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United Kingdom, CambridgeshireCambridge — Great St. Mary’s Datum
This disk marks the datum point from which in 1725 William Warren, Fellow of Trinity Hall, began to measure the one mile points along the roads from Cambridge at which were then set up the first true milestones in Britain since Roman times. — Map (db m68118) HM
United Kingdom, CamdenLondon — Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
In this house the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded in 1848 — Map (db m68122) HM
United Kingdom, Greater LondonGreenwich — Greenwich Foot Tunnel
This tunnel constructed by the London County Council was opened in August 1902. Sir John MacDougall chairman of the Council; Lord Monkswell vice chairman; Henry Clarke deputy chairman; Col F. Sheffield chairman bridges comm; J. E. Sears vice chairman bridges comm; Sir Alex R Binnie MICE, Maurice FitzMaurice CMG, MICE, engrs; W. C. Copperthwaite MICE resident engineer. J. Cochrane & Sons contractors; J. Brown AMICE, contractors engineer. — Map (db m68120) HM
United Kingdom, Greater LondonLondon — George Orwell House
George Orwell 1903 – 1950 writer lived here — Map (db m68124) HM
United Kingdom, Greater LondonLondon — House of John Keats
John Keats, poet, — lived in this house. — B: 1795. D: 1821. — Map (db m68125) HM
United Kingdom, Greater LondonLondon — Toll Gate HouseSpaniards Gate
This eighteenth century building was erected to collect tolls from those passing through the western entrance to the estates of the bishops of London — Map (db m68119) HM
United Kingdom, Aberdeenshire (Scotland), Aberdeen — The Scottish Parliament
Presented by The Rt Hon Sir David Steel KBE MSP Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament to The City of Aberdeen To commemorate the occasion of the Scottish Parliament sitting in Aberdeen during the period Tuesday 28 to Thursday 30 May 2002 — Map (db m34056) HM
United Kingdom, Angus (Scotland), Arbroath — David Dunbar BuickSeptember 17 1854 – March 5 1929
American motoring pioneer & founder of the Buick motor company of America. David Dunbar Buick was born at No. 26 Green Street, Arbroath, which lay approx 90 metres north of this, the only remaining building to show the line of the original street. — Map (db m34452) HM
United Kingdom, City of Edinburgh (Scotland), Edinburgh — In Memory of Scottish-American Soldiers
(Front): In memory of Scottish-American soldiers To preserve the jewel of liberty in the framework of freedom - Abraham Lincoln (North Side):Sergeant Major John M'Ewan Co.H, 65th Regt Illinois Vol Infantry William L Duff, Lt Col., 2nd Illinois Regt of Artillery Robert Steedman Co.E, 5th Regt Maine Infantry Volunteers James Wilkie Co.C, 1st Michigan Cavalry Robert Ferguson Co.F, 57th Regt New York Infantry Volunteers (South Side):Alexander Smith . . . — Map (db m34260) HM
United Kingdom, City of Edinburgh (Scotland), Edinburgh — Scottish-American War Memorial
This memorial was initiated by the Scottish-American War Memorial Committee. the statue and bas-relief were sculpted by Canadian Robert Tait Mackenzie (1867-1938) and cast at the Roman Bronze Works, Brooklyn, New York, Mackenzie was a physician and Director of Physical Education at the University of Pennsylvania. The Craigleith sandstone setting was designed by architect Reginald Fairlie. The memorial was unveiled on the 7th September 1927 by U.S. Ambassador Houghton, who . . . — Map (db m34255) HM
United Kingdom, Dumfries & Galloway (Scotland), Portpatrick — Z4
In grateful appreciation for their rescue and recovery of the 301 TCS aircrew and their passengers, we thank the local community and all those who have memorialized our fallen brothers Dedicated 5 June 2007 By the 301st Aircraft Squadron Travis AFB, CA — Map (db m34061) HM
United Kingdom, England (Wiltshire), Amesbury — Welcome to StonehengeTime of Stonehenge
Stonehenge is a prehistoric temple, its great stones raised about 4,500 years ago. It is a masterpiece of engineering, with stones carefully arranged to line up with the movements of the sun. The ruin that we see today is the end result of many different stages of construction and rebuilding in prehistory. The first major even, 5,000 years ago, was the construction of a large circular enclosure. About 500 years later enormous sarsen stones were raised in a horseshoe and a circle, with . . . — Map (db m76858) HM
United Kingdom, Guernsey, Saint Peter Port — To the memory of Katherine Cawches, Guillemine Gilbert, Perotine Massey
All believers in the Lord Jesus Christ, who on, or about, 18th July 1556, and near this site, were cruelly burned to death at the stake for their Protestant faith. The latter named was pregnant at the time of martyrdom and gave birth to a son in the flames. The child was retrieved, but it was ordered that he be thrown back. Faithful unto death... Rev 2:10 Map (db m77552) HM
United Kingdom, Highland (Sutherland), Dornoch — Seaforth Highlanders1914 – 1919
Erected by The Seaforth Highlanders to the undying memory of 8432 comrades belonging to the ten battalions of the regiment who gave their lives for their country in the Great War Scotland For Ever — Map (db m34064) HM
United Kingdom, Kent, Dover — Blériot's 1909 Landing Site
After making the first Channel flight by aeroplane Louis Blériot landed at this spot on Sunday 25th July 1909. — Map (db m23521) HM
United Kingdom, Kent, Walmer — Caesar’s Invasion of Britain
The first Roman invasion of Britain led by Julius Caesar landed near here LV BC. — Map (db m24553) HM
United Kingdom, Lancashire, Fleetwood — S T Goth Memorial
This is the funnel of the trawler Goth which disappeared in a fierce storm off the North Cape of Iceland in December, 1948. There were 21 men onboard who had hoped to return from the fishing grounds to spend Christmas with their families. Deckhand Ernest Parker had been married for just two weeks. His best man, John Tandy left behind a wife and baby. Many of the young crewmen had survived wartime service and so had the Goth. Built in 1925, the ship was a coal-fired steam trawler. After . . . — Map (db m73282) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (Castle Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Bishop's Gate
It was here that James II demanded entry to the city during the 1689 siege. The present gate was built at the suggestion of Bishop Hervey in 1789 to celebrate the centenary of the siege. The head facing Bishop Street represents the river Boyne crowned by a laurel wreath: the date refers to the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The head facing outwards is the river Foyle: the date 1689 and the ship breaking the boom recall the relief of the 1689 siege. — Map (db m71021) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — Alphabet Angel
Symbols and Meanings Backpack with Hearts Contains forgotten words and meanings of the Ulster Scots tongue. Heart 1 Represents the heart of the land and the soul of the place. Heart 2 Represents the heart of the people, the spirit of the language. Flying Goggles The protection of vision for the insight of dialect. Belt Pouch Symbol of renewed currency of an ancient spoken tongue. Thistle Icon Represents the shared cultural . . . — Map (db m70763) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — Bushmills History & Heritage
The Salmon The natural life cycle of a salmon is one of nature's wonders. A salmon begins its life in the shallow water and gravel beds of the river as eggs then fry. These small fry stay in the river until they mature into par. The next stage of their life is when they mature into smolts and take on the colouring of the mature salmon. The smolts move downstream around May or June to begin their epic migration to feeding grounds in the north Atlantic. Here, they feed on fish, such . . . — Map (db m70892) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — Dunluce CastleCauseway Coastal Route
Side A Welcome to Dunluce Castle Dunluce Castle, dramatically positioned on this sheer headland between the Giant's Causeway and Portrush, was built between the 15th and 17th centuries. At this time it was one of the finest castles in the region and served to control the land and sea routes of North Ulster. Inside the castle you will discover centuries of stories and legends that reveal the turbulent history of the MacQuillans, the MacDonnells and the Scottish settlers who . . . — Map (db m70900) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — Giant’s Causeway and Bushmills Railway
The Giant’s Causeway railway provides a passenger link between the historic town of Bushmills and the famous basalt stone columns of the Giant’s Causeway World Heritage Site. The Railway is an interesting heritage experience and travels along a panoramic stretch of coast. The Railway was laid to the Irish narrow gauge of three feet and runs for two miles along the track bed of the former Giant’s Causeway Tramway. From the Bushmill’s Railway Station the line passes through the Bushfoot . . . — Map (db m70850) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — Hamill TerraceCauseway Coastal Route
Side A Welcome to Hamill Terrace Renowned as the gateway to the Giant's Causeway and for the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world, Bushmills has a unique heritage of historic buildings and mills. Images (clockwise from top): Bushmills Mills, Bushmills Distillery sign, The Causeway Tram c.1890 [Map and Causeway Coastal Route Journey linear locator] Side B Among many prizes, Bushmills whiskey was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Exhibition of . . . — Map (db m70873) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — Sgt. Robert Quigg
Dedicated to the memory of Sgt. Robert Quigg, 12th Battalion R.I.R. who won the V.C. at the Battle of the Somme on the 1st July 1916 Died 14th May 1955 — Map (db m70774) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Bushmills — World Wars Memorial
To the men of this town & district who gave their lives for their country in the Great War 1914 – 1919 [Rolls of Honored Dead] Killed in the 1939-1945 War [Roll of Honored Dead] — Map (db m70773) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Antrim), Dunseverick — Dunseverick CastleCauseway Coastal Route
Dunseverick Castle and its rocky peninsula were given to the National Trust in 1962 by farmer Jack McCurdy. The term Dun (fort) indicates a royal site. This was the fort of Sobhairce. It may have been a royal stronghold in the Iron Age (around 500 B.C.) and traditionally was one of the great duns of Ireland. St. Patrick reputedly visited Dunseverick in the 5th Century. The extensive earthworks on the headland may be the remains of the royal fort from which the Antrim kingdom of . . . — Map (db m70859) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Belleek — Donegal Corridor
During the Second World War (1939-1945) Sunderland and Catalina Flying Boats from RAF Castle Archdale were given permission by the neutral Irish Free State government to fly along the River Erne between Belleek and Ballyshannon. This was known as the Donegal Corridor. Young airmen flew out to the mid-Atlantic to give protection to shipping convoys. A number of planes crashed in the locality. This plaque is in memory of the airmen and seamen from America, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, . . . — Map (db m72536) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Belleek — The Enamel Grindstone
Enamel colours have always been used to decorate pottery wares. Today they come processed but in early years of the Belleek Pottery they, along with most raw materials, were processed at the Pottery. This particular grindstone was used to crush and mix the raw enamel colours. Enamel colours are made from the oxides of metals. Each metal's oxide gives a different colour, e.g. browns and blacks from Iron oxide, greens from Copper oxide, and blues from Cobalt oxide. — Map (db m72561) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Belleek — Welcome to Belleek
Beal Leice, meaning 'the mouth of the flagstone', lies in the most westerly point of Northern Ireland, hidden in the Erne valley between the Sligo mountains and the Atlantic. The village, which was first laid out during the Plantation of Ulster about 1610, originated as a fort standing at the highest crossing point on the River Erne, a river which is part of the most extensive inland waterway in Western Europe. Today it has a population of 790. Belleek Pottery Established in 1857, . . . — Map (db m72553) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Enniskillen — Cole's Monument
In memory of General the Honorable Sir Galbraith Lowry Cole, G.C.B. Colonel of the 27th Regiment Pyrenees • Nivelle • Orthez Toulouse • Olivença • Albuera Salamanca • Vittoria • Martinique Guadaloupe • Egypt • Maida — Map (db m72631) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Enniskillen — German 21cm Mortar, 1918
Captured during the Great War 1914-1918 Presented in commemoration of the award of the Victoria Cross on 29th October, 1914 to Lieutenant J.A.O. Brooke 2nd Battn. The Gordon Highlanders "For conspicuous bravery and great ability near Gheluvelt, on the 29th October in leading two attacks on the German trenches under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire, regaining a lost trench at a very critical moment. He was killed on that day. By his marked coolness and promptitude on . . . — Map (db m72647) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Enniskillen — German 77mm Light Artillery Gun
This gun was originally a German 77mm Light Artillery Gun from the first world war [sic]. It was captured in Belgium in 1918 by men of the Inniskillings in the 36th (Ulster) Division. The gun was placed in the Regimental Depot of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in Omagh (St Lucia Barracks). At the approach of the second world war [sic] it was removed to Woolrich Arsenal, London and converted for coastal artillery. This is what you see now. After the war it was returned to . . . — Map (db m72649) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Enniskillen — South Africa War Memorial1899 - 1902
In Honoured Memory of 20 Officers 47 Non-commissioned Officers and 215 Men of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons and Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers who sustained the great reputation of these distinguished regiments for prowess in arms and devotion to their Sovereign and Country, fell in battle or died of wounds or sickness in South Africa 1899-1902 [Regimental Rolls of Honored Dead] — Map (db m72651) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Enniskillen — The Watergate and Flag of St George
The Watergate The Watergate is the name given to the twin turreted building added to the outer wall of the castle c. 1615. Scottish in style, it was almost certainly built by William Cole, constable of the castle and founder of Enniskillen town. Its name may have come from an earlier gate nearby, marked 'Watergatte' on a map of 1594, which opened on to the water but has long since disappeared. Immediately inside the 'Watergate' is a deep well, an important feature for a castle under . . . — Map (db m72648) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Enniskillen — World Wars Memorial
Our Glorious Dead 1914 - 1918 1939 - 1945 [Roll of Honored Dead] — Map (db m72620) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Irvinestown — Centenary Gardens House 1St. Patrick Meets the Mystery, Legends and Religion of Ireland
In this house the story of St. Patrick meeting the legends and spiritual traditions of the Celtic People in Ireland is presented. St. Patrick became familiar with them during his time of captivity. The Celtic Religion of Ireland Before St. Patrick The Celts believed that gods and spirits were everywhere. They had sun worship, tree worship and wind worship. This is a hymn to nature by the Celtic poet Amergrin who lived 500 years before Christ. 'I am the wind that breathes upon . . . — Map (db m72630) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Irvinestown — Memorials to the Great Irish Famine in County FermanaghIn Memory of All Buried Here — 1845 • The Great Famine • 1850
In 1836 the Poor Law Enquiry found that over one third of people in Ireland were dependent on the potato as their main source of food. The population had grown to 8.2 million by 1841, and was vulnerable to any failure of the potato crop. The Great Famine (1845-1849), caused by potato blight, resulted in a national catastrophe. The Poor Law In an attempt to alleviate the problems arising from widespread poverty in early 19th century Ireland a new Poor Law was enacted in 1838. . . . — Map (db m72600) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Irvinestown — Welcome to Irvinestown
The town takes its name from the Irvine family who were the landlords of the district and came from Bonshaw in Scotland in the 17th century. They lived at Castle Irvine which today is known as Necarne Castle. The town was first known as Lowtherstown but in the 1860's its name was changed to Irvinestown. It is the third largest town in Fermanagh with a population of 2,244. It is famous for its wide Main Street and ample parking facilities. The town is proud of its vision, innovation and . . . — Map (db m72609) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Lisnaskea — Castle Balfour
Castle Balfour, built for Sir James Balfour of Glenawley by about 1620, was one of many castles designed to secure the plantation in Ulster during the 17th century. It is of the Scottish-style strong house type, identifiable by such characteristic features as corbelled stair turrets and parapets, high pitched gables and tall chimneys. In 1619 Captain Nicholas Pynnar described Castle Balfour which was just being built, as 'a Bawne of Lime and Stone 70 ft square, of which two sides are . . . — Map (db m71324) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Fermanagh), Lisnaskea — Lisnaskea Market Cross
This cross was set up in the Corn and Potato Market when it was built by Mr John Crichton, later third Earl of Erne, in 1841. At that time the small stone cross was made and placed on the ancient and much more massive shaft. The original site of the cross is unknown, though there are several traditions about it. One is that the shaft formerly stood at Fawney cross-roads, east of Lisnaskea, and was used for swearing oaths. The base is said to have been dug up somewhere near the town, or . . . — Map (db m72653) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — ... Free, entire and perfect
A city fit for war and merchandise...for ever a free, entire and perfect city and county of itself, to be called the city and county of Derrie. Charter from James I, 1604 One City...Fifty Names All of the city's names over the centuries refer back to the Irish 'daire' or 'doire' - the oak grove. The oldest is Daire Calgach, suggesting that a fierce warrior may have had a fortress here in pre-Christian times. In the 12th century the settlement was known as Doire Cholmcille . . . — Map (db m70942) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Arthur Joyce Lunel Cary1888 - 1957 — Ulster History Circle
Novelist was born here — Map (db m71124) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Artillery Bastion
A night at Talbot's theatre Actor/manager Michael Atkins opened the city's first purpose-built theatre at the top of Artillery Street in 1774. It soon became the fashionable place to be seen especially at grand social occasions when the Assize judges were in town. Dashing young military officers scanned the audience to pick out the belles. By 1830, however, polite society had deserted the theatre on the grounds that audiences were rowdy and made up of 'the lower orders'. The building . . . — Map (db m71080) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Austins Department Store
The World's Oldest Independent Department Store ——————— Established in 1830 by its founder Thomas Austin (1815-1892) — Map (db m71132) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Battle of the BogsideThe Guide to Free Derry
[Side A] On 12 August 1969, as the Apprentice Boys Parade passed the edge of the Bogside, nationalists clashed with parade followers and police. The police and loyalists followed the nationalists back into the Bogside, where defences had been prepared. For the next three days this community held off a sustained attack from the police, who couldn’t pass the defenders on the roof of Rossville Flats. On 14 August the British army was brought in to replace the defeated and exhausted . . . — Map (db m71441) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Bernadette
The Artists' first coloured mural is a tribute to the women of Derry and their role in the civil rights campaign. Bernadette Devlin, Britain's youngest MP, addresses the crowd during the Battle of the Bogside: her actions resulted in a six month jail sentence for inciting and taking part in a riot. The woman to her left bangs a dustbin lid on the ground to alert neighbours to the arrival of the authorities. The triangle motif inspired by the gable end is repeated throughout the painting. . . . — Map (db m71187) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Bishop's Gate
The centenary of the siege In 1789 the cannons roared in peace, the bells rang out and the Protestant and Catholic bishops processed together to St Columb's Cathedral to celebrate the centenary of the siege. To mark the event Bishop Hervey proposed rebuilding Bishop's Gate as a grand new entry to the city. The original design by Henry Aaron Baker featured a large statue of William III on horseback over the arch. No Surrender 18th April, 1689 was a momentous day in the city's . . . — Map (db m71012) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Bloody Sunday
This mural depicts the events of 30th January 1972 when the British Army opened fire on a civil rights demonstration, killing 14 people. A local priest waves a bloodstained handkerchief at the soldiers as he leads a group of men, carry the body of the youngest victim, away from the scene of the shooting. A soldier stands on a civil rights banner: this speaks of the price that people pay for democratic freedom. What makes our work unique is that, both as artists and as citizens, we are . . . — Map (db m71215) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Bloody Sunday30 January 1972
On 30 January 1972, a massive British military operation in Derry's Bogside ended in the murder of thirteen unarmed civil rights demonstrators and the wounding of fifteen others - one of whom died later of his injuries on 16 June 1972. The British army labelled the victims gunmen and bombers. They claimed their soldiers had met a "fusillade of fire". No soldier or vehicle was hit. Derry Coroner Hubert O'Neill later declared the killings "sheer unadulterated murder". The hundreds of . . . — Map (db m71306) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Bloody SundayThe Guide to Free Derry
On 30 January 1972 the ‘elite’ British Parachute Regiment opened fire on a peaceful civil rights march along this street, killing 14 unarmed marchers and wounding 14 more. The dead and wounded were labelled gunmen and bombers by a partisan British judicial inquiry, and it was to be another 38 years before a second public inquiry forced the British government to admit what everyone else already knew, that all those killed and injured were innocent, and the shootings were “unjustified . . . — Map (db m71435) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Butcher Gate
Two million gallons of whisky Smoke from illicit poteen whisky stills used to waft over the walls from the Bogside. Legal distilleries opened in the Waterside and in the Bogside in the 1820s. Watt's Abbey Street distillery became the largest in Ireland producing two million gallons of grain whisky a year by the 1880s. The works was as large as two football pitches, its seven-storey high building still being the city's tallest after St Columb's Cathedral. The distillery closed in 1921. . . . — Map (db m70971) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Butcher Gate
This was one of the four original gates of 1617. It was initially called the 'Nugate' or King's Gate, later being renamed Butcher Gate after the nearby meat market and slaughterhouse. The gate was nearly destroyed by cannon fire during the 1689 siege. The present gate, built in the 1800s, is nearly twice the height of the original. — Map (db m70972) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Castle Gate
Demolish the walls The Maiden City withstood two sieges without its walls being breached. In the 18th century the city grew too big for its walls and increasingly houses and factories were built on the slopes below. Castle Gate (1803) was the second breach in the walls to deal with increased traffic. Thirty years later businessmen campaigned to demolish the walls entirely to solve the traffic problems. They failed and traffic continued to clog the city's streets. The . . . — Map (db m70960) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Castle Gate
Constructed in 1803 this was the second of the three new gates into the city. Although originally named New Gate, by the mid 19th century it was known as Castle Gate after the medieval tower house built by the O'Doherty family. — Map (db m70970) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Church Bastion
The watchers and the watched There have been watchers on the walls for centuries. In 1627 two watch towers were built near the Cathedral after the guards complained about having to do duty in the rain. In the 19th century the bastions became gardens and most watch towers were demolished: one still survives near here. During the Troubles the British army erected sangars close to the walls to watch over the city. The towers combined accommodation for soldiers with high technology . . . — Map (db m71053) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Civil Rights
This mural captures the mood of a typical civil rights march in the years up to 1972. Inspired by the civil disobedience campaign of Martin Luther King in the United States, young and old, Catholics and Protestants, politicians and mothers took to the streets to march for their democratic rights. Our intention was to describe it as it was, a happy, almost festive occasion conducted by people who were content that they were standing up, at long last, against prolonged injustice. — Map (db m71434) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Death of InnocenceAnnette McGavigan
Annette McGavigan Aged 14 Shot dead by the British Army 6 September 1971 ——————— Here the innocence of a child's world contrasts vividly with the chaotic violence with which others have surrounded her. The mural commemorates fourteen year old Annette McGavigan who was shot by a British soldier in 1971, the 100th victim of the Troubles and one of the first children to be killed. The little coloured stones at her feet are objects that . . . — Map (db m71155) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
Livery Companies of the City of London Demi-culverin (G1) Bore 4-5" - Length 108" Weight 3333lb Sent to the city in May-June 1642 by the Worshipful Company of Vintners. Probably cast by John Browne at one of his works in Kent. — Map (db m70999) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
Livery Companies of the City of London Demi-culverin (C3) Bore 4.25" - Length 120" Weight 3750lb One of a pair sent to the city in May-June 1642 by the Worshipful Company of Merchant Taylors. Probably cast by John Browne at one of his works in Kent. — Map (db m71049) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
Livery Companies of the City of London Demi-culverin (C11) Bore 4.6" - Length 120" Weight 3988lb The second of a pair sent to the city in May-June 1642 by the Worshipful Company of Merchant Taylors. Probably cast by John Browne at one of his works in Kent. — Map (db m71052) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
Livery Companies of the City of London Demi-culverin (C4) Bore 4.92," Length 90," Weight 2795lb Sent to the city in May-June 1642 by the Worshipful Company of Salters. Probably cast by John Browne at one of his works in Kent. — Map (db m71083) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
Livery Companies of the City of London Demi-culverin (C9) Bore 4.8," Length 120," Weight 3977lb Sent to the city in May-June 1642 by the Worshipful Company of Mercers. Probably cast by John Browne at one of his works in Kent. — Map (db m71099) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
Demi-culverin with Rose and Crown (C12) Bore 4.5", Length 120" Weight 3417lb Cast in 1590 by Thomas Johnston Founder of iron ordnance to Queen Elizabeth I — Map (db m71125) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Demi-culverin Cannon
John Browne No.1 Demi-culverin (C8) Bore 4.7", Length 98" Weight 3117lb Cast by John Browne possibly at Horsmonden, Kent 1615-1625 — Map (db m71128) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Double Bastion
The city has always expressed its soul in verse. Derry mine! My small oak grove Little cell, my home, my love! Attributed to St. Colmcille The saint's story is told as St Columb in the Cathedral and as St Colmcille in Long Tower Church. The purple headed mountains, The river running by, The sunset and the morning That brightens up the sky.' Mrs Cecil Frances Alexander The 19th century hymn writer was inspired by the view of the Creggan Hills. 'My heart . . . — Map (db m71005) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Double Bastion
Roaring Meg Roaring Meg is the most famous of the city's cannon. She weighs a mighty 1794 kilograms. The Fishmongers' Company of London presented her to the city in 1642. She saw action in the 1689 siege, probably from this bastion. It could take up to six men to fire a large cannon. Two packed the gunpowder into the barrel and inserted the cannon ball. A third lit the fuse while the fourth aimed the cannon at the target. The force of the explosion could cause the gun carriage to roll . . . — Map (db m71007) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Ferryquay Gate
Locking the gates In 1688 James II proposed to replace the Protestant garrison in the city with Catholic troops. Rumours were rife that the citizens were to be massacred. Meeting in the Diamond, the city leaders could not make up their minds whether to admit the new garrison. Fourteen young men - the 13 Apprentice Boys and their look-out - lost patience. They drew their swords, ran to the guard house, seized the keys to the city, raised the drawbridge of Ferryquay Gate, and shut and . . . — Map (db m71097) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Ferryquay Gate
This gate was built in 1865 on the site of one of the four original entrances to the city. Like Bishop's Gate it had a drawbridge, which could be pulled up in times of troubles, to allow people to cross the dry moat. This was the gate that the Apprentice Boys locked in December, 1688. The carved heads are of Governor George Walker and Rev James Gordon who urged the citizens to refuse to admit James II's troops. — Map (db m71104) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Free Derry CornerYou Are Now Entering Free Derry — The Guide to Free Derry
On 5 January 1969, after a night of rioting and sustained police attacks on the Bogside, the words "You Are Now Entering Free Derry" were painted on the gable wall of 33 Lecky Road. This simple graffiti became the defining symbol of the civil rights era and an internationally recognised symbol of resistance to state injustice. The wall remains today, though the rest of the street was demolished in 1975. Binn Dhoire Saor Ar an 5 Eanáir 1969, tar éis oíche círéibe agus ionsaithe . . . — Map (db m71204) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — George Farquharc. 1677 - 1707 — Ulster History Circle
Playwright attended the Free School near this site — Map (db m70992) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Grand Parade
Fourteen sycamores There are 14 sycamore trees on the Grand Parade, one for each of the 13 Apprentice Boys and one for James Morrison, their look-out on Ferryquay Gate. The fruit of the sycamore are like bunches of keys. They represent the keys of the city with which the Apprentice Boys locked the gates. Parading and promenading In the 18th century the city garrison used this part of the walls for exercises and parades. It later became fashionable to promenade along the Grand . . . — Map (db m70984) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Guildhall Square
City under siege The city was twice besieged for over a hundred days. In 1649 the garrison held out against royalist troops during the English Civil War. Forty years later the city supported Protestant William III against Catholic James II in their struggle for the English throne. During the 105 day siege the citizens were under constant threat from cannon fire, bombs, disease and hunger. Carrying food and arms, the ships - the Mountjoy and the Phoenix - broke through the timber boom . . . — Map (db m70943) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Guildhall Square
The roaring cannon The city claims Europe's largest collection of cannon whose precise origins can be traced. These are the earliest surviving cannon. Some were shipped over for Sir Henry Docwra's campaign of 1600-3: others were sent to defend the Plantation city. Look for the marks stamped on the cannon - the rose and crown of the Tudor English kings, club and arrow marks, the date '1590' and the initials T.J. for Thomas Johnston, Queen Elizabeth I's gun founder. 'Wish you were . . . — Map (db m71131) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — H Block Hunger Strike Memorial
IRA. Vol. Bobby Sands, Born 9th March 1954 Died 5th May 1981 Age: 27 (66 Days). IRA. Vol. Francis Hughes, Born 28th Feb 1956 Died 12th May 1981 Age: 25 (59 Days) INLA. Vol. Patsy O'Hara, Born 11th July 1957 Died 21st May 1981 Age: 23 (61 Days) IRA. Vol. Raymond McCreesh, Born 25th Feb 1957 Died 21st May 1981 Age: 24 (61 Days) IRA. Vol. Joe McDonnell, Born 14th Step 1951 Died 8th July 1981 Age: 30 [sic - 29] (61 Days) Let Our Revenge Be The . . . — Map (db m71219) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Hangman's Bastion
Bulwarks and bastions When first built, the bastions were known as bulwarks, each called after a person associated with the city from King James I to the Governor of the Plantation. They were renamed during the 1689 siege. This is Hangman's Bastion where a man nearly killed himself when he became entangled in the rope which he was using to escape. The nearby Coward's Bastion, one of the three bastions that have been demolished, was the safest place in the city. Defending the . . . — Map (db m70957) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Hunger Strike
This mural depicts one of the surviving hunger strikers as he looked after 53 days without food. He was one of seven men who went on hunger strike at the Maze prison in Belfast from 28th October, 1980 in protest against loss of their rights as political prisoners. His image was beamed around the world on television. He is joined by one of the women from Armagh jail who went on strike in sympathy. Both are wrapped in blankets marking their refusal to wear prison uniform. Ours is a . . . — Map (db m71436) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — IRA Volunteers Honor Roll
Throughout this city the Republican Movement has marked the spots, with commemorative plaques where IRA Volunteers died on active service. This stone is dedicated to those Volunteers who died in places where circumstances do not permit the erection of a commemorative plaque. [Gaelic not transcribed due to stylized script] — Map (db m71283) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Magazine Gate
Magazine Gate is the city's newest gate, built in 1865. At the same time the wall between Magazine and Shipquay Gates was raised by two metres and ornamental battlements added. A line of stonework on the outside shows the height of the original walls. Above the arch are the sculpted heads of siege heroes, David Cairns and Colonel Adam Murray. — Map (db m70915) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Magazine Gate
Fire power Magazine Gate takes its name from the Plantation city's gunpowder store. The mixture of saltpetre, sulphur and fine charcoal had to be kept very dry as it easily absorbed water. A barrel of gunpowder and a pile of shot was placed beside each cannon when in use. The powder was carefully weighed and scooped into cloth or paper bags with a shovel before being packed inside the barrel of the cannon. Ramrods, linstocks and wadhooks Tools helped the team of gunners to . . . — Map (db m70956) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Mc Nutt, Phelan, and Mc Shane Memorial
In proud and loving memory of I.N.L.A. Volunteer Colm Mc Nutt Killed in Action 12th Decembert 1977 Comrade Patrick “Hessy” Phelan Murdered in New York, 21st January 1996 Comrade Dermot “Tonto” Mc Shane Murdered by British Army, 13th July 1996 “thig leo an reabhlóideach a mharú, Ach ní thig leo an réabhlóid a mharú choiche” — Map (db m71442) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Michael Browning
Near this spot was landed the body of Michael Browning Master of the ship Mountjoy of Londonderry - killed in action at the breaking of the boom, July 28th 1689.o.s. while leading the van of the relieving squadron against the forces of James II & Louis XIV. "He died by the most enviable of all deaths, in sight of the city which was his birth place, which was his home, and which had just been saved by his bravery and self-devotion from the most frightful form of . . . — Map (db m70925) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Motorman
Free Derry ended at 4am on 30th July 1972 when thousands of British troops in tanks and armoured cars invaded the Bogside and Creggan 'no-go' areas. During Operation Motorman, they tore down the barricades with bulldozers. The Artists chose the image of a soldier battering down a door to express the sheer ferocity of the onslaught. With its contrasting light and shadow, the mural becomes a powerful statement against war. Our work commemorates the real price paid by a naïve and . . . — Map (db m71284) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — New Gate
In 1787 the walls were breached for the first time to improve access to the city centre. It is said that the gate was built to cope with crowds flocking to the New Theatre in Artillery Street but was closed in 1799 due to complaints from the audience that the noise outside disturbed the performance. The gate was reopened and widened in the 1860s. — Map (db m71085) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Newgate Bastion
The first shot On 13th April, 1689 the first shot of the siege was fired. Citizens on the walls spotted the vanguard of the Jacobite army approaching under Lieutenant General Richard Hamilton. To make his presence known, Hamilton fired a shot which hit Newgate Bastion. The defenders could not retaliate as they had not yet been issued with arms. Goods to market Markets were always a feature of life in the city which served a large agricultural area. Over the centuries there . . . — Map (db m71098) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Newmarket Street
You are standing on the city walls. Newmarket Street slopes up and over the wall. The street was created in the mid 19th century on the site of the Smithfield Meat Market to allow carts to the new covered market. — Map (db m71100) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Royal Bastion
The siege governors The Royal Bastion is associated with the city's four governors during the 1689 siege. Professional soldier Robert Lundy was unconvinced that the city could be defended against Jacobite attack. His indecisiveness and refusal to admit additional troops into the overcrowded city led to his overthrow and flight. Major Henry Baker and Rev George Walker replaced him as joint governors. When Baker died of fever, Colonel John Mitchelburne took over his military duties. . . . — Map (db m70987) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Seán Keenan / Ó Cianáin
In proud and loving memory of Seán Keenan 1914 - 1993 Volunteer. Óglaigh na h-Éireann Chairperson. Derry Citizens' Defence Association Honorary Vice-President, Republican Sinn Fein Fluent Irish Speaker and active G.A.A. Supporter He spent 15 years interned without trial His life-long struggle against oppression and for the All-Ireland Republic continues to inspire his people His wife Nancy died 1st October 1970 Also his son Colm Died in active service on 14th . . . — Map (db m71208) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Shipquay Gate
This was one of the four original 17th century gates to the city. It had a watch tower, battlements and a portcullis. The carvings on the outside of the present gate, built between 1803-5, celebrate the city's wealth. The cornucopia is a symbol of plenty and the caduceus is a magic wand used by the Greek god Hermes to protect merchants. — Map (db m70927) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Shipquay Gate
'A city fit for war and merchandise' In 1600 Elizabeth I of England instructed Sir Henry Docwra to establish and fortify a new settlement on the Foyle. An explosion in the cathedral in 1567 had largely destroyed the town. Docwra and his 4200 troops re-used the stones and rubbish of the old buildings. He surrounded the main fort with earthen walls to protect it from attack by powerful local chiefs. Plantation city The Plantation city was the first planned town in . . . — Map (db m71123) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Shipquay Street
Living above the 'shop' Many banks and offices started life as 18th and 19th century family houses. The building at the corner of Shipquay Street and Bank Place was both home and place of business for the manager of the Belfast Bank. On 7th December 1888 there was much excitement when the manager's daughter gave birth to a son in one of the bedrooms. The son became the famous 20th century novelist Joyce Cary. Childhood holidays in Inishowen inspired his prize-winning 'House of . . . — Map (db m71140) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — St Columba
On this site of St Augustine's Church, St Columba built his Abbey circa 543AD, and departed from Derry down the River Foyle with his supporters to the Island of Iona in 563AD. — Map (db m70989) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — St Columb's Cathedral
The Mother Church The first settlers worshipped in the ruins of the former Augustinian abbey. In 1613 the London merchant companies sent over a silver-gilt chalice as a promise of their commitment to build a cathedral to grace their new city. The chalice remains a treasured possession of St Columb's Cathedral, originally built between 1628-33. It was the first cathedral to be erected in the British Isles after the Reformation and unusually was consecrated both as parish church of . . . — Map (db m71072) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Bloody Sunday Commemoration
This mural was painted to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. A circle frames the faces of the 14 victims with the youngest in the centre. The circle is the symbol of wholeness, the goal of the healing process. Fourteen oak leaves, the symbol of the city, surround the circle. The soft red colours convey sadness rather than anger. In the evening light with the sun shining directly on it, it can be very moving, even for us who painted it. Map (db m71158) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Peace Mural
This mural shows a dove and an oak leaf, as symbols of hope for the city’s future. The dove is the name of St Columba, the city’s founder, who is said to have built his monastery in an oak grove. The background mosaic of the colours of the spectrum expresses what the Artists mean by peace. The colours of the mural say that peace without freedom is no peace at all. — Map (db m71440) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Peace Process
After the 1981 hunger strikes the republican movement embarked on a political process that resulted in the IRA ceasefire in August 1994. Loyalist paramilitaries declared their ceasefire in October 1994. In 1998 local politicians and the British and Irish governments signed the Good Friday Agreement, which paved the way for the current locally elected assembly at Stormont. An Próiséas Síochána Tar éis stailceanna ocrais 1981 ghabh gluaiseacht na poblachta do phróiséas polaitiúil a . . . — Map (db m71218) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Petrol Bomber
For two days in August, 1969 local people resisted attempts by the Royal Ulster Constabulary to break down the barricades which they had erected to defend their community. The Battle of the Bogside ended when the British government sent in the Army. The mural depicts a young boy wearing a gas mask to protect himself from CS gas: he is holding a petrol bomb made from a milk bottle. This was our first mural and thought to be our best. As soon as the three of us painted it we knew we had . . . — Map (db m71168) HM WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Platform
The Apprentice Boys From the early 18th century clubs have celebrated the role of the 13 apprentices who locked the gates of the city in December, 1688 rather than admit the new Jacobite garrison. Local architect, John Guy Ferguson, designed The Apprentice Boys' Memorial Hall in the mid 1870s. The 1937 extension in Society Street was dedicated to those who died in the First World War. The Hall houses the headquarters of the Apprentice Boys of Derry Association. Every December the . . . — Map (db m70974) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Walled City
If 'stones could speak', what a story they would have to tell. Their voices still echo on the walls and in the city streets. According to tradition St. Colm Cille chose the oak grove on top of the hill for his monastery in 546 AD. His community became a beacon of light and learning throughout Europe. Around it grew a settlement with a stronghold, cathedral and port. In 1610 the City of London Companies agreed to build a new city on the Foyle in return for land in King James I's . . . — Map (db m70928) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Walled City
[Keyed photo of Double Bastion overlook] 1. Lumen Christi College - co-educational school on the site of Bishop Hervey's casino. 2. The Windmill - the stump of the building fought over during the 1689 siege. 3. St Columba's, Long Tower - the city's first Roman Catholic church. 4. Creggan Country Park - watersports and outdoor centre with some of the best views over the city. 5. Brandywell - home of soccer and Gaelic football. 6. The City Cemetery - a sacred, shared place . . . — Map (db m71004) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Walled City
If 'stones could speak', what a story they would have to tell. Their voices still echo on the walls and in the city streets. According to tradition St. Colm Cille chose the oak grove on top of the hill for his monastery in 546 AD. His community became a beacon of light and learning throughout Europe. Around it grew a settlement with a stronghold, cathedral and port. In 1610 the City of London Companies agreed to build a new city on the Foyle in return for land in King James I's . . . — Map (db m71026) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — The Walled City
If 'stones could speak', what a story they would have to tell. Their voices still echo on the walls and in the city streets. According to tradition St. Colm Cille chose the oak grove on top of the hill for his monastery in 546 AD. His community became a beacon of light and learning throughout Europe. Around it grew a settlement with a stronghold, cathedral and port. In 1610 the City of London Companies agreed to build a new city on the Foyle in return for land in King James I's . . . — Map (db m71121) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Verbal Arts Centre
The Former First Derry Primary School was established on the city walls as a Blue Coat School in 1773 and moved to this site in 1894. The (listed) building was purchased in 1996 and then renovated by the Verbal Arts Centre: it has been designed to provide Ireland's first home for the literary arts. The Centre offers a range of unique resources in its support of verbal creativity - library; children's storytelling theatre; debating chamber; exhibition, lecture and performance spaces; . . . — Map (db m70998) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Walker Memorial Pillar
This monument was erected to perpetuate the memory of the Rev. George Walker, who, aided by the garrison and brave inhabitants of this City, most gallantly defended it through a protracted siege, viz., from the 7th Dec. 1688 O.S. to the 12th of August following against an arbitrary and bigoted Monarch, heading an army of upwards of 20,000 men, many of whom were foreign mercenaries, and by such valiant conduct in numerous sorties, and by patiently enduring extreme privations and . . . — Map (db m70988) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — War Memorial
In memory of all those from and within the city and district who have lost their lives as a result of war and conflict In Memory of all those killed by weapon systems produced within this City & District — Map (db m70926) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — Water Bastion
Feabhail The river Foyle lapped against the Water Bastion until the late 18th century. The name Foyle probably arose because English-speaking settlers had difficulty saying the Irish 'Feabhail', used traditionally to describe the stretch of water from the sea to Strabane. Some say that it took its name from the legendary chieftain Feabhail who was drowned by a giant wave. The truth is simpler. The word comes from the Welsh for a 'lip', describing the shape of the estuary. Lundy's . . . — Map (db m71122) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Derry-Londonderry — World Wars Memorial
To Our Honoured Dead and Those Who Served 1914 - 1918 1939 - 1945 Names of the Fallen [Panels not transcribed] Sculptures by Vernon March, 1926 — Map (db m71133) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Garvagh — Welcome to Garvagh
The town of Garvagh owes its 17th century origins and subsequent development to the Canning family. George Canning was the first family member to come to Ireland when, in September 1614, he arrived at Agivey on the banks of the Bann as an agent for the Ironmongers' Company of London. He established the hamlet of Ballinameen to the south of the town in 1620, but this was destroyed during the 1641 rebellion. The hamlet was re-established in subsequent years and is still known as . . . — Map (db m70740) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Garvagh — Welcome to Garvagh
Side A Welcome to the historic town of Garvagh, situated on the banks of the Agivey River. We hope you enjoy your visit. Please use the information and maps on this sign to find out about the history of Garvagh and to discover its many attractions. The name Garvagh comes from an old Irish term meaning 'rough place'. The area around the town is steeped in history, and there are many intriguing relics from the past, such as old church ruins, ancient graves and stone circles. . . . — Map (db m70748) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Garvagh — World Wars Memorial
The Great War 1914 - 1918 "The Fallen" Faithful unto death Black H.C. • Bradley J. • Bradley P. • Caldwell, W. • Caskey M. • Collins R. • Dale T. • Dempsey J. • Faith J. • Gavin R. F. Capt. • Hall T. Cpl. • Hazlett J.B. • Lynch J. Cpl. • Macausland O.B. Lieut. • Maclean J.G. • McCooke J. • McCurdy W. • McElfatrick S. • McIlwrath M. L/C. • McIlrath R. L/C. • Morrison J.D. L/C. • Mulholland J. • O’Kane D. • O’Kane T. • Patton W. • Stewart W. • Thompson W.J. • Torrens J. • Torrens T. . . . — Map (db m70726) WM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Limavady — Jane Ross and "Danny Boy"1810 - 1879
It was in Limavady that the famous melody "Danny Boy" was noted down by Jane Ross from a tune played by a blind street fiddler named Jimmy McCurry Oh Dan-ny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling from glen to glen and down the mountain side... Map (db m70913) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Londonderry), Limavady — Limavady RailwayWelcome to the Backburn Path
In the early 1900s, Northern Ireland Railways were at their peak. They allowed fast and efficient transport of goods, mail and promoted local seaside resorts. They also established standard time. From the early 1920s, road and air transport began to replace the railways so that by the end of the 1950s the majority of our local lines had been closed. Rapid growth of the flax industry in the area led to an increasing demand for fast and efficient export of flax and linen to the large . . . — Map (db m70902) HM
United Kingdom, Northern Ireland (County Tyrone), Moy — World Wars Memorial
The Great War 1914-1918 In Memoriam Aird A. • Allen R. • Allen W. • Allen W.J. • Bradley F.E. • Bradley F.H. • Bradley R.I. • Carson R. • Carson W. • Coleman G. • Davies C.C. • Duke W. • Fullerton J. • Gray J. • Hagan T.J. • Harkin C. • Herron C. • Hetherington J.W. • Igoe H. • Jones R.J. • Kilpatrick W.R. • Lutton G. • Morrison J.D. • McGuigan H. • McGuigan J. • Proctor J.C.B. • Reid J. • Rose-Cleland A.M.B. • Stafford J. • Tottenham E.L. M.C. • Tottenham A.H. • Watson E. • . . . — Map (db m70725) WM
United Kingdom, Scotland, Stenness — Maes Howe
Maes Howe has been inscribed upon the World Heritage List of the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. Inscription on this List confirms the exceptional universal value of a cultural or natural site which deserves protection for the benefit of humanity. Maes Howe is an exceptionally early architectural masterpiece, expressing the genius of Neolithic peoples. Maes Howe along with three other properties in the care of Historic Scotland at Skara . . . — Map (db m76868) HM
United Kingdom, Staffordshire, Lichfield — Edward Wightman Memorial
Edward Wightman of Burton-on-Trent was burnt at the stake in this Market Place for heresy 11th April 1612 being the last person in England so to die. — Map (db m22661) HM
United Kingdom, Suffolk (Mid Suffolk), Botesdale — In Grateful Memory
In grateful Memory of those men from the parishes of Botesdale-Redgrave-Rickinghall Superior and Inferior who fell in The Great War 1914-1918 Also in affectionate memory of those who gave their lives in the 1939-45 War Peter Le M Andrew • Sidney C Bailey • William Doddington • Kenneth J Erith • Charles F Francis • Jasper F Caught • Edward Kirk • Edward C A Plarce • Ronald W Pearce • Gordon E Ray • John K Ray — Map (db m52451) HM
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