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Alberta Markers
Alberta, Athabasca — Athabasca Landing
This was once the "jumping off point" for the vast northland. Here in 1887 the first steamboat "Athabasca" was built to ply the river between Mirror Landing and Grand Rapids. Steamboats superceded the canoe, York boat, and scow, and were replaced themselves a few decades later by the railway. — Map (db m8837) HM
Alberta, Banff — Banff Park Museum
Opened in 1895, the Banff Park Museum was moved into this building in 1903. Its cross-log motif exemplifies an architectural style common in the town at the time. Norman Bethune Sanson, the museum’s curator from 1896 to 1932, energetically developed the collections, initially put together by the Geological Survey of Canada. Throughout its early years the museum dealt with natural and human history but by the late 1950s was limited to natural history. While this building was refurbished in 1985, . . . — Map (db m8836) HM
Alberta, Devon — Leduc-Woodbend Oil FieldLe Site Pétrolifière Leduc-Woodbend
The development of this field in 1947 marked a turning point in the history of the Alberta petroleum industry. After the drilling of Leduc No. 1, the geographical focus of the industry shifted from Turner Valley northward to the central plains area, where vast oil reserves were uncovered. Oil production, which has been in decline, expanded dramatically and the Edmonton area became a petrochemical and distributing centre. The boom in output enable Alberta to become, for the first time, a major . . . — Map (db m8856) HM
Alberta, Fort McMurray — Methye Portage
The earliest trade route between eastward and northward flowing waters followed the Clearwater River and the Methye Portage. Discovered by Peter Pond in 1778 and used continuously for more than a century for more than a century by fur-traders and explorers, including Sir Alexander Mackenzie, Sir John Franklin, and Sir George Simpson. — Map (db m8814) HM
Alberta, Glendon — The Pyrogy – PyrohyBest Made in Glendon
A European food that was brought to Western Canada in the early 19th century by the working and poor people. It originated as a boiled dumpling, and later people added whatever they desired inside, and it became a pyrogy – pyrohy, sometimes called varenyky. — Map (db m8813) HM
Alberta, Lake Louise — Canadian Pacific Railway Stone Monument
Erected in honor of Sir James Hector K. C. M. C. Geologist and explorer to the Palliser Expedition of 1857 - 1860 by his friends in Canada, the United States & England. One of the earliest scientists to explore the Canadian Rocky Mountains. He discovered the Kicking Horse Pass through which the Canadian Pacific Railway now runs from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean. — Map (db m70443) HM
Alberta, Lake Louise — Castle Mountain Internment Camp
During Canada’s first national internment operations in World War One, thousands of immigrants from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the majority of Ukrainian origin, some citizens of Canada, were imprisoned as “enemy aliens”. Internment operations lasted from 1914 to 1920. This plaque is in memory of those held at the Castle Mountain camp from 14 July 1915 to 15 July 1917. Camp D’Internement du Mont-Castle. Lors des premières operations nationale d’internement Durant la . . . — Map (db m8827) HM
Alberta, Lake Louise — Defining the Boundry of the Great DivideDélimitation de la Ligne de Partage des Eaux
Prior to 1913 the Alberta-British Columbia boundary was defined by the divide or watershed of the Rocky Mountains. The discovery of valuable coal deposits and the availability of marketable timber and the incursion of railroads and roads required a more precise demarcation. In 1913 provincial and federal Orders-in-Council approved a boundary survey between the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia and the appointment of Commissioners. In June of that year Edward Deville, Surveyor . . . — Map (db m70445) HM
Alberta, Lake Louise — Parting of the WatersLe Partage des Eaux
How many creeks do you know of that split, with each fork reaching a separate ocean, 4500 km apart.

Here, Divide Creek forks on the boundary between Pacific and Atlantic watersheds, commonly called the Great Divide.

Water in the left fork will flow into the Pacific Ocean. Water in the right fort will flow into the Atlantic Ocean. — Map (db m70444) HM
Alberta, Lake Louise — Storm MountainMont Storm
ENGLISH INSCRIPTION Mountains create their own weather As winds swirl around and rise above these massive barriers, clouds build up and bring the rain and snowstorms for which Storm Mountain was named. Travellers Converge in Valleys Vermilion Pass provides a vital low-elevation travel route through the mountains of the Continental Divide. Wild animals have long used these valley pathways to find seasonal food sources and new home ranges. People have . . . — Map (db m82917)
Alberta, Turner Valley — Turner Valley Gas Plant
This plant, which was critical to the development of the Turner Valley oil field, is the earliest gas processing facility built in Canada and the only survivor of its type. The present complex was begun in 1921 after a fire destroyed the original plant, built in 1914. The many modifications and additions made to it since the 1920s reflect the evolution of refining technology. The buildings. Machinery and equipment together illustrate the production process required to extract marketable gas and . . . — Map (db m8825) HM
Alberta, Turner Valley — Turner Valley Oilfield
Turner Valley is Alberta’s first great oilfield. Initially the field, which began production in 1914, yielded mainly natural gas. Local plants, which provided the only extensive gas-processing system in the province, extracted the marketable petroleum products. The discovery of deeper deposits in 1924 at Royalite No. 4 made Turner Valley the leading producer in Canada. In 1936, the crude-oil pool underlying the gas reserves was discovered and Turner Valley reached peak output. While production . . . — Map (db m9204) HM
Alberta, Waterton — Dream TownVille de Rêve
ENGLISH INSCRIPTION Western Canada’s first producing oil was drilled in this valley at the turn of the 20th century. This success spurred further activity in this area, attracting more drilling and workers. A.P. Patrick, an investor in the first well and a Dominion Land Surveyor, decided to create a community to support them. You are standing in the area he surveyed, then registered in 1908 as Oil City. His ambitious plan showed a main street and 450 fifty-foot lots . . . — Map (db m82965) HM
Alberta, Waterton — Oil & ArchitecturePétrole et Architecture
ENGLISH INSCRIPTION Did you know Waterton contains two national historic sites? Many more are nearby, some managed by Parks Canada and some by other agencies and groups. National historic sites celebrate over 1,500 places, persons and events important to Canadians. First Oil Well in Western Canada National Historic Site Oil was struck in Waterton’s Akamina Valley in 1902! As Western Canada’s first oil well producing saleable quantities of oil, it became a national . . . — Map (db m82964) HM
Alberta, Waterton — Waterton
ENGLISH INSCRIPTION Welcome to Waterton Lakes National Park of Canada National Parks protect the natural landscapes of Canada and also provide great places for outdoor adventures and connecting with nature. As you enjoy the park today, thank local rancher F.W. Godsal for your experience. He initiated conservation efforts by sending a letter to Ottawa in 1893 recommending that the area be set aside as a protected reserve. Protected in 1895, Waterton is Canada’s 4th . . . — Map (db m82962) HM
Alberta, Waterton — Western Canada's 1st Producing Oil Well1er Puits De Pétrole Producteur de L'ouest Canadien
ENGLISH INSCRIPTION (Panel 1) Bears Discover Oil?! Oil seeps in this area were well known to Aboriginal peoples, who may have found them while observing bears. Bears are attracted by the smell of oil and may roll in it to rid themselves of insects. Aboriginal peoples used oil as a medicine. Beginning in the 1870s the search was on for oil in western Canada. Drawing on Native lore, locals looked for oil seepages, and eventually found oil covered pools near . . . — Map (db m80302) HM
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