaho. Amid the wild confusion, soldiers noticed people at the village “... going slowly away in a sort of listless, and dazed, or confused manner ...” Throughout the morning . . . — Map (db m71873) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — The Sand Creek MassacreSand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
On November 29, 1864, U.S. Colonel John Chivington and 700 volunteer troops attacked an encampment of Cheyenne and Arapaho along Sand Creek. The thunderous approach of horses galloping toward camp at dawn sent hundreds fleeing from their tipis. Many . . . — Map (db m72552) HM
Colorado (Kiowa County), Eads — Why?Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
For years, Cheyenne and Arapaho traveled and hunted the Great Plains in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains. But in 1858, gold fever struck in Colorado Territory. Miners rushed in and tens of thousands of settlers followed. Competition for land became . . . — Map (db m92947) HM
Colorado (Logan County), Merino — 2 — Fort Wicked
Due west 940 feet stood “Fort Wicked" Originally Godfrey’s Ranch Famous Overland Stage Station One of the few posts withstanding the Indian uprising of 1864 on the road to Colorado. Named from the . . . — Map (db m61998) HM
Colorado (Logan County), Sterling — 34 — Battle of Summit Springs
3 miles southeast from this point is the site of theBattle of Summit Springs Last engagement with Plains Indians in Colorado, July 11, 1869. Cheyennes who raided western Kansas were attacked by General E. A. Carr with the Fifth U.S. Cavalry . . . — Map (db m61997) HM
Colorado (Logan County), Sterling — 227 — Indian Wars 1864-1869
In November 1864, in southeastern Colorado, U.S. Volunteers troops attacked Black Kettle’s peaceful band of Cheyenne Indians at Sand Creek. In retaliation for the massacre and mutilation of 163 Cheyenne men, women, and children, Cheyenne warriors . . . — Map (db m51217) HM
Connecticut (New Haven County), Milford — George W. Baird
George W. Baird Medal of Honor Brig General US Army Indian Wars Dec 13 1839     Nov 28 1906 — Map (db m54720) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Philip H. SheridanGeneral of the Army of the United States
SHERIDAN — Map (db m22046) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Walter Reed Memorial
[Front]Walter Reed 1851 - 1902 Bacteriologist - Research Scientist In Honor of his great work in the fight for the eradication of yellow Fever. [Back:] [Insignia of the Army Medical Corps] In recognition of the high public . . . — Map (db m68990) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Winfield ScottGeneral-in-Chief, U.S. Army
SCOTT — Map (db m21943) WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Old Soldiers Home — Winfield Scott
In Honor of Lieutenant General Winfield Scott Born 13 June 1788 – Died 29 May 1866 General in Chief of the Army 1841 – 1861 Founder of the United States Soldiers Home — Map (db m52806) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Gainesville — F-201 — Fort Clarke
Near this site was located Fort Clarke, originally a U.S. Army post during the Seminole War, and afterwards a settlement. The name is preserved in nearby Fort Clarke Church. At this site crossed the early settlement and military road connecting the . . . — Map (db m65191) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Gainesville — F-402 — Jesse Johnson Finley
Jesse Johnson Finley was born in Wilson County, Tennessee, November 18, 1812 and educated in Lebanon, Tennessee. After service as a captain in the Seminole War of 1836, he studied law and was admitted to the bar. During a ten year period he served . . . — Map (db m93855) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Gainesville — F-165 — Spanish Cattle Ranching
Present-day Gainesville was the center of a large Spanish cattle ranching industry, founded on the labor of native Timuqua Indians, during the 1600s. LaChua, largest of the ranches, was a Spanish corruption of an Indian word, and in turn was . . . — Map (db m72916) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Micanopy — F-706 — Micanopy
Founded after Spain relinquished Florida to the United States in 1821. Micanopy became the first distinct American town founded in the new US territory. Originally an Indian trading post, Micanopy was built under the auspices of the Florida . . . — Map (db m54271) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Rochelle — F- 353 — Rochelle Vicinity
(Front text) Colonel Daniel Newnan led a troop of the Georgia militia on a raid into the area in September 1812 in an attempt to annex Florida to the United States in the War of 1812. The raiders engaged a force of Seminole Indians under . . . — Map (db m54642) HM
Florida (Brevard County), Cocoa — F-69 — Hernandez Trail
One half mile to the west ran the Hernandez Trail used during the Seminole War. It connected forts along the east Coast to Ft. Dallas in Miami and across from Ft. Pierce and Ft. Capron to Ft. Brooke near Tampa. Brig. General Joseph M. Hernandez, . . . — Map (db m72606) HM
Florida (Brevard County), Melbourne — The Hernandez-Capron Trail
The Hernandez-Capron Trail parallels I-95 here in Brevard County. Laid out in 1838 by U.S. Army during Second Seminole war, it linked King's Road in St. Augustine and forts along St. John's River with Ft. Capron, 4 mi. north of present Ft. Pierce. . . . — Map (db m75839) HM
Florida (Calhoun County), Blountstown — F-120 — Blunt Reservation and Fields
This is the western boundary of a reservation set aside by the treaty of Fort Moultrie and given to John Blunt (Blount) one of the six principal chiefs of the Florida Indians. The Apalachicola River was the eastern boundary. The treaty was ratified . . . — Map (db m78029) HM
Florida (Calhoun County), Blountstown — F-324 — Cochranetown - Corakko Talofv
(This is Florida's first bi-lingual marker. The second language is Apalachicola Muskogee/Creek.) Apalachicola Creek Indians permanently settled Calhoun County in 1815; wars forced them out of Alabama. A new Tribal Town was built by Chief Tuskie . . . — Map (db m48489) HM
Florida (Citrus County), Inverness — Fort Cooper
Fort Cooper was constructed in April 1836 during the Second Seminole War. General Winfield Scott instructed the First Georgia Battalion of Volunteers under the leadership of Major Mark Anthony Cooper to build two bastions and a blockhouse on the . . . — Map (db m93258) HM
Florida (DeSoto County), Fort Ogden — F-256 — Fort Ogden
As white settlers moved into Florida, demands increased for the removal of the Seminole Indians to a western reservation. The Seminoles failed to cooperate, and in 1835 the conflict known as the Second Seminole War began. By 1841, the Indians . . . — Map (db m72605) HM
Florida (Dixie County), Horseshoe Beach — F-439 — The Jackson TrailFlorida Heritage Site
On December 26, 1817, U.S. Secretary of War John C. Calhoun directed General Andrew Jackson to protect citizens trying to settle in Florida. Jackson arrived in Florida with the largest army ever to invade the state to date -- 2,000 Creek Warriors . . . — Map (db m61566) HM
Florida (Duval County), Jacksonville — Seminole War Blockhouse Site
Here stood the blockhouse erected for the defense of the settlers against the Indians during the Seminole War 1835-1842 — Map (db m70535) HM
Florida (Escambia County), Pensacola — Desiderio Quina
Born in Italy in 1777, Desiderio Quina served the Spanish army in the Louisiana Infantry Regiment. He was later employed in Pensacola as an apothecary for the John Forbes Company where he married Margarita Bobe. His son Desiderio was born in 1817 . . . — Map (db m80044) HM
Florida (Escambia County), Pensacola — Stephen R. Mallory
Born on the island of Trinidad in 1812, Stephen Mallory's family eventually made Key West their home. Mallory studied law, volunteered in the Florida militia during the second Seminole War, and became Inspector of Customs at Key West. In 1830 . . . — Map (db m80042) HM
Florida (Gadsden County), Chattahoochee — F-810 — Apalachicola ArsenalOfficers Quarters and Guard Room
The Apalachicola Arsenal, originally known as the Mt. Vernon Arsenal, was built was built by the United States Army and served as an arms depot during the Second Seminole Indian War. Construction began in 1832, and was completed in 1839. The . . . — Map (db m79625) HM
Florida (Gadsden County), Chattahoochee — F-811 — Apalachicola ArsenalPowder Magazine
The Apalachicola Arsenal, originally known as the Mt. Vernon Arsenal, was built was built by the United States Army and served as an arms depot during the Second Seminole Indian War. Construction began in 1832, and was completed in 1839. The . . . — Map (db m79626) HM
Florida (Gilchrist County), Fanning Springs — The History of Fort Fanning
Fort Fanning was built in 1838 during the Second Seminole War. The fort was originally called "Palmetto", but was renamed in honor of Colonel Alexander Campbell Wilder Fannin (1788-1846). Made of real wood, and situated in warm humid . . . — Map (db m67884) HM
Florida (Hamilton County), White Springs — Wars and Conflicts in White Springs
Although residents living here have always been somewhat insulated, outside influences such as war and conflict have historically influenced the Town of White Springs. The Spanish, French, British, and Americans all fought wars to won the peninsula . . . — Map (db m44512) HM
Florida (Hardee County), Bowling Green — Fort Chokonikla
This leisurely 10 minute, 1/4 mile long trail will lead you to the site of Fort Chokonikla built in late 1849. It consisted of three square blockhouses for defense, and canvas tents for sleeping. No battles were fought here and it was abandoned . . . — Map (db m62019) HM WM
Florida (Hardee County), Zolfo Springs — Seminole Indian Battle
One of the Last Battles fought with the Seminole Nation ended here on June 16, 1856 with Defeat of the Indians by Soldiers from Ft. Meade. — Map (db m61059) HM
Florida (Hernando County), Weeki Wachee — Bayport
The interior of Central Florida opened for settlement by whites in the mid-1840s following the end of the Second Seminole War. In the absence of roads and railroads, coastal and inland waterways provided the transportation routes essential to . . . — Map (db m67109) HM
Florida (Highlands County), Fort Basinger — F-54 — Fort Basinger
Col. Zachary Taylor had Fort Basinger built in 1837, during the Seminole Wars, on the Kissimmee River 17 miles above its mouth. It was a small stockade which served as a temporary fort and supply station on the line of forts extending from Tampa to . . . — Map (db m54083) HM
Florida (Hillsborough County), Tampa — Fort Brooke Cemetery
During the Second Seminole War (1835-42) the U.S. Army established a cemetery at this site for soldiers, civilian employees, and Indians. In 1883, about 20 soldiers were removed to Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola. In time the grave sites . . . — Map (db m44689) HM
Florida (Hillsborough County), Tampa — Historic Fort King Trail
The Old Military Road connecting Ft. Brooke (Tampa) and Ft. King (Ocala) ran through this vicinity. On Dec. 23, 1835, Maj. Francis L. Dade set out over the Trail with a detachment of 109 soldiers to reinforce the small garrison of Ft. King. On . . . — Map (db m8980) HM
Florida (Hillsborough County), Tampa — Old Fort Brooke Municipal Parking Structure1982
On this site was located the first cemetery for Fort Brooke, a U.S. military post dating from 1824 to 1882. Seminole Indians, soldiers and civilian settlers buried here were excavated by archaeologists in 1980 prior to construction of the parking . . . — Map (db m44377) HM
Florida (Lake County), Astor — F-93 — Fort Butler
Located on the west bank of the St. Johns, Ft. Butler was built in 1838 during the Seminole Wars. It consisted of a crude log stockade and barracks for the garrison. The Fort was one of the military installations designed to protect the St. Johns . . . — Map (db m31341) HM
Florida (Lake County), Umatilla — F-598 — Fort Mason
During the Second Seminole War (1835-1842), troops under the command of Brig. Gen. Abraham Eustis left Volusia County headed toward the Withlacoochee River as part of a military action in response to the December 28, 1835 massacre of Major Francis . . . — Map (db m56224) HM
Florida (Leon County), Fort Braden — F-502 — Old Fort Braden School
Fort Braden was established in 1839 as a military outpost during the Second Seminole War (1835-1842). At the end of the war the fort was abandoned, but the small farming community that had developed nearby continued. A school in the Fort Braden area . . . — Map (db m79475) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — Capt. John ParkhillOf Leon Volunteers
This monument is erected by his fellow citizens of Leon County, Florida, as a testimonial of their high esteem for his character and public services. The memory of the hero is the treasure of his country. He was born July 10, 1823 and was killed . . . — Map (db m73046) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-504 — Chaires Historic District
The community of Chaires was established in the 1820s during Floridas Territorial Period (1821-1845). The community is named after Green Hill Chaires, who, along with his two brothers, Benjamin and Thomas Peter, came from Georgia and established . . . — Map (db m79536) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — F-452 — Mission San Luis
Mission San Luis de Talimali was among the largest and most important missions in Spanish Florida. Its parishioners were Apalachee Indians who were descendents of those people whose village Hernando de Soto appropriated during the winter of . . . — Map (db m79564) HM
Florida (Leon County), Tallahassee — Presbyterian Church(One Block West)
The oldest public building in Tallahassee. Construction was begun in 1835 and completed in 1838. Contains original slave galleries. The building was used many times as a place of refuge for women and children during Indian Wars. — Map (db m73053) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Key Biscayne — Let It Shine
The Cape Florida Lighthouse stands today as a reminder of perseverance in the face of hardship. The Cape Florida Lighthouse was built to alert ships as they sailed near the dangerous reefs of the Florida Keys. Constructed in December . . . — Map (db m79720) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Key Biscayne — Lighthouse Keeper's Cottage
The original brick dwelling was completed in July 1825: a two story cottage with two rooms on each floor. The lower floor was dirt and the upper floor had only one small window on each end. The kitchen was attched to the back. The first lighthouse . . . — Map (db m80255) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Miami — Dade CountyCreated Jan. 28, 1836, Named for Major Francis Langhorn Dade — 1784 - 1815
Born 1793 in Virginia. Joined 12th U.S. Infantry in 1813; Served with it thru War of 1812; In 4th Regiment rest of his life. Promoted from 3rd Lieut. to Major, Commanded garrison at Key West. In Seminole War was sent with 117 men to aid Gen. Clinch . . . — Map (db m88531) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Miami — Fort Dallas and the William F. English Plantation Slave QuartersMiami River Greenway
The United States of America took possession of Florida from Spain under the terms of the 1821 Treaty of Paris. In 1830, the U.S. implemented the Indian Removal Act, forcing Seminole Indians south into the Miami and Everglades area. The Second . . . — Map (db m78126) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Miami — F-573 — Virginia Key Beach Park
Virginia Key Beach Park is an environmental and historic landmark located on a barrier island. Its earliest recorded history is of an 1838 skirmish during the Second Seminole War in which three Seminoles were killed on this site. From the early . . . — Map (db m79381) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Miami — Wagner HomesteadMiami River Greenway
This 1850s structure is the oldest standing house in Miami-Dade County. It was built by William Wagner, a German immigrant and U.S. Army veteran. After being wounded in the Mexican-American War in 1847, Wagner returned to Fort Moultrie, Georgia to . . . — Map (db m78192) HM
Florida (Miami-Dade County), Palmetto Bay — F-215 — The Perrine Land Grant
(side 1) In 1838, the United States Congress granted a township of land in the southern extremity of Florida to noted horticulturist Dr. Henry Perrine and his associates. This land was to be used in experiments aimed at introducing foreign . . . — Map (db m73442) HM
Florida (Monroe County), Islamorada — Tea Table Key
Indians lived on this island over 1000 years ago. In 1722, it was known as Boys Island. In Dec., 1838, Lt. Coste established a Naval base here and named it Ft. Paulding. This was the base for the West Indian Squadron used to blockade the coast to . . . — Map (db m83541) HM
Florida (Okeechobee County), Okeechobee — Battle of Okeechobee
In these woods on Christmas Day 1837, was fought the Battle of Okeechobee, in which a large band of Seminole Indians, under Chief Wild Cat, Alligator, and Sam Jones was routed by a brigade led by Colonel Zachary Taylor, consisting of the First, . . . — Map (db m97075) HM WM
Florida (Orange County), Christmas — F-252 — Fort Christmas
As white settlers moved into Florida in the 1820's and 1830's, there were growing demands that the Seminole Indians be removed to a reservation west of the Mississippi. Efforts to convince the Seminoles to move failed, and in 1835 the conflict known . . . — Map (db m54086) HM
Florida (Orange County), Maitland — Fort Maitland / Maitland / Lake Maitland1838 — Directly east of this highway
Fort Maitland was built in November 1838 by Lt. Col. Alexander C. W. Fanning, U.S.A. (1788-1848) on the military road connecting Fort Melon (Sanford) with Fort Gatlin (Orlando) and used as a stockade in the war between the United States and the . . . — Map (db m7452) HM
Florida (Orange County), Maitland — F-523 — Lake Lily DriveA Florida Heritage Site
This road was the first direct route from Northeast Florida to Maitland. It followed Maitland Avenue around this west side of Lake Lily and continued south on what is now Highway 17-92. During the Second Seminole War the United States Army used this . . . — Map (db m13636) HM
Florida (Orange County), Orlando — F-483 — Site of Fort Gatlin
On November 9, 1838, during the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-42), the U.S. Army established Fort Gatlin in Mosquito County. This fort was named for Army Assistant Surgeon John S. Gatlin (1806-1835), who was killed in the Dade Massacre in 1835. . . . — Map (db m6912) HM
Florida (Palm Beach County), Jupiter — Ft. Jupiter - Jupiter Lighthouse
Fort Jupiter was located three miles west on Loxahatchee River, erected January 1838 by troops commanded by Major General Thomas S. Jessup, establishing base for operations in the Seminole Indian Wars. Jupiter Lighthouse, approximately one mile . . . — Map (db m96947) HM
Florida (Palm Beach County), Jupiter — F-631 — Military Trail
After the second Battle of the Loxahatchee (January 24, 1838) during the Second Seminole War (1835-1842), Maj. Gen. Thomas S. Jesup directed Maj. William Lauderdale, Commander of the Tennessee Battalion of Volunteers to cut a trail south from Ft. . . . — Map (db m97073) HM
Florida (Palm Beach County), Jupiter — Tennessee Volunteers and Militia Camp
During the 2nd Seminole Indian War and after the Battle of Loxahatchee Jan 24, 1838, the Tennessee Volunteers and Militia camped on this site. One mile east, the U.S. Army Regulars established Old Fort Jupiter. — Map (db m96969) HM
Florida (Pasco County), Dade City — Lanier Bridge
Front The first bridge crossing the Withlacoochee River at this site was built in the 1850's by slaves belonging to James Lanier. Replaced several times during the following century, the bridge served lumber, turpentine and cattle . . . — Map (db m66331) HM
Florida (Pasco County), Dade City — Site of Old Fort Dade
This is the site of Old Fort Dade built in 1835 and dedicated to Major Francis Dade — Map (db m67111) HM

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