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Greece, Attica Periphery, Athens — Areopagus Hill
[Left columns - text in Greek] [Right columns - text in English] The Areopagus, a rocky outcrop approximately 115 m. high is situated between three other hills, the Acropolis, the Pnyx, and the Kolonos Agoraios. Its name probably derives from Ares, the god of war, and the Ares-Erinyes or Semnes (also called the Eumenides), underground goddesses of punishment and revenge. A judicial body, the Areopagus Council, met on this hill to preside over cases of murder, sacrilege, . . . — Map (db m47716) HM
Greece, Attica Periphery, Athens — The Acropolis of Athens — [UNESCO World Heritage Site]
[Marker text printed in both Greek and English scripts:] The Acropolis and its monuments, universal symbols of the classical spirit and culture, form the greatest architectural and artistic whole that Greek Antiquity has bequeathed to the world. The most famous of these buildings were erected during the second half of the 5th century B.C., when Athens, with her victory over the Persians, and the establishment of the truest direct Democracy the world has ever seen, was leader . . . — Map (db m43648) HM
Greece, Attica Region (Central Athens Regional Unit), Athens — A. The Propylaia, B. The Shrine of Athena Hygieia and Hygieia
English Text: A. The Propylaia The Propylaia, the monumental entrance of the sanctuary of the Acropolis, was built at the west edge of the hill in the frame of the building programme of Perikles. The building's architect was Mnesikles, who applied ingenious and innovative architectural solutions. The construction of the Propylaia (437-432 B.C.) was interrupted by the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War, and as a result the original plan remained incomplete. The . . . — Map (db m85103) HM
Greece, Attica Region (Central Athens Regional Unit), Athens — A. The Sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia, B. The Chalkotheke
English Text: A. The sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia After passing through the Propylaia, the sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia, the so-called Brauronion, lies to the right of the processional way of the Acropolis. It was associated with the early sanctuary of Artemis in Brauron, a coastal town in eastern Attica. Artemis was worshipped as the goddess of nature and hunting, and she was the protector of girls, expecting mothers and women with newborn babies. It is . . . — Map (db m85203) HM
Greece, Attica Region (Central Athens Regional Unit), Athens — The "Old Temple" of Athena
The large Archaic temple to the south of the Erechtheion, which today preserves only its foundations, was called the "Old Temple" according to epigraphic evidence. Dedicated to Athena Polias, the patron deity of the city, it housed the xoanon, the wooden cult statue of the goddess to which the Athenians offered a peplos during the Panathenaic festival. The western section of the temple, consisting of three smaller parts, housed the cults of other divinities, possibly Hephaistus, . . . — Map (db m85232) HM
Greece, Attica Region (Central Athens Regional Unit), Athens — The Erechtheion
English Text: The elegant building of the Ionic order is called, according to later literary sources, Erechtheion from the name of Erechtheus, the mythical king of Athens. The construction started before the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War (431 B.C.) or after the conclusion of the "peace of Nikias" (421 B.C.) and was finished in 406 B.C., after the interruption of the works because of the war. The peculiar plan of the building is due to the natural irregularity of the . . . — Map (db m85173) HM
Greece, Attica Region (Central Athens Regional Unit), Athens — The Parthenon
English Text The Parthenon was a temple dedicated to Athena Parthenos (Virgin). It is built in the Doric order and made of white Pentelic marble with a width of 30.86 meters, a length of 69.51 meters and a height of 15 meters. It has an outer colonnade (pteron) of 8 columns on the short and 17 columns on the long sides, as well as an inner colonnade (prostasis) of 6 columns on the short sides. The interior of the temple was divided into the pronaos, the . . . — Map (db m85214) HM
Greece, Attica Region (Central Athens Regional Unit), Athens — The Statue of Athena Promachos
English Text: The colossal bronze statue of Athena, known as Athena Promachos, dominated in the area between the Propylaia and the Erechtheion, to the left of the visitor walking along the processional way of the Acropolis. It was made by the renowned sculptor Pheidias probably at the bronze foundry situated at the southwest slope of the Acropolis. The Athenians dedicated the statue to Athena, to express their gratitude for her contribution to the victories in the Persian Wars. . . . — Map (db m85182) HM
Greece, Central Macedonia Region (Regional unit of Thessaloniki), Thessaloniki — ThessalonikiΘεσσαλονίκη
The exhibition presents the history of Thessaloniki from its founding to the modern era. The founding of the city, its urban plan development, its people, its economy and its culture are the main topics that the exhibition addresses. In other words, it draws a comprehensive portrait of a city that has been a cosmopolitan urban centre throughout history. The exhibition uses multimedia applications, printed graphic compositions and some archaeological material; its thematic units are . . . — Map (db m84724) HM
Greece, Central Macedonia Region (Regional unit of Thessaloniki), Thessaloniki — White TowerΛευκος Πυργος
The White Tower, which came to be the symbol of Thessaloniki by coincidence, was built in the late 15th century on the site of an older Byzantine tower, where the eastern wall and the sea wall met. The White Tower is 33.9 meters high and comprises a ground floor and six storeys with a turret at the top. Up until the early 20th century, the Tower was surrounded by a low octagonal wall, which was probably built in 1535/36; three of the corners were reinforced with smaller towers. The . . . — Map (db m84701) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — "Kouloures""Kουλούρες"
English Text: Three large pits, known as "Kouloures" (rings) (Figure 1), with stone-lined walls were built in the West Court during the Old Palace period (1900-1700 B.C.). The excavation workmen gave them their name and Arthur Evans kept it. The function of the circular pits is not clear. They have been interpreted as rubbish dumps either for all the refuse from the Palace or just the leftovers from sacred offerings. Support has also been given to the idea that they were for . . . — Map (db m85436) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — "North Lustral Basin"
English Text: The room before you resembles a cistern. Its floor is lower than the surrounding area and is reached by steps. The "Lustral Basin" was surrounded by columns and was lined with slabs of gypsum giving it a luxurious appearance. In its present form, the area has been completely reconstructed by Evans (Figure 1). Areas with a similar arrangement have been found in other parts of the Palace of Knossos, as well as at other palaces and in important Minoan buildings of . . . — Map (db m85439) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — "Piano Nobile"
English Text: The great staircase and the upper floor to which it leads are largely Evan's creations. Evans thought that it had a function rather like the first floor of Italian Palazzi of the Renaissance, which was called the "Piano Nobile" (Figure 1). In this instance, he considered that the important reception rooms of the Palace would lie on the upper floor. Evans also thought that there existed a shrine, the "Tri-Columnar Shrine", and its Treasury. The basis for his . . . — Map (db m85453) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — "Shrine of the Double Axes"
English Text: The room before you was made into a shrine at the end of the Postpalatial period (1375-1200 B.C.). It is known as the "Shrine of the Double Axes" (Figure 1). On a bench at the back, different ritual objects were found amongst which were a stone double axe and votive clay idols (Figure 2). Similar small shrines have been found in houses of the same period. — Map (db m85476) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — "Theatral Area", "Royal Road"
English Text: The area before you was called the "Theatre" by Evans because its shape reminded him of later theatres (Figure 1). It is a platform and rows of steps that form an angle. At the bottom of the steps is the end of a narrow raised road that divides a paved court. Evans believed that the court was used for ceremonies watched by the standing viewers. The raised paved road continues in the opposite direction. It passes underneath the modern road to Herakleion connecting . . . — Map (db m85403) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — "Throne Room""Αίθουσα του Θρόνου"
English Text: You are in the antechamber of a complex of rooms that Evans named the "Throne Room". Its name comes from the stone seat found in the room behind the antechamber (Figure 1). Stone benches are preserved in the antechamber, and between them were discovered traces of a burnt wooden construction. Today, a wooden seat has been placed here which is a copy of the stone one in the neighboring chamber. After the antechamber is the central room of the complex. Right and left . . . — Map (db m85440) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — Palace of KnossosMain Visitor's Route
English Text: 1. West Court 2. "Kouloures" 3. "West Porch" 4. "Processional Causeway" 5. "South House" 6. "South Propylaeum" 7. "West Magazines" 8. "Throne Room" 9. "Tripartite Shrine" 10. Central Court 11. Copy of the "Prince of the Lilies" fresco 12. "Grand Staircase" 13. "Shrine of the Double Axes" 14. "Queen's Megaron" 15. "Hall of the Double Axes" 16. "Lapidary's Workshop" and "School room" 17. "Magazine of the Giant Pithoi" 18. "Corridor of . . . — Map (db m85412) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — Conservation - restoration of the "West Magazines"
The complex of the "West Magazine", an impressive row of eighteen long, narrow spaces (numbered in Latin numerals from one to eighteen), forms the main storage area of the Palace of Knossos. The construction-restoration work, undertaken between 2006 and 2009 in the context of the "Palace and Archaeological Site of Knossos" project, focussed on the southern, unroofed "Magazines III-VII". It was essential to conserve and restore not only the masonry but also the floors . . . — Map (db m85556) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — North Entrance, North Pillar Hall
English Text: An open air passage linked the Central Court with the North Entrance. It was paved and sharply inclined towards the north. The passage is narrow. Right and left were two raised colonnades known as "Bastions" (Figure 1). Arthur Evans reconstructed the "Bastion" on the west side. He also placed a copy of a restored relief fresco of a bull here. The wall painting may have formed part of a hunting scene. The passage ends in a large hall with ten square . . . — Map (db m85549) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — South Entrance, Corridor with the "Prince of the Lilies" Fresco
English Text: The south part and south facade of the Palace is very eroded. Today one can only see foundations on tiered levels. At the bottom, a tower-like projection is all that remains of the south entrance to the Palace. An ascending corridor led to the Central Court. The section of the corridor closest to the Central Court is reconstructed. Evans put a copy of a relief wall painting here, of which only a few fragments were found (Figure 1). On these it was possible to make . . . — Map (db m85469) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — The "Hall of the Double Axes" and the "Queen's Megaron"
English Text: Archaeological information concerning political organization during the Minoan period is very limited. Nevertheless, the mythological tradition concerning King Minos and Evan's notions concerning the institution of kingship have influenced interpretations of the Palace and its spaces. The "Royal Apartments" have been located in this region. The "Hall of the Double Axes" The "Hall of the Double Axes" (Figure 1) was so named by Evans due to the . . . — Map (db m85496) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — The “Magazines of the Giant Pithoi”, and the “East Bastion”
English Text: The great pithoi (storage jars) you see before you, were found in a place named by Evans, the "Magazines of the Giant Pithoi" (Figure 1). These magazines are one of the older parts of the Palace. The pithoi are set apart by their size, number of handles and the richness of their relief decoration with ropes and discs. On the right you see a staircase which has been reconstructed by Evans and descends to the east entrance of the Palace. The entrance is a robust . . . — Map (db m85506) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — The work of the Knossos Scientific Committee on the Palace and the archaeological site
English Text: The "Palace and Archaeological Site of Knossos" project, intended both to deal with the various problems faced by the monument and to promote it, was included in the 3rd Community Support Fund (CSF) in 2000, to be implemented by the Archaeological Receipts Fund. The Knossos Scientific Committee has been responsible for coordinating the project since 2001. The Technical Bulletins of the 3rd CSF project comprised an integrated programme for the conservation, . . . — Map (db m85562) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — Water and Drainage Conduits
English Text: In front of you can be seen part of the water system that channelled drinking water from a source in the vicinity of the palace. This took the form of a series of clay pipes with one end narrower than the other so that they could fit together, thereby increasing the water pressure and allowing it to flow more easily (figure 1, 2). The rectangular cut stone on your left, with the hollow in the upper side, is part of the drainage system linked to the perpendicular . . . — Map (db m85520) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — West Magazines
English Text: Looking down, you can see the start of the corridor that joins eighteen long and narrow storerooms, covering an area of 1300 square meters (Figure 1). In the floor of both the storerooms and corridor, there are ninety-three rectangular cists, the so-called "Kassellas". From the finds it appears they were used for keeping safe precious equipment and vases. There are also even larger cists in the corridor, internally lined, perhaps to hold liquids. The pithoi . . . — Map (db m85449) HM
Greece, Crete (Heraklion), Knosos — West WingΔυτική Πτέρυγα
English Text: The stairs on the right lead from the Central Court to the upper floor of the West Wing. This is largely reconstructed by Evans. The area left of the stairs has been identified as a shrine, called by Evans the "Tripartite Shrine". Its facade had columns and was divided into three parts, the central element being the highest. There is a depiction of a comparable shrine on a wall painting now on display in Herakleion Museum. Inside the shrine were found clay tablets . . . — Map (db m85442) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — Ancient Theater
English Text: The ancient theater of Philippi is a very important monument, located on the southeastern hillside of the acropolis leaning against the eastern city wall. Its initial phase is dated in the reign of the King of Macedonia Philip II (middle of the 4th c. BC). The Roman colonizers continued to use the Hellenistic theater but they remodeled it in order to be adapted to the new spectacles of the Roman society and to receive a multitude of spectators from the city and the . . . — Map (db m84753) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — Annexes to Octagon at Philippi
North of the octagonal church, and with the Hellenistic tomb-heroon continuing to function as nucleus, the spaces of prothesis, diakonikon, phiale and baptistery were developed. The later consisted of apodyterium, catechumena, baptistery and chrismarion. As a natural continuation, during the Christian period the heroon was transformed into a place of worship of an unknown martyr or even the Apostle Paul himself. Further north, on the via Egnatia, the transition to the . . . — Map (db m84813) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — Archeological Area Filippi
Αρχαιολογικός Χώρος Φιλίππων 1. Acropolis 2. Neapolhs Gate 3. Theatre 4. Sanctuary of Sylvanus 5. Sanctuary with Three Niches 6. Basillica A 7. Heroon 8. Prison of Saint Paul 9. Forum 10. Commercial Agora 11. Basillika B 12. Palaestra 13. Baths - Assembly 14. V A Egnatia 15. Bishops Palace 16. Octagon Church 17. Balneum . . . — Map (db m84743) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — Basilica
English Text: It was built as a great three-aisled, timber-roofed basilica with a transept on the east side. Its dimensions are 130x50 m. There is a monumental semi-circular propylon with marble stairs that leads from the Forum to the columned courtyard of the temple. From the courtyard, two entrances lead to the four-sided atrium, which has galleries on its three sides (east, north and south) while its western side is shaped as a two level fountain. The connection between the . . . — Map (db m84772) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — Christian Philippi
English Text: Philippi was a flourishing city in eastern Macedonia during the Hellenistic, Roman, and Early Christian periods, with continuous habitation from the mid-4th century BC to the 14th century AD. The city's 3500-meter long fortification wall was repaired and supplemented during the Roman and Byzantine periods. The start of the Christian period at Philippi was marked by the arrival of the Apostle Paul in 49-50 AD and the founding of the first Christian community on . . . — Map (db m84801) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — Philippi
English text: The ancient city of Philippi was built on the fringes of the marshes that occupied the south-east part of the plain of Drama. The first settlers were colonists from Thasos who were aware of the rich sources of precious metals, timber, and agricultural products in the region and therefore founded the colony of Krenides in 360 BC. The new colony was soon threatened by the Thracians and in 356 BC sought the aid of Philip II, king of Macedonia. Discerning the economic and . . . — Map (db m84747) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Kavala Regional Unit), Krinides — The Octagon at Philippi
English Text In the first insula east of the Roman Forum at Philippi. between the eastward extensions of Egnatia and Emporiki streets, is the metropolitan church of Philippi, the famous Octagon, which is dedicated to the Apostle Paul. Secondary cross roads, the parodoi, ensured communication between the two large streets and demarcated the individual buildings that surrounded it. The Octagon is a characteristic example of building a Christian church on the . . . — Map (db m84804) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Regional unit of Kavala), Kavala — Black Sea - Silk Road
Marker's English Text: Kavala The history of the town begins in the 7th century BC, in the reign of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great, flourished here the seaport of Neapolis (Kavala) which served the city of Philippi. In 49 AD St. Paul disembarked in the port and began preaching for the first time Christianity in Europe. In the 8th century AD the town changed its name to Christoupoli. In 1391 the town was destroyed and then occupied by the Turks. In 1470 it . . . — Map (db m84727) HM
Greece, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region (Regional unit of Kavala), Kavala — Neapolis-Christoupolis-Kavala (7th C.BC. - 20th C.AD.)
Marker's English Text: Historical Outline The Panagia peninsula has been inhabited since the Early Iron Age (1050-700 BC). In the second half of the 7th century BC, Parian settlers from Thasos founded a new colony, Neapolis, in this key location. Capitalizing on a fertile hinterland and lucrative mines, the settlement flourished economically and culturally. After its submission to Philip II, Neapolis became the port of the newly-founded . . . — Map (db m84729) HM
Greece, Kalymnos (peripheral unit) (Pátmos municipality), Chorá — Historic Centre (Chorá)Monastery of Saint John the Theologian — World Heritage Site
[Marker text printed in Greek and English script:] 1999 The Historic Centre (Chorá) with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse World Heritage Site The Historic Centre (Chorá) with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse are inscribed in the List of World Heritage Sites of the Convention for the Protection of World Heritage of the UNESCO. Inclusion in the list recognizes the exceptional value of a cultural . . . — Map (db m43647) HM
Greece, Kalymnos (peripheral unit) (Pátmos Municipality), Skala Village — Liberation of PatmosCapt. Terence Bruce Mitford
[Marker text printed in both Greek and English scripts:] Erected by the Community of Patmos to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Liberation of the Island, 10 February 1944 by Terence Bruce Mitford Captain, Special Boat Services February 2004 — Map (db m43136) HM
Greece, Kalymnos peripheral unit (Patmos municipality), Chorá — Historic Centre (Chorá)Cave of the Apocalypse — World Heritage Site
1999 The Historic Centre (Chorá) with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse World Heritage Site The Historic Centre (Chorá) with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse are inscribed in the List of World Heritage Sites of the Convention for the Protection of World Heritage of the UNESCO. Inclusion in the list recognizes the exceptional value of a cultural site so that it may be protected for the benefit of all Humanity. — Map (db m43646) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Ancient Corinth
English Text: 1. Temple of Apollo 2. Lechaion Road 3. Propylaia 4. Bema 5. Race Course 6. Heroon of the Crossroads 7. Underground Shrine 8. Central Shops 9. South Stoa 10. Bouleuterion 11. South Basilica 12. Julian Basilica 13. Peirene Fountain 14. Peribolos of Apollo 15. Eurycleus Baths 16. Lechaion Road Basilica 17. North Building 18. Captive Facade 19. Northwest Stoa 20. West Terrace Temples 21. Babbius Monument 22. West Shops 23. . . . — Map (db m85149) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth
Αρχαιολογικός Χώρος Αρχαίας Κορίνθου English Text: Legend 1. Temple of Apollo 2. Lechaion Road 3. Propylaia on the Lechaion Road 4. Bema 5. Altar 6. Temple F 7. Temple G 8. Temple H 9. Temple J 10. Monument of Babies Philinus 11. Temple D 12. Temple K 13. Glauke . . . — Map (db m85135) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Buildings at the West End of Roman Agora
English Text: The buildings in the west end of the Roman Forum date from the 1st and 2nd century AD. In contrast to most temples of both Greek and Roman periods in Greece, the temples each stood on a high podium constructed of rubble and cement. Originally they were clad with marble revetment and had a staircase ascending their east side. The temples themselves had a simple rectangular cella faced with columns supporting the roof only on their east side. The route followed by . . . — Map (db m84867) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Glauke Fountain
English Text: The fountain of Glauke, a large cubic mass of limestone, was formed when the surrounding bedrock was quarried away. Originally, the fountain was contained within a long limestone ridge running west from Temple Hill. Pausanias, who described his visit to Corinth ca. A.D. 150, reports that the fountain received its name from Glauke, daughter of Creon the King of Corinth and the second wife of the hero Jason. Medea, Jason's first wife, in a fit of jealousy presented . . . — Map (db m84823) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Lechaion Road
English Text: Propylaie on the Lechaion Road The Propylaia, the main entrance to the Forum, consisted of three archways; one main and two smaller ones. At the time of Pausanias the gilded bronze chariots of Helios and Phaethon stood on this imposing building. The Propylaia dates from the 1st century A.D. The Lechaion Road The main north-south artery (cardo maximus) of the Roman city, ultimately linked the Agora of Corinth with the harbour . . . — Map (db m84967) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Peirene Fountain
English Text: Peirene is one of the most important topoi in the urban landscape of both Greek and Roman Corinth. Human activity is attested in the area from the Neolithic period, and the first efforts in water management date to the Geometric period. The facility was gradually embellished from the Archaic period forward, so that by the 2nd century B.C., it consisted of six chambers providing access to three deep draw basins supplied with water by conduits excavated hundreds of . . . — Map (db m84991) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Road Network
The route of the ancient traveler Pausanias through the Corinthian Forum at the 2nd century A.D., together with the results of the excavations conducted on the site by the American Archaeological School of Athens, give the modern visitor an idea about the main roadways of the ancient city from the classical to the roman period. At the same time, the modern visitor has the opportunity to see the remains of two main roads of the Roman city, the Lechaion and the Kenchraie road. The . . . — Map (db m84840) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Saint Paul in Corinth and the Bema of the Roman Forum
Saint Paul is also known as the Apostle of the Nations because of his missionary journeys throughout the eastern Mediterranean (46-58 AD) for the dissemination of Christianity. In this context he visited several Greek cities, including Samothrace, Philippi, Thessalonica, Berea, Athens, and, most importantly, Corinth. Corinth, a Roman imperial colony and capital of the province of Achaea (Peloponnese and Central Greece), experienced a period of great prosperity during the Roman era. Saint Paul . . . — Map (db m84891) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — South Stoa
English Text: The South Stoa, one of the largest porticoed buildings in ancient Greece, was built in the late 4th century B.C., to the south of the race track of Corinth. The excavation of it by the American School of Classical Studies was begun in 1933 and completed in 1948. The Stoa covers an area of about 0.4 hectares and measures 164.38 meters x 25.15 meters. Its facade has 71 Doric columns, and it had a second internal colonnade of 34 Ionic columns. The back part of the . . . — Map (db m85076) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Temple E
English Text: Standing 9.00 meters above the Forum, Temple E occupied as prominent a place in the Roman city as the Temple of Apollo. In its first phase, the temple had stone foundations, probably with a triple crepis measuring 44.00 x 23.50 meters, on which was constructed a limestone Doric temple with six columns across its facade. The temple enclosure was bounded by a wall to the west and by stoas on the north and south. It is dated to the early 1st century A.D., soon after . . . — Map (db m85084) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — Temple of Apollo
English Text: The seven standing columns of the Archaic temple are one of the most prominent landmarks of Corinth. Contrary to one's first impression, however, the view from this point is back of the building. The dedication of the temple to Apollo is deduced from Pausanias' description of Corinth combined with a small plaque which was dedicated to Apollo and fount in the area. Built in the middle of the 6th century B.C. to replace a destroyed 7th century predecessor, the temple is . . . — Map (db m84826) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — The Heroon at the Crossroads: an early sanctuary of Ancient Corinth
English Text: On the hillside where the Bema of the Roman Forum was later built and alongside a road leading southward to Acrocorinth, a cemetery had been delevoped during the Geometric period (1050 - 720 B.C.) Later on, during the Early Corinthian period (620 - 590 B.C.) one of the cemetery's graves was looted; it was the grave of an arthritic male, about 40-45 years old and 1.72 meters tall. As a direct result of this action, a cult activity started on the site, presumably . . . — Map (db m84915) HM
Greece, Peloponnese Region (Corinthia Regional Unit), Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) — The Rostra (Bema) of the Roman Forum
English Text: The Rostra was a complex marble structure dating from the middle of the 1st century A.D. which dominated the face of the terrace of the Upper Forum at Corinth. It took the form of an open propylon with a n-shaped ground plan, which stood on a rectangular pedestal measuring 15.6 x 7.2 meters. This pedestal had a crepis with two steps and on the north projected 3.00 meters above the level of the Lower Forum. Its superstructure consisted of eight pillars, the . . . — Map (db m84874) HM
Greece, Phthiotis Regional Unit (Municipality of Lamia), Thermopylae — The Battle of Thermopyles
In the year 480 B.C. in this sacred place called Thermopyles was carried out the most astonishing and unequal battle between few Greeks and a million of Persians. This battle is a landmark in the World’s History. Three hundred Spartans and seven hundred Thespians under the orders of Leonidas, king of Sparta, decided to fight against the Persians and win or die defending the freedom of their country. According to the historian Herodotus, the Persian army consisted of about . . . — Map (db m84416) HM WM
Greece, Regional unit of Phthiotis (Municipality of Lamia), Thermopylae — Kolonos Hill Memorial
Greek translation of text: Ὦ ξεῖν', ἀγγέλλειν Λακεδαιμονίοις ὅτι τῇδε κείμεθα, τοῖς κείνων ῥήμασι πειθόμενοι. English translation of . . . — Map (db m84693) WM
Greece, Thera Municipality (Santorini), Fira — Santorini Cable Car
IΔPYMA ΛOYΛAΣ KAI EYAΓΓEΛOY NOMIKOY TEΛEΦEPIK ΣANTOPINH Σ ΔΩPEA TOY IΔPYTH ΣTIΣ 14 KOINOTHTEΣ TOY NHΣIOY Loulas and Evangelos Nomikos Foundation Santorini’s Cable Car Gift of the founder to the 14 communities of the island — Map (db m43315) HM
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