HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 
Show DirectionsOmit Marker TextClick to map all markers shown on this page.
Connecticut Markers
1269 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 1019
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — Bethel Railway Station - 1912
The above photo depicts Bethel’s second train station that was completed in 1899 and provided passenger service until 1996 when a new station was constructed further north along the line. Bethel’s original train station occupied this same spot from the time the Danbury & Norwalk Railroad began service in 1852 until the building was destroyed by fire in December of 1898. The station depicted above also once served the Shepaug Railroad that operated from 1872 until 1911. This line connected train . . . — Map (db m48431) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — Bethel Soldier’s Memorial
[ north face ] In Memory Of The Soldiers & Sailors Of Bethel Who Gave Their Lives In Defense Of The Union 1861 1865 [ south face ] Albert Woodruff   2nd Conn. Art. Adam Grimm   7th Conn. James Smith   7th Conn. Wm. H. Smith   7th Conn. John J. Lane   9th Conn. Nathan Keeler   10th Conn. Wm. H. Holley   12th Conn. Bethel S. Barnum   17th Conn. Theodore Blackman   17th Conn. Richard D. Taylor   17th Conn. Philo G. Roswell   20th . . . — Map (db m26819) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — Bethel World War I Monument
Erected By The Community Association Of Bethel In Honor Of Her War Veterans 1928 — Map (db m21233) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — In Memory of All Bethel Veterans
This monument is dedicated to the brave men and women of the town of Bethel who, in times of war and peace, have faithfully served their country. We honor and express gratitude for their courage and the sacrifices they made to keep America a free nation. The contributions of our veterans will never be forgotten. The preservation of peace and freedom for generations to come, rests not just with our veterans, but in the hands of out youth. Dedicated on the 21st of May 2000 — Map (db m21234) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — Phineas Taylor (P.T.) Barnum
Phineas Taylor (P.T.) Barnum Born Bethel, CT 1810 “I was born and reared in an atmosphere of merriment my natural bias was developed and strengthened by the associations of my youth; and I feel myself entitled to record the sayings and doings of the wags and eccentricities of Bethel because they partly explain the causes which have made me what I am.” Dedicated by the Bethel Historical Society on the 26th of September 2010 — Map (db m69926) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — Plumtrees Honor Roll
Plumtrees Honor Roll Parmly Brown • John E. Nelson • Leland Grumman Jr. Warren Abrams • Arthur Appell • George S Bates • Thomas Bergstrom • Arthur C. Brown • Raymond Capellaro • George Cher • Michael Cher • Stephen Cher • Richard Collier • William L. Collier • Emmet Crosier • Fred Eckert • Stanley Edmond • Evelyn Fallenback • Robert Flatow • Walter Flatow • Carl Gonzales • Edward Gonzales • Robert Gonzales • Amos Hawley • Charles Hawley • Franklyn Hawley • Arnold Hilton • Edward Hoyt • Walter . . . — Map (db m55005) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bethel — Plumtrees School
Plumtrees School The Plumtrees School was built in 1867 as a one room school house for the Plumtrees District of Bethel. The school served the community from 1867 through 1970. At its closing it was the last operating one room school house in America. The Plumtrees School now serves the community as an educational museum. • 1866:   Land was donated by Eliza Benedict for the School • 1866:   Plumtrees School was built. At this time Bethel had five school districts. Grades one through eight . . . — Map (db m55006) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bridgeport — Bridgeport Soldiers and Sailors Memorial
[ south plaque ] Dedicated To The Memory Of The Heroic Men Of Bridgeport, Who Fell In The Late War For The Preservation Of The Union. July, 1876 "It is for us the living to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion in that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, . . . — Map (db m27137) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bridgeport — Perry Memorial Arch
[Inscription on the street (east) side] This Memorial Arch was erected AD MCMXVIII to the memory of William Hunt Perry of Bridgeport Conn by his wife Harriet Adelaide Perry [Inscription on the park side] This Memorial Arch was erected by Harriet Adelaide Perry to the memory of her husband William Hunt Perry who was born May 25 1820 in West Woodstock Connecticut and died on May 9 1899 in the City of Bridgeport Connecticut where he resided for . . . — Map (db m27166) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bridgeport — Pro Patria
[ battle names on the banner at the top ] Fort Sumter • Vicksburg • Mobile Bay • Antietam • Gettysburg • Appomattox First Conn Cavalry Richard R Crawford   Lt D d Oct 30 1863 In Hospital Va Eugene W Starkweather   Corp L d Sept 30 1864 Andersonville Ga George W Clark   Pvt A d Aug 20 1864 Andersonville Ga Joseph Heaton   Pvt D d Dec 5 1864 Salisbury N C George Wagner   Pvt F d Dec 24 1864 Harper's Ferry Va Henry Kreger   Pvt K d Aug 24 1864 Washington D C John . . . — Map (db m27213) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bridgeport — Roberto Clemente
Roberto Clemente 1939 – 1973 The test of mankind's progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little. By: the 200,000 Spanish citizens of Conn. through the efforts of station WLVH – La Grande Jose Grimalt Mestre President — Map (db m27800) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bridgeport — Tom ThumbCharles S. Stratton
This monument is a memorial to Charles S. Stratton, a native of Bridgeport, who gained worldwide fame as Tom Thumb in the exhibitions of P.T. Barnum. The lifesize statue was erected before Tom Thumb's death on July 15, 1883. In 1959 vandals smashed the statue. It was restored by the Barnum Festival Society and Mountain Grove Cemetery Association with funds raised by public subscription. Nov. 19, 1961 [ inscription on the south face ] Stratton Sherwood E. Stratton . . . — Map (db m27168) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Bridgeport — U.S.S. Maine Memorial
In Memoriam U.S.S. Maine Destroyed in Havana Harbor February 15th 1898 This tablet is cast from metal recovered from the U.S.S. Maine — Map (db m27128) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Brookfield — Brookfield
Brookfield Parish of Newbury The land which comprises the geographical area of Brookfield belonged to the towns of Danbury, Newtown, and New Milford. In 1754 the Parish of Newbury was incorporated by decree of the General Assembly with boundaries and area similar to those of the town as it is today. In October, 1755 the Assembly approved as a site for the Newbury meeting house the location of the present Congregational Church. In 1788 the Parish of Newbury was incorporated as the Town of . . . — Map (db m35170) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Brookfield — Brookfield Veterans Monument
Dedicated to the Men and Women of Brookfield who Served in our Country’s Armed Service in Defense Of our Freedom — Map (db m21230) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Brookfield — First Settlement 1710
First Settlement 1710 Newbury Parish Incorporated 1754 Town of Brookfield Incorporated 1788 Pioneer Families Dunning • Peck • Hawley • Smith • Northrop • Ruggles • Dibble • Merwin • Baldwin • Blackmanstarr • Wheeler Presented By E.A. Rousman 1910 — Map (db m70962) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Cos Cob — Cos Cob
1640   1990 Cos Cob The name "Cos Cob Neck" was recorded in 1686. Six Cos Cob roads, including the present Orchard and Bible Streets, were laid out during 1689 northward from the Main Country Road (US 1) into "ye wilderness". A packet boat began to travel regularly between the Mianus River and New York City in 1700, carrying farm produce westward and returning with finished goods. David Bush constructed a tidal grist mill and dam at the mouth of Strickland Brook. On February 26, 1779, the . . . — Map (db m38750) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Cos Cob — Second Oldest Cemetery in Greenwich
The Second Oldest Cemetery in Greenwich Laid out by the Selectmen 1723 – 24 Historic Society Town of Greenwich 1982 — Map (db m38745) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Cos Cob — The Cos Cob Art Colony
The Cos Cob Art Colony During the early 1890s American impressionist artists John H. Twachtman and J. Alden Weir began teaching summer art classes here in Cos Cob to students of New York's Art Students League. Edward and Josephine Holley ran the Bush-Holley House, then known simply as the "Old House" or the Holley House, as a boarding house for the artists and writers who were attracted to the picturesque village of Cos Cob. The colonial architecture of the Holley House which had been built in . . . — Map (db m38747) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 27 — 19th & 20th Century Immigrants– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
the potato famine of 1846-1851 brought large numbers of Irish immigrants to town. Many purchased homes in the Town Hill neighborhood and St. Peter Church became a focal point for the community. Germans immigrants were the first major group to speak a foreign language in town. The majority worked as hatters. Immanuel Lutheran Church was founded in 1881 and in 1882 the church founded Danbury’s first parochial school. The first Italians arrived in the 1880s and were employed as work crews . . . — Map (db m71353) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 248 Main Street
About This Building 248 Main Street This handsome Victorian Romanesque building was built as the new headquarters for the Danbury National Bank in 1887. The architect, Warren Biggs of Bridgeport, used stone from Massachusetts. The building is constructed of Longmeadow brownstone with red Chicopee stone trim. All of the stone carving was done on the construction site and the name of the bank remains over the entrance. This is the only true brownstone building on Main Street. The . . . — Map (db m72859) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Black Soldiers Memorial
Dedicated to the Memory Of the Black Soldiers of Greater Danbury who Served in the 29th and 30th Regiments, Conn. Volunteer Infantry During the Civil War 1861 – 1865 [ Names inscribed on the back ] 29th Conn Infantry Pvt James Adams • + Cpl Charles Aray • Pvt William Armstrong • Pvt William Avery • Cpl Allen Banks • Pvt Willis Banks • Pvt Joseph Barker • Cpl James Brewster • + Pvt Elbert Brown • Pvt Jerome Brown • Pvt Thomas Burr • Pvt Henry Butler • Cpl . . . — Map (db m23052) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 5 — Charles Edward Ives – The Father of Modern Music– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Charles Edward Ives, the ‘Father of Modern Music,’ was born in Danbury on October 20, 1874 to a prominent New England family who were leading citizens of he community. His grandfather, George White Ives, founder of The Savings Bank of Danbury, was instrumental in bring the railroad to town and helped to establish Wooster Cemetery. Charles inherited his love of music from his father. George Edward Ives served as the youngest Union bandleader during the Civil War and became Charles’ most . . . — Map (db m71183) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 31 — Country Lanes & City Streets– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Many Danbury land records were destroyed during the British raid of 1777. Historic newspapers, old deeds and early maps help us piece together some of the earliest place names of our city. Parts of Danbury were lost to Bethel when it broke away in 1855 including Pinchgut, Wolfpits, and Puppytown. Other colorful names have simply disappeared over time such as Mashing Tub Swamp and Stubble-lot Road. The Borough of Danbury began to officially name its streets in 1846 and by 1878 Towne . . . — Map (db m71348) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury
Marker Front: Eight families came from Norwalk in 1685 to settle this area which the Indians called Pahquioque. They built their first homes a half mile south of here and made this green their common. The General Court in October 1687 decreed the name “Danbury” although the settlers had chosen “Swampfield.” Beans and other crops helped make Danbury an inland trading center by 1750 with a population of two thousand. At the start of the American Revolution this . . . — Map (db m22836) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 13 — Danbury – The Hat City– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Although local folklore credits a man by the name of Zadoc Benedict with the start of hatting in Danbury after the Revolutionary War, hatters are thought to have been at work in the Danbury community before that time. After the Revolutionary War, the hatting industry developed and flourished here due to a ready supply of natural resources. A great quantity of water was needed to make hats and Danbury built the reservoirs needed to hold water for the factories. The railroad created a . . . — Map (db m71237) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury 9-11 Memorial
Dedicated in loving memory to Connecticut victims of the terrorist attack on the United States September 11, 2001 Mayor Mark D. Boughton Danbury 9-11 Memorial Committee September 11, 2004 — Map (db m22833) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury Area Korean War Memorial
Korean War 1950 – 1953 to those who died Honor and Eternal Rest to those still missing Rememberance and Hope to those who returned Gratitude and Peace [Inscribed on the left panel] Danbury Richard Q. Braman PFC USMC KIA 22 Sep 1950 Lee R. Hartell 1st Lt USA KIA 27 Aug 1951 Medal of Honor Richard C. Newton Pfc USA KIA 22 Jul 1953 Donald J. Cunha Cpl USMC KIA 17 Sep 1951 Leonard C. Hull Cpl USA MIA 20 Jul 1950 Albert W. Plumb Pvt . . . — Map (db m23404) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury Area Vietnam War Memorial
1964 Vietnam War 1975 Dedicated this 29th day of May 1988 by the people of the greated Danbury area to those men and women who served their country during the Vietnam War. This memorial symbolizes the courage and sacrifices made by individuals as well as the humanity and compassion shown towards the people, and in particular, the children of the Republic of Vietnam. Bethel Harold F. Gentile, Cpl, USA KIA 6/24/68 Gary C. Griswold, PFC, USMC KIA 10/14/67 William B. Mitchell, PFC, . . . — Map (db m43312) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury City Hall Wall
Between 1886 and 1970 the Danbury City Hall was situated in the site of the present library courtyard. This wall, part of the original structure, stands as an enduring symbol preserving our City’s historic heritage. — Map (db m22790) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 9 — Danbury Disasters– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
When the Kohanza Reservoir Dam gave way on the night of February 20, 1869, sixty acres of water, ice, lumber and debris roared down north Main Street. It took shops, homes, bridges and factories with it and several lives were lost. A combination of heavy frost and a neglected earlier break were cited as the cause. Tropical storms in August and October of 1955 brought continuous, torrential downpours to the area. In October, the resulting flood paralyzed the city for days. Utilities were cut . . . — Map (db m72857) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 19 — Danbury During the Revolutionary War– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
On April 26, 1777, 2,000 British soldiers, under the command of General Tryon, marched into Danbury. The town was a supply depot for military stores. A Corps of Artificers; skilled craftsmen, such as blacksmiths, were formed into special military units and had camps in town, as well. These men provided the Continental Army and the Colonial Militia with items needed in camp or on the battlefield. A military hospital was also located here. General Wooster set out for Danbury after news . . . — Map (db m72558) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 10 — Danbury Fair Days– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The origins of the Danbury Fair began in 1821 when the Fairfield Agricultural Society held gatherings in Elmwood Park on Main Street. The event gave farmers an opportunity to discuss farming methods and showcase the fruits of their labor. Hat manufacturer Rundle & White organized The Danbury Farmers & Manufacturers Society in 1869. The new organization held its first fair in a “rough board, one-story building and small tent borrowed from the Barnum & Bailey Circus” on the site . . . — Map (db m71186) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 23 — Danbury Firsts– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
• First recorded census taken in 1756, Danbury’s population: 1,527. • Danbury’s first mayor, elected in 1888, was Lewis LeGrand Hopkins. • The first train arrived on the tracks of the Danbury & Norwalk Railroad on March 1, 1851. • Wakefield Dibble set up the town’s first grist mill on Beaver Brook in 1702. • Danbury’s first newspaper was The Farmer’s Journal published in 1790. • The first fire companies organize in 1829. The first engine was purchased in 1889 and the first . . . — Map (db m71346) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury Veterans Monument
Center Marker:In Honor of The Men and Women of Danbury who served in the World War 1917 – 1919 In Memory of these men who made the supreme sacrifice for liberty Toby Asmar Co. M. 325th Infantry Killed In Action October 11, 1918 Martin J. Brennan Headquarters Co. 138th Field Artillery Died in France October 26, 1918 George A. Byrnes Merchant Marine Service Died at Brookline, Mass. September 21, 1918 Joseph T. . . . — Map (db m23084) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 22 — Danbury Women of Note– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Throughout its history, countless women have contributed to Danbury and the lives of its citizens. Here are just a few that have left their mark on our community. Mary Bull (1812-1882) dedicated her life to attending the poor and needy of Danbury. In 1857, she founded The Danbury Children’s Home. Upon her death, the newspaper described her as a woman ‘whose worth none of us can fully measure’ and whose death was a ‘public misfortune.’ Dr. Sophia Penfield graduated from the Homeopathic . . . — Map (db m71247) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Danbury World War II Memorial
In Memory of All Danbury World War II Veterans This memorial is in honor of all of World War II Veterans who were involved in the fight for the freedom of America and the free world. Whether they fought in the Pacific or European theater, they face a resolute and often brutal enemy; yet they possessed the inner strength and courage that kept them going on the beaches at Normandy, in the deserts of North Africa and on the islands of the South Pacific. The actions of those who were . . . — Map (db m23398) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — David Wooster Monument
[ North face ] David Wooster First Maj. Gen. of the Conn. Troops in the Army of the Revolution. Brig. Gen. of the United Colonies. Born at Stratford, Mar. 2, 1710-11. Wounded at Ridgefield, April 27, 1777, while defending the liberties of America, and nobly died at Danbury, May 2, 1777. Of his country Wooster said, “My life has been ever devoted to her service from my youth up. Though never before in a cause like this – A cause for which I . . . — Map (db m23074) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 28 — Diversity in Danbury– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The start of the 20th century saw a continual influx of newcomers to Danbury. A religious census taken in 1916 showed that 27 nationalities and 20 creeds were represented among the 22,533 residents of the town. The 1910 census shows that a majority of the population were foreign born. The most numerous continued to be Italians. Their numbers increased until they outnumbered the Irish as the major foreign born group by the 1930s. For many immigrants, churches, schools and fraternal . . . — Map (db m71473) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 26 — Early Arrivals– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The first eight families arrived here in 1685; full of hope as they embarked on a new life filled with opportunity. Others soon joined them in this flourishing settlement in a newly born colony. Most of Danbury’s inhabitants, prior to the start of the American Revolution, were descendants of the first wave of puritan immigrants who came to Connecticut during the mid-1600s. Growing prosperity attracted a small steady stream of newcomers. On occasion, real “foreigners” . . . — Map (db m71352) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 17 — Elmwood Park– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
In 1801, Mr. Major Starr donated the land necessary to take a large curve out of Main Street on condition that it serve as a permanent common. To this end, residents from the southern end of the street raised their own funds and created Elmwood Park in 1853, planting the first elm trees and a hay crop. On Training Days, the park became the center for the Artillery and Cavalry Companies’ maneuvers and celebrations. It was the site of early fairs held by the Fairfield County Agricultural . . . — Map (db m71476) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 29 — Farming & Agriculture– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
During the colonial period, agriculture was the principal occupation in Danbury. The daily tasks of our early settlers included clearing land, raising cattle, growing wheat, rye, corn, beans and squash. Broad flat tracts of fertile ground in places like Miry Brook, Starrs Plain, Great Plain and Beaver Brook were among the first lands to be used for farming. As more land was put under cultivation to meet the needs of a growing population, farmers typically traveled four to seven miles . . . — Map (db m71351) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 34 — Higher Education– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Continuing educational opportunities have long been available in Danbury. In the late 1800s, the Stillman’s Business College, at the corner on Main and White Streets, offered classes in penmanship, commercial law and bookkeeping. The Danbury State Trade School opened in 1914 on Library Place. In 1955, an expansion and relocation to Hayestown Avenue renamed it the Henry Abbott Technical & Vocational School. A combination of academics and vocational training made it a unique addition to our . . . — Map (db m71136) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Historic SiteDanbury’s First Episcopal Church
Historic Site Danbury’s First Episcopal Church occupied this site from 1763 until 1884. In 1777, British troops, led by General Tryon, took military stores from the church and burned them in the nearby street, but spared the edifice. Three public schools have stood on this site. The third forms the older part of this school and was built in 1936. In 1947 the Episcopal graveyard, located between the school and the sidewalk was cleared of graves and markers, which were transferred to the . . . — Map (db m72562) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 32 — Industrial Strength Danbury– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The artificers, who produced and distributed goods for the army during the American Revolution, may have fueled the start of Danbury’s early manufacturing activities. During the years following the war, Danbury began its transition from a primarily agricultural economy to a regional industrial center. Turnpikes developed as supply routes during the war and water power from the Still River were important to the arrival of mills for producing flour, lumber, fulled woolen cloth and linseed . . . — Map (db m71474) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 30 — Inventions & Innovations– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Over 300 patents were issued to residents of Danbury between 1800 and 1890, one of the earliest was issued to D. Hoyt in 1838 for a door hinge. Many inventions can be attributed to progress and practical conveniences including an oven, a clothes wringer, and a refrigerator. Patents were also issued for items such as a banjo, a billiard cue tip, moccasins, a pedicycle and a soda water apparatus. Two local women are also among those given to 19th century inventions. In 1872, Elizabeth . . . — Map (db m71350) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — John W. Leahy
John W. Leahy 1895 – 1975 A showman whose genuine love and understanding of people endeared him to the hearts of young and old alike. By his personal warmth, imagination, and drive, he built the Danbury State Fair into a nationally known attraction. Placed by Fair Concessionaires, The S.N.Y.R.A., and Many Friends — Map (db m72861) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 2 — Kenosia & Candlewood– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Lake Kenosia, said to originate from a Native American word meaning pike or pickerel, is part of the Still River waterway. This popular local park has always played an historic role as a recreational gathering place for Danbury residents. In his book, The History of Danbury 1684-1896, James M. Bailey wrote, “Lake Kenosia, now a popular summer resort for the people of Danbury was known in the old days as Mill Plain Pond. Many of the older residents can remember boating upon the . . . — Map (db m71239) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 12 — Marian Anderson– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Marian Anderson was orn in Philadelphia on February 27, 1897. Although her early musical training was sporadic, a scholarship enabled her to study abroad under distinguished teachers. When Arturo Tosacnini heard her perform at the Salzburg festival in 1935, the maestro was so impressed that he said to her: “A voice like yours is heard only once in a hundred years.” After gaining international prominence, she returned to America. When she lost the opportunity to perform in . . . — Map (db m71188) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Monument to Soldiers in Unknown Graves
[ Front ] In Memoriam Danbury’s Memorial To Her Soldiers and Sailors Who Rest on Unknown Graves [ Left column ] William Pendley Co. L 1st Ct. Cav. Eli W. Stevens Co. L 1st Ct. Cav. William R. Potter Co. B 1st Ct. H.A. Thomas G. Sherman Co. B 1st Ct. H.A. D.B. DeForest Co. D 1st Ct. H.A. James Kane Co. E 1st Ct. H.A. F.M. Richardson Co. M 1st Ct. H.A. Thomas Hyer Co. B 2nd Ct. H.A. E.W. Converse Co. D 2nd Ct. H.A. John R. . . . — Map (db m23051) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 25 — Monumental Moments– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
There are monuments located throughout our city that serve as a reminder of those who have served our country. The dedication of the Civil War Soldier’s Monument took place on May 27, 1880 in City Hall Square. The 32-foot high granite monument stands at the intersection of Main and West Streets. Its inscription reads: “To our Brothers, Beloved, Honored, Revered, Who Died That Our Country Might Live.” It was a project accomplished mainly by the women of Danbury. In . . . — Map (db m71246) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 21 — Old City Center Square– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
City Hall Square, the intersection of Main and White Streets has been a central focal point for public activities and structures since the late eighteenth century. In the 1880s it became the center of Danbury public life. The old City Hall, that stood where the Danbury Public Library is now located, took two years to build and was completed in 1886. It housed the offices of elected officials, the Police Department and the City jail. An open portico on the West Street side was a spot where . . . — Map (db m71243) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Oldest Cemetery 1684
Oldest Cemetery 1684 Danbury Erected by Mary Wooster Chapter N.S.D.A.R. — Map (db m23050) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 3 — Savings Bank of Danbury at Bankers’ Row– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
An important aspect of Danbury’s growth as a regional center was the proliferation of banks. The Savings Bank of Danbury began conducting business in 1849 when George W. Ives set up shop in the Ives homestead on Main Street. As noted by James M. Bailey in his book, The History of Danbury, “A desk in the dining room was the safe and in the absence of the Treasurer, Mrs. Ives received deposits and attended to the business of the bank.” In 1852.Ives built a small . . . — Map (db m71138) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 16 — Schools and Education– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Since its earliest days, the importance of education has been at the forefront of the development of the community. In 1763 the will of Comfort Starr left 800 pounds “for the support of a perpetual school in the centre of town.” By 1769, a School Committee was administering the Starr Fund and had divided the area into school districts. Committeemen were appointed to oversee the schools in each district: Beaver brook, Great Plain, Stony Hill, Pembroke, King St., Boggs, Mill . . . — Map (db m71477) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Soldiers and Sailors Memorial
[ Inscribed around the bronze base ] Dedicated to the Soldiers and Sailors of Danbury 1776 1861 1898 1917 Donald E. Curran SC Map (db m22785) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Sybil Ludington
Sybil Ludington On April 26, 1777 this brave sixteen year-old girl rode through the enemy-infested countryside for thirty miles in Putnam County, New York, to warn the local militia that British troops were attacking and plundering Danbury, Connecticut. Donated by Anna Hyatt Huntington — Map (db m25374) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 33 — The Circus Comes to Town– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Danbury was home to several early pioneers of the American circus in the mid 1800s. In fact, Aaron Turner, proprietor of one of the earliest American traveling shows, was actually P.T. Barnum’s mentor. From 1836 to 1838, Barnum traveled with Aaron Turner’s wagon circus and worked as a ticket seller. Turner’s Columbian Circus consisted of trick horseback riding, tumbling and clown acts. He is also noted as the first to erect a canvas tent for performances. At only 50 feet in diameter, . . . — Map (db m71475) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 18 — The Danbury Court House– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
Danbury’s first courthouse was built in 1785; complete with old stocks and whipping posts near the front entrance. These were dispensed with when the city’s second courthouse was built in 1824. Civic events and elections were held in the courthouse and it was also iused for the display of handcrafted goods during agricultural fairs held in nearby Elmwood Park. In September of 1848, General Tom Thumb visited Danbury with his employer P.T. Barnum. His exhibition was held at the Court House . . . — Map (db m72557) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 11 — The Danbury Fire Department– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The first reference to a fire department in Danbury can be found in The Republican Journal newspaper printed on November 11, 1793 announcing, “A subscription has been set forward in this town for the purpose of procuring a Fire Engine.” In 1824 the borough of Danbury appointed its first fire inspectors and five years later a tax was levied to buy two fire engines that led to the formation of the first two fire companies. The building of the Kohanza reservoirs in 1860 . . . — Map (db m71137) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 20 — The Danbury Public Library– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
In 1771, the Reverend Ebenezer Baldwin drew up terms for a subscription library that would be free to all denominations. Between 1793 and 1856, several other libraries were formed and disbanded. In 1869 the present Danbury Library was incorporated. William A. White of Brooklyn left a sum of $10,000 to establish a public library in his native borough of Danbury. The following year, his brother Alexander M. White donated funds, property and his birthplace on Main Street for use until a . . . — Map (db m71244) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — The Danbury Raid
The revolutionary village which centered about this green with its stores of supplies for the army was sacked and burned by a force of two thousand British April 26, 1777 Warned of the gathering militia the raiders departed next morning in haste but were attacked and harassed by the rising colonials and driven to the shelter of their boats on the sound They kindled a fire that blazed at Saratoga — Map (db m23542) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 7 — The News Around Town– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The first newspaper printed in Danbury was called The Farmer’s Journal and the year was 1790. By 1837, The Danbury Times was churning out a weekly paper on a small wooden press that printed one side of a page at a time. During the Civil War, James Montgomery Bailey, a Danbury native and Union War soldier, was hired to send back dispatches for publication. Upon his return to Danbury in 1865, Bailey and fellow soldier Timothy Donovan, a printer by trade, bought The Danbury . . . — Map (db m71135) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 4 — The Seal of the City– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
On April 19, 1889, Governor Morgan Bulkley signed a document granting Danbury official designation as a City within the State of Connecticut. Plans were immediately underway to create a city seal. Committee member Henry Hoyt was assigned the task. He drew inspiration from many events and symbols of Danbury history and incorporated them into his design. Two central elements of the design refer to the British Raid on Danbury that occurred on April 26, 1777. The motto, on the diagonal . . . — Map (db m71181) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 1 — The Settling of Danbury– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
In the spring of the year 1685, the first permanent settlement of Danbury was made. The eight determined families of Samuel Benedict, James Benedict, Thomas Barnum, Judah Gregory, Thomas Taylor, John Hoyt, Francis Bushnell and James Beebe settled near the Still River between two hills, now known as Town Hill on the east and Deer Hill on the west. Forty-eight square miles of land, in an area called “Pahquioque,” meaning “open plain,” was purchased for “30 . . . — Map (db m71240) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 24 — The Sporting Life– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
historic newspapers reveal that sports have long been an outlet for both competitive and recreational gatherings in our city. Local coverage of amateur, club, factory, and school competitions were a regular feature. Early baseball games were held at White Street fields. In 1913, an 1,800 seat stadium was built at the corner of South Street and Shelter Rock Road next to the trolley depot. Admission was 25 cents. For five cents more, fans could sit in the grandstand. During the late . . . — Map (db m71245) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — To Our BrothersDefenders of The Union
(front) To Our Brothers, Beloved, Honored, Revered Who Died That Our Country Might Live (back)The Defenders of The Union (Inscribed around the column) Bull Run • Wilderness • Antietam • Fredericksburg • Gettysburg • Chancellorsville • Appomattax • Petersburg • Port Hudson — Map (db m22788) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 6 — Trains, Trolleys & Transportation– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
On March 1, 1852, the first train on the tracks of the Danbury & Norwalk Railroad pulled into the Main Street depot, located on the site of the present Post Office. The venture consisted of three locomotives, six passenger cars, twenty-four freight cars and three handcars. With two trains arriving daily, connecting to points north and south, it brought with it the means for the city to become a viable economic powerhouse in the region. The hatting industry flourished as goods were more . . . — Map (db m71184) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Earl Cornwallis and the British army in . . . — Map (db m72560) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Danbury — 8 — Wooster Square– The Museum in the Streets – — Danbury, Connecticut
The intersection of Main Street with White and Elm Streets, known as Wooster Square became an increasingly important section of town with the completion of the Danbury and Norwalk Railroad depot on Main Street in 1851. As the main route through Danbury expanded over time, taverns, businesses, private residences, and the Sandemanian Church, were located in the surrounding area. The spot became the hub for many of Danbury’s landmark businesses. Gathering places occupied all four corners. . . . — Map (db m72855) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — A Calf Pasture Primer
Norwalk’s first European settlers grazed their cattle on this property – hence the name “Calf Pasture.” Among these earliest arrivals was Matthew Marvin, who moved to Norwalk in 1651 (the year the town was founded). His son, Matthew Jr., bought a parcel between the Norwalk and “Saketuck” rivers from the native Americans in 1669. Seven generations later, in December 1836, William and Amanda Marvin settled into a 19-room farmhouse on the family property. William . . . — Map (db m53465) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — Harvesting from the Sea
Year-round at Calf Pasture, you’ll see people reaping the bounty that Long Island Sound provides. You can participate too, but be sure to first obtain the required permits and then obey all applicable requirements and restrictions. These measures are in place to help ensure safe and undepleted harvests. Fishing For folks without boats, the Calf Pasture pier (and, at low tide, the park’s sand bars) are among the most popular fishing spots in the city. Anglers cast for striped bass, . . . — Map (db m53470) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — Lifeguarding History
By the late 1800s, swimming (or “bathing” as it was known as then) had become an extremely popular recreational activity in America. In the 1910s, the American Red Cross and Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) responded to the alarming number of drownings nationwide by beginning to organize, train and equip men specifically for water rescues. They were called “lifeguards.” Norwalk’s first lifeguard corps was formed by a group of men, including brothers Louis, John . . . — Map (db m53471) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — Roger Ludlow
This stone, erected December, 1895, commemorates the purchase from the aboriginal inhabitants, made February 26, 1640-1, by Roger Ludlow, Deputy-Governor of the Colony of Connecticut, framer of its first Code of Laws, and Founder of Norwalk, of “All the lands, meadows, pasturinge, trees, whatsoever there is, and grounds betweene the twoe rivers, the one called Norwalke, the other Soakatuck, to the middle of sayed rivers, from the sea a days walke into the country.” — Map (db m53440) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — Taylor Farm Park
This 30-acre open space is what remains of the former Marvin-Taylor farm property, a spread that once was called “one of the fairest domains in Southern New England.” Descendants of one of Norwalk’s earliest residents, Matthew Marvin, first bought 10 acres here in 1790. William Marvin moved into a new 19-room farmhouse in December 1836 and gradually bought more adjacent land. (The house was where Marvin Elementary School stands today.) In 1968, William Marvin’s great-grandsons, . . . — Map (db m53466) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — The British Invasion
In early July 1779, British General William Tryon led 2,600 British and Hessian soldiers on raids down the Connecticut shoreline to punish residents for their “ungenerous and wanton insurrection” against the Crown. They destroyed homes, provisions and ammunition in New Haven and Fairfield before landing at Norwalk Harbor and what is now Calf Pasture Beach on July 10. The next morning, Hessians and loyalists attacked on the Norwalk River’s west side, while Tyron’s British regiments . . . — Map (db m53442) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), East Norwalk — The Marvin Property
Marvin Elementary School stands on the site of the former homestead of the Marvin-Taylor family, who lived in the 19-room farmhouse for more than 130 years. William Marvin, an ancestor of one of Norwalk’s earliest settlers, built the house in 1836 and gradually bought adjacent property until he owned “one of the fairest domains in Southern New England.” This farm property included much of the area from here south to Calf Pasture Beach and west to the Norwalk harbor. In 1968, . . . — Map (db m53468) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Easton — Easton
[ front ] Easton North Fairfield, a part of the town of Fairfield, was purchased from the Aspetuck Indians in 1670 for thirty pounds and an amount of trucking cloth. In 1762 the Connecticut General Assembly established the parish of North Fairfield. The Legislature in 1787 combined the parishes of North Fairfield and Norfield into the town of Weston. In 1845 the former parish of North Fairfield was divided from Weston and became Easton. It is still governed by the town meeting. . . . — Map (db m30939) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Easton — Easton Remembers
1914   1919 Easton Remembers The Great War These Served Dr. C. Lincoln Banks • Frank G. Davis • Howard Elderd • Marna W. Gilbert • Carlton, Gordon • Victor E. Gustafson • Andrew Jaros • John G. Keller • Joseph H. Keller • Daniel Klein • Fred Knight • Josef Lastovica • Charles H. Logan • John E. Logan • Joseph A. Lucas • Herbert Mills • E. Perkins Nichols • Richard O'Donnell • William O'Donnell • Benjamin F. Parker • Frank Parker • George Parker • George L. Pearson • Harold Robinson • . . . — Map (db m30943) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Easton — Easton World War II & Korean War Monument
Lest We Forget In Memory Of The Easton Veterans Of World War II And Korea Albers, Jack • Allen, G.I. • Allison, Robert • Anton, Richard • Anton, Robert C. • Baksay, John Jr. • Ballantyne, Arthur S. • Ballantyne, James R. • Barbieri, Frank E. • Bartosik, Edmund W. • Bartosik, Felix B. • Bartosik, Vernon • * Beausoliel, Bernard • Bechtel, Elliott H. • Belko, Ronald J. • Bellassi, Salvatore • Beno, George A. • Benton, Philip E. • Besse, Elmer • Bibbins, Winthrop • Bilash, Edward W. • . . . — Map (db m30941) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Andrew Roland House
Built By Andrew Roland And His Wife Elizabeth Daughter of Governor Fitch 1760 Their Son Saw the British Land And Gave the Alarm — Map (db m65124) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Andrew Ward Memorial
In memory of Andrew Ward Born in England 1597 One of the founders of Wethersfield and Stamford ——— An honored citizen of Fairfield Conn. where he died in 1659 ——— Member of a Commission graunted to sev'al p'sons to governe the people att Conecticott by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay under John Winthrop Jr. Governor, 1635 – 1636 Erected by the Association of Descendants of Andrew Ward 1907 — Map (db m27172) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Burr Homestead
Home Of Thaddeus And Eunice Dennie Burr Here Dorothy Quincy and John Hancock President Of The Continental Congress Were Married in 1775 Burned By British in 1779 Rebuilt in 1790 — Map (db m27371) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — David Ogden House
This Dwelling Erected Prior to 1750 Is a Gift to The Fairfield Historical Society from Lillian Wadsworth In Memory of Her Husband Dudley Leland Wadsworth In whom the vision and self-reliance of The early settlers lived again — Map (db m27419) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Dr. Hosea Hurlburt House
Home Of Dr. Hosea Hurlburt 1753 Surgeon in Connecticut Continental Line — Map (db m27565) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield
Marker front: In 1639 Roger Ludlow and five companions, after serving in the Pequot War, purchased from the Indians a rich and abundant expanse of land which they called by the Indian name "Uncowaye." Shortly thereafter the name "Fairfield" replaced "Uncowaye." Originally this land consisted of present-day Fairfield, Greens Farms, Weston, Redding, Easton, and the western section of Bridgeport. The following years brought rapid development, and Fairfield with its fine harbors became . . . — Map (db m27176) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Boulder
This boulder commemorates the settlement of Fairfield by Roger Ludlow in 1639 and the burning of the Town by the British July 8, 1779. From the founding of the Town the religious, military and civic life of the people has centered around this Green — Map (db m27227) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Honor Roll
. . . — Map (db m27370) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Revolutionary War Memorial
1775   1783 In everlasting memory of the Patriots and Soldiers of Fairfield who served in the War of the American Revolution ——— Erected by the Eunice Dennie Burr Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution A.D. 1904 — Map (db m27171) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Sons Memorial
In Grateful Loving Memory Of All Fairfield Sons Who Have Laid Down Their Lives For Our Country World War I World War II Korea Vietnam Dedicated Nov. 11, 1988 Southport, Conn. — Map (db m27151) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Fairfield Vietnam War Memorial
This Memorial is hereby dedicated to the men and women who honorably served in the Armed Forces of the United States of America during the Vietnam War December 22, 1961 – May 7, 1975 May their sacrifices for human rights never be forgotten — Map (db m27229) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — George Hull Home Lot
Site Of Original Home Lot Of George Hull 1590 – 1659 Farmer, Trader Judge, Surveyor And Legislator — Map (db m27373) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Isaac Tucker House
Built By Isaac Tucker -- 1766 – Left standing when the British burned Fairfield — Map (db m27158) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — John J. Sullivan(1906 – 1997)
This building is renamed and dedicated in honor and memory of Fairfield's first Selectman John J. Sullivan (1906 – 1997) Who spent 24 years (1959 – 1983) as town leader. Our town was his life. He lived his values, respected the dignity of others and promulgated programs that strengthened the community he held so dear. Through his foresight and tireless efforts, Fairfield became the symbol of open space preservation in Connecticut. We proudly remember his . . . — Map (db m27225) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Jonathan Sturges Cottage
Jonathan Sturges Cottage Built 1840 Has Been Designated A National Historic Landmark This Building Possesses National Significance In Commemorating the History of The United States of America 1994 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m27375) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Men of Greenfield Hill
In Memory Of The Men Of Greenfield Hill Who Fought In The American Revolution John Alvord • Benjamin Banks 4th • Daniel Banks • David Banks • Ebenezer Banks Esq. • Ebenezer Banks • Elijah Banks • Eliphalet Banks • Gershom Banks • Gershom Banks Jr. • Hyatt Banks • Isaac Banks • Jesse Banks • John Banks • Jonathan Banks • Joseph Banks • Nathan Banks • Nehemiah Banks • Nehemiah Banks Jr. • Moses Betts • Elisha Bradley • Hezekiah Bradley • Hezekiah Bradley Jr. • John Bradley • Joseph Bradley . . . — Map (db m27420) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Moorlandsc. 1836
Former site of the Buckley Tavern, c.1750 — Map (db m27157) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Nathan Bulkley House
Built 1750 By Nathan Bulkley Pre-Revolutionary Spared By British When Town Was Burned — Map (db m27153) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Pequot Swamp Fountain
1637 This Fountain Commemorates The Valor And Victory Of The Colonist Forefathers At Pequot Swamp [ on the west side ] 1903 Erected By Dorothy Ripley Chapter D. A. R. And Friends — Map (db m27377) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Reverend John Jones Memorial
In memory of Revd John Jones AB   MA The Revd John Jones was born in Southampton England in 1595 and was a graduate of Queens College Cambridge A Puritan divine of the Church of England he was the first pastor of the First Church of Christ in Fairfield which he faithfully served from 1644 until his death in 1664 "A Valiant Leader of Christ's Soldiers A Holy Man of God" — Map (db m27174) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Roger Ludlow
Roger Ludlow Father of Connecticut, Author of the Fundamental Orders, Compiler of the Code of 1650, and Pioneer in the Development of American Constitutional Law. Founded Fairfield and Made His Home Here from 1639 to 1654 Erected 1939 — Map (db m27141) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Site of "Verna"
Site of "Verna" Home of Timothy Dwight Chaplain in Continental Army Pastor of Greenfield Founder of Academy Poet of "Greenfield Hill" President of Yale 1795 - 1815 — Map (db m27421) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Site of Old Tavern of Greenfield
Site of Old Tavern Of Greenfield 1792 – 1812 At the Sign of The Black Horse Here Rufus Putnam, Tallyrand, Don Juadenes, Rufus King, Joel Barlow and Tapping Reeve Were Guests — Map (db m27563) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Site of Trinity Church
Site Of Trinity Church 1790 – 1844 Rev. Philo Shelton Rector For Forty Years First To Be Ordained By First American Bishop Samuel Seabury — Map (db m27376) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Southport Wharves
From The Wharves Of Southport Went Out Men Who Fought Under John Paul Jones Isaac Hull And John Barry — Map (db m27147) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Thomas Sherwood Memorial
In memory of Thomas Sherwood 1586 – 1655 Puritan – Pioneer – Ancestor A founder of New England A first settler of Fairfield Deputy to the General Court Committeeman Soldier of the Pequot War and his wives Alice Seabrooke   1587 – 1639 Mary Fitch   1619 – 1693 — Map (db m27173) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Fairfield — Up This Road
Up this road 2600 British Troops marched July 7th 1779 under command of General Tyron and burned Fairfield — Map (db m27155) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Byram Veterans Memorial
In Memoriam Dedicated To The Honor And Sacrifice Of The Men And Women Of Byram Who Served In The Armed Forces In Defense Of Our Country Erected by the People of Byram 1953 — Map (db m38728) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Founders and Proprietors Monument1640 - 1935
In memory of the courageous men who founded the first settlement of the Town of Greenwich in the Connecticut Colony July 18-1640 Everardus Bogardus • John Bowers • Robert Feaks • Jeffre Ferris • Angell Husted • Robert Husted • Andrew Messenger • Daniel Patrick • Robert Williams • John Winkelman 27 Proprieters of 1672 John Asten • John Bowers • Walter Butler • Thomas Close • James Ferris • Joseph Ferris • Joseph Finch • Angell Husted • William . . . — Map (db m18669) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — George Washington Paused Here
George Washington Paused here on the Post Road near this church, on October 16, 1789 and afterward wrote in his diary, "the superb landscape which is to be seen from the meeting house is a rich regalia". In Commemoration Of this historic incident, this tablet has been placed here by friends in this church, October 16, 1932, in this Washington Bicentennial Year. — Map (db m38428) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Greenwich Ninth District Veterans Memorial
Erected In Memory Of The Men From The Ninth District Greenwich, Connecticut Who Served In The Armed Forces And Paid The Supreme Sacrifice For Their Country Anthony J. Balco • Joseph T. Borowiec • Domenico S. Crucitti • Harold A. Granholm • John T. Gzeckowicz • Volta Karlicek • Chester H. Arthur • Alfred Dickens • Oliver R. Foss Jr. • John L. Lord • Stanley Marciniak • Benjamin T. Neilson • Herbert C. Stover • Joseph P. Tiriolo • John F. Wlasuk • Harry R. Lambertson • Raymond C. . . . — Map (db m38713) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Greenwich Veterans Monument
In Reverent Memory Of Those Men From The Town of Greenwich Who Made The Supreme Sacrifice World War II Korea Vietnam [ flagpole base in front ] World War II Adams, John P. Jr. • Anderson, Leslie B. • Arthur, Chester H. • Aten, Courtenay N. Jr. • Attwell, Adrian G. Jr. • Austin, Frederick S. • Bacha, John • Backus, Alpheus P. • Badger, Paul B. Jr. • Balcerak, Henry F. • Balco, Anthony J. • Balin, Edward L. • Barker, John H. • Bartolo, Anthony J. • Becherer, Harry P. • . . . — Map (db m38425) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Greenwich World War I Memorial
[ south side ] In Honor of The Men and Women Of Greenwich Who Served In The World War [ east side ] In Memory Of Those Who Died And an Inspiration To All Who Follow [ west side ] Second Battle Of The Marne North Sea St. Mihiel Ypres Lys Meuse Argonne Verdun — Map (db m38427) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Old Greenwich Yacht Club
On July 18, 1640, Daniel Patrick and Robert Feaks landed on these shores in the name of the New Haven Colony to start a new settlement, later called Greenwich. This neck of land is called Elizabeth’s Neck after Mrs. Feaks. The anchor above this tablet was given to the Club by Clyde B. Ford, a founder. It was taken from the Thames-Sugar boat which sank by the point in April 1930. — Map (db m2048) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Putnam Cottage
Putnam Cottage From Here George. Putnam Escaped the British By His Famous Ride Down "Put's Hill" — Map (db m38606) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Putnam's Escape
This Marks The Spot Where On February 26, 1779 General Israel Putnam, Cut Off From His Soldiers And Pursued By British Cavalry, Galloped Down This Rocky Steep And Escaped, Daring To Lead Where Not One Of Many Hundred Foes Dared To Follow. Erected By The Putnam Hill Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Of Greenwich, Conn. A.D. 1900 — Map (db m38607) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Raynal C. Bolling
[ front ] Bolling [ back ] Raynal C. Bolling Born September 1, 1877 Foresaw His Nation's Call to Arms And Left a Brilliant Career To Prepare Himself for Service In the World War Colonel of Aviation American Expeditionary Forces He Laid the Foundation For Our Aerial Warfare in France He Fell In Action Near Amiens March 26, 1918 In the Vanguard Of the Thousands of Americans Who Gave All for Their Country — Map (db m38426) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument
Greenwich. To her loyal sons who fought for the Union, 1861-1865. — Map (db m37440) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Greenwich — The Old Burying Ground — At Byram Shore
The Old Burying Ground At Byram Shore Is Recognized For Its Historic Importance By The Historical Society Of the Town of Greenwich and The Byram Garden Club May 1999 Greenwich Landmark — Map (db m38732) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Barton L. Weller
May 27, 1991 This gazebo is presented to the citizens of Monroe by the Weller Foundation, Incorporated in memory of Barton L. Weller (1916 – 1990) Mr. Weller, founder of Vitramon, Incorporated and the Weller Foundation, was a long time supporter of area organizations, students and the community through his personal involvement and generous donations. Board of Trustees Alexander Fraser • Brian E. Skinner • Louis J. LaCroce • Michael J. Smith • Michael P. . . . — Map (db m26097) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Birdsey’s Plain / Stepney Cemetery
Stepney 1794 Birdsey’s Plain / Stepney Cemetery Noah and James Burr, Jr. donated this land for a burial ground. Over 1,400 men, women & children are interred including many of the areas first settlers. Veterans include: Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, WWI & II, Korea & Vietnam. The oldest surviving tombstone is that of Nathaniel W. Knapp, (1797) — Map (db m25329) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Birdsey’s Plain Methodist Church
[ South side ] Stepney 1839 Birdsey’s Plain Methodist Church (Our Lady of the Rosary Chapel) This Greek Revival-style church, one of the “twin” churches on the Stepney Green, was built by Hanford Hull. This was the second Methodist Church in Monroe. In 1973, the church was closed and sold to the orthodox Roman Catholic movement where the traditional Latin Mass is celebrated. Stepney Heritage Trail [ North side ] Stepney 1836 . . . — Map (db m25331) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Birdsey’s Plain Stepney Baptist Church
[ North side ] Stepney 1848 Birdsey’s Plain Stepney Baptist Church This two-story Greek Revival-style church was built under the direction of Hanford Hull, a noted joiner. The congregation was formed by the unification of the Stepney Baptist & the Monroe Baptist Societies. It was identical to the Methodist Church across the Stepney Green. Stepney Heritage Trail – The Sippin Family [ South side ] Stepney Ca 1845 Birdsey’s Plain . . . — Map (db m25340) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Bridgeport / Newtown Turnpike
Stepney 1801 Bridgeport / Newtown Turnpike The forerunner of CT Route 25. Five toll stations were located along this road. Travelers would be stopped by a pole or “pike” across the road attached to a base. Upon paying a few cents toll the attendant would turn the pike allowing the travellers to continue, thus the name “turnpike.” This turnpike was a catalyst for Stepney’s commercial growth & for moving goods from Bridgeport to Danbury. Stepney Heritage . . . — Map (db m25342) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Burr Hawley & Burritt General Store
Stepney ca 1855 Site of the Burr Hawley & Burritt General Store At this site farmers assembled horse teams & wagons to bring milk to the milk station & to buy feed, hay and grain; residents purchased sewing supplies, groceries & lumber. Tradition has it that Mark Twain of Redding, visited here to listen to local tales around the potbelly stove. The only motor-driven grain mill in town was located in the back of the store. Stepney Heritage Trail – The Sippin Family — Map (db m25338) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Monroe
[ front ] Monroe On May 23, 1823 the General Assembly granted the incorporation of this town and named it in honor of the then President, James Monroe. The town’s roots, however, are much deeper as it was an offspring of the mother-town of Stratford settled in 1639. About 1720, descendants of Stratford’s early proprietors, farmers and millers, claimed a share of this North Division and brought their families to new homesites here. To determine their religious and educational . . . — Map (db m26096) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Monroe Korean War Memorial
In Honor Of All Those Men And Women Who Proudly Served Their Country During the Korean War June 25, 1950 --- July 27, 1953 From Monroe Died in Battle Master Sgt Ray C. Bailey U.S. Army Oct 19, 1952 Wounded in Battle Corp. Albert J. Arsenian U.S. Army Sgt. Rudolph C. Wrabel Jr. U.S. Marines Dedicated Nov 11, 1985 By the Town of Monroe — Map (db m26093) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Monroe Veterans Memorial
[ Left column] To All Of Those Veterans From The Town of Monroe Who Served Their Country: Honor, Hope, Remembrance, Gratitude, Peace And Eternal Rest [ Right column] Those Who Have Made the Supreme Sacrifice Revolutionary War 1775 – 1783 War of 1812 1812 – 1815 Civil War 1861 – 1865 World War I 1917 – 1918 World War II 1941 – 1945 Victor Sippin David P. Winspur . . . — Map (db m26095) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Monroe World War I Memorial
In grateful recognition of the valor and devotion of the young men of this community who served in the World War for liberty and justice 1914 – 1919 Adams Fred Leroy • Anderlot William • Bachman George • Beardsley L Ben • Beardsley Ray M • Bevens Howard • Blakeman Philip S • Crouch William • Fohrenbach Fred W • Fohrenbach Henry • Fuller Leonard * • Jacot Herman • Judson Frank L • Levine Louis • Levine Max • Lucas Joseph P • Lucas Vincent S • Michlein John C • Pulaski Joseph • . . . — Map (db m25332) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Monroe World War I Memorial
In Grateful Recognition Of the Valor and Devotion of The Young Men of this Community Who Served in the World War For Liberty and Justice 1914 -- 1919 Adams Fred Leroy • Anderlot William • Bachman George * • Bachman John Jr • Beardsley L Ben • Beardsley Ray M • Bevens Howard • Blakemas Philip S • Crouch William • Fohrenbach Fred W • Fohrenbach Henry • Fuller Leonard • Jacot Herman • Judson Frank L • Levine Louis • Levine Max • Lucas Joseph P • Lucas Vincent S • Michlein . . . — Map (db m26091) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Monroe World War II Memorial
1941   1945 Dedicated to Those Who Made the Supreme Sacrifice Victor Sippin David P. Winspur And to All Those From The Town of Monroe Who Served Our Country In World War II Sponsored by The American Legion Post #176 Through Subscription by The Townspeople of Monroe May 30, 1953 — Map (db m26094) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Original Bell of Stepney Baptist Church
Original Bell Of Stepney Baptist Church In Service From 1885 to Sept. 9, 1964 — Map (db m25341) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — PFC John K. Goett
Dedicated To PFC John K. Goett Who Gave His Life And All Those From Monroe Who Served During the Vietnam conflict From 1964 – 1973 Dedicated Nov. 11, 1984 — Map (db m26092) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — Stepney Fire House #1
Stepney 1916 Stepney Fire House #1 The first volunteer fire company in Monroe included 45 men. The group’s 1st fire truck was purchased 2nd hand from a Bridgeport fire-fighting company with money raised in part from the proceeds of the annual firemen’s “karnival.” Stepney Heritage Trail – The Sippin Family — Map (db m25343) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Monroe — The Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82
The Rochambeau Route 1781 – 82 In the Vicinity French Troops Under Duc De Lauzon Enroute From Newport To Yorktown Encamped During June 29 Through July 1st 1781 Erected by The Sons of the American Revolution Gen. Gold Selleck Silliman Branch Bridgeport, CT — Map (db m26098) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), New Canaan — New Canaan
This region was established in 1731 as Canaan Parish, a separate ecclesiastical society of the Congregational Churches of Norwalk and Stamford. Incorporated as a town in 1801. New Canaan encompassed the area of Canaan Parish with additional land annexed on the southern and western boundaries.

During the early nineteenth century, New Canaan was one of the important shoe making centers of New England. In the latter half of the nineteenth- century, considerable numbers of summer residents . . . — Map (db m46878) HM

Connecticut (Fairfield County), New Canaan — Pinney Corners
Site of the Home of Henry A. Pinney (1836-1905). The shoe factory owned by Mr. Pinney was located on land opposite his home on slightly over three acres of land at the corner of Lukes Wood and Oenoke. The factory, built in 1870, produced women’s fine shoes for thirty years and employed up to fifty people. During the period New Canaan was a major shoe manufacturing center. — Map (db m26136) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), New Fairfield — New Fairfield
Front In the year 1724 twelve men from Fairfield, Connecticut , came to this area to purchase land from the Indians who then inhabited it. They negotiated with Chief Squantz of the Schaghticoke tribe, who lived near the pond in this town which still bears his name. returning in the spring of 1725 with the necessary documents, they learned that Chief Squantz had died, but his four sons and heirs refused to sign any deeds. Four years later, on April 24, 1729 the Indians finally . . . — Map (db m23060) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), New Fairfield — New Fairfield Fire Department Memorial
Upper marker: The New Fairfield Volunteer Fire Department Dedicated To All Members Past and Present 2003 Lower marker: The New Fairfield Volunteer Fire Company, Inc. was formed in 1934 consisting of seven districts – Center, New Fairfield bay, Squantz Pond, Balls pond, Pine Hill, Haviland Hollow and Wood Creek each district was given an allotment of pails, ladders, hooks, rope and salt. In 1935 land next to the town cemetery was given to the company to build . . . — Map (db m23061) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), New Fairfield — New Fairfield Veterans Memorial
They shall not grow old as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn them. French & Indian War Samuel Fairchild Militia K.I.A. Aug. 4, 1759 Burmell Barnum Militia K.I.A. Aug. 4, 1761 Civil War Frederick C. Barnum Cpl. U.S. Army K.I.A. June 22, 1863 Augustus E. Bronson U.S. Army K.I.A. June 1, 1864 Edward Griffin Pvt. U.S. Army K.I.A. July 5, 1863 William B. Leach U.S. Army K.I.A. June 19, 1864 Henry H. Hyatt U.S. Army K.I.A. June 22, 1864 Homer B. Barnum . . . — Map (db m23063) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Cyrenius H. Booth Library
Cyrenius H. Booth Library Has Been Placed On The National Register Of Historic Places By The United States Department of the Interior 1932 — Map (db m42368) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — In Commemoration
1732 ---- 1932 In Commemoration Of The Two Hundredth Birthday Of George Washington ---- Rochambeau Established a Camp Here June 28 To July 1, 1781 ---- Soldiers Commanded By Lafayette Camped At This Spot Placed by Mary Silliman Chapter N.S.D.A.R. — Map (db m26914) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Newtown
This area, then known as Quanneapague, was purchased from the Pohtatuck Indians in 1705. Settled from Stratford and incorporated in 1711, Newtown was a stronghold of Tory settlement during the early Revolutionary War. French General Rochambeau and his troops encamped here in 1781 on their way to the siege of Yorktown, Virginia, which ended the Revolution. An important crossroads throughout its history, the village of Hawleyville briefly emerged as a railroad center and the town’s population . . . — Map (db m21235) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Newtown Meeting House
Newtown Meeting House Has Been Placed On The National Register Of Historic Places By The United States Department Of The Interior Built 1720   Moved 1792   Rebuilt 1816 & 1845 Map (db m26813) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Newtown Veterans Memorial
Newtown Remembers With Grateful Prayers And Solemn Vows Her Sacred Dead Her Honored Living Who Ventured All Unto Death That We Might Live A Republic With Independence A Nation With Union Forever A World With Righteousness And Peace For All — Map (db m21339) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Rev. John Beach, A.M.
1732     1907 Near This Spot Under a Large Buttonball Tree Rev. John Beach, A.M. Missionary of The Society For the Propagation of the Gospel Held His First Service As Rector of Trinity Church Newtown in September 1732 — Map (db m41513) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Rochambeau
In This Vicinity French Troops Under Rochambeau Enroute From Yorktown Encamped During October 1782 Erected by This State and The Cyrenius H. Booth Library Cooperating Donated by the Anders Family — Map (db m42367) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Newtown — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteHousatonic Crossing
French General Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Earl Cornwallis and the British army in . . . — Map (db m26915) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — A Habitat Renewed
In the past, the shallow and stagnant Mill Pond was not a good place for marine life. In 1996-97, the City of Norwalk undertook a $500,000 project to improve the aquatic habitat. Funds for the work came from the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Long Island Sound Programs. At the culvert connecting the pond with the harbor, a new tidal gate was installed to let in a refreshing rush of sea water twice a day. Dredging helped in several ways: • First, it removed . . . — Map (db m53485) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Battle of the Rocks Monument
On this historic ground the American Patriots bravely sustained the cause of Liberty against the British Invaders July 12, 1779 ---------- Erected by the D.A.R. of Norwalk 1894. — Map (db m53435) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Burning of Norwalk
From the summit of this hill Maj. Gen. William Tryon witnessed the Burning of Norwalk by the British troops under his command during the engagement of July 11 & 12, 1779. --------------- Erected by Norwalk Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1904 — Map (db m53434) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Fitch’s Point
Here landed The British Troops under the command of Generals Tryon and Garth, Saturday evening, July 10, 1779, preparatory to the
Burning of Norwalk, July 11, 1779. ---------- Marked by Norwalk Chapter, D.A.R. 1899. — Map (db m53437) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Flax Hill Monument
This rock marks the site of a battle between the Americans and British July 12, 1779. This cannon ball was found on the battlefield a hundred years after by the Daughters of the American Revolution 1896 — Map (db m53438) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Liberty Tree Memorial
This American Liberty Elm was named after “The Liberty Tree: Our Country’s first Symbol of Freedom.” On the morning of August 14, 1765, the people of Boston awakened to discover two effigies suspended from an elm tree in protest of the hated Stamp Act. From that day forward that elm became known as “The Liberty Tree.” It stood in silent witness to countless meetings, speeches and celebrations, and became the rallying place for the Sons of Liberty. In August of 1775, as . . . — Map (db m53918) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Mill Pond History
The Mill Pond was created, probably in the 1700s, by diking a natural coastal inlet, save for a narrow channel that would power a mill wheel. Seaview Avenue and Veterans Park were later built on more landfill. Other businesses, most notably hat factories, once stood on or near the Mill Pond’s shores. The location was good not for the view, but because for many years industries dumped their wastes into the pond. (Such discharges are now closely regulated.) — Map (db m53482) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Norwalk
First in recorded history came a navigator, Adriaen Block, in 1614 who called the Norwalk Islands “Archipelago.” In 1640 Daniel Patrick from the New Haven Colony obtained a deed from local Indians conveying land on the west side of the Norwalk River. But that colony sent no settlers to the grant. Roger Ludlow of the Connecticut Colony, perhaps to halt further penetration by Patrick’s claim towards his Fairfield settlement, secured and Indian grant of land on the east side of the . . . — Map (db m53449) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Norwalk FoundedA.D. 1849
The earliest homes were planted in the near vicinity of this stone. The first Meeting House directly opposite. West. ----------- Erected by the Norwalk Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 1895 — Map (db m53436) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Norwalk World War I Memorial
This monument is erected as a tribute of honor to the Citizens of Norwalk, Conn. who devoted themselves to the cause of freedom in the service of our country during the Great World War, 1917 – 1919 and as a memorial to the men who made the supreme sacrifice Abbott Fred E. • Amundsen Fred W. • Bates Charles • Bennett Edward • Birdsall Cortland V. • Blake Mortimer G. • Bloom Charles H. • Burwell John C. • Caffrey Thomas P. • Cantoni James G. • Cifatte Stephen • Coleman James E. • Grotty . . . — Map (db m53763) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Parish of St. Paul’s
This Parish of St. Paul’s was founded in 1737 by a missionary priest sent to the colonies from London. The present church building is the fifth erected on this site. The second structure was destroyed by the British on July 11, 1779, when General Tyron ordered the burning of Norwalk. The third church was consecrated by Samuel Seabury, the first bishop of the Episcopal Church in America. The original Altar from this church is situated in the side aisle of the present building. — Map (db m53460) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument
Erected by the Grand Army of the Republic and the citizens of South Norwalk in memory of her loyal sons 1861-1865 — Map (db m36010) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — St. Paul’s Church
St. Paul’s is one of the most beautiful stone, Gothic-Style, churches in the area. It’s dramatic 13th century English charm, stained glass, excellent acoustics, and vintage E.M. Skinner organ create an atmosphere conducive to prayer, contemplation and celebration. St. Paul’s is a diverse community, an open, affirming, and inclusive parish. This makes for a wonderful tapestry of people who gather for worship and fellowship each week. — Map (db m53462) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — St. Paul’s Historic Graveyard
This historic graveyard is one of the oldest in Norwalk. It predates the Revolutionary War and is the resting place of several patriots of the American Revolution. It is situated on the original grant of land given to the professors of the Church of England in 1733-34. It was used as a public sheepfold in the early days of the colony. Anne Kemper, the wife of the first missionary Bishop of the American Church, is buried here. Her husband, Jackson Kemper was rector of St. Paul’s from 1830 – 1835. — Map (db m53461) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Norwalk — The Birds
While the Mill Pond Restoration Project created a better environment for animals under the water, the creatures that we can see benefiting are the birds. A variety of feathered species are drawn here by the edible plant material and the small fish, crabs and other marine animals in the pond. The birds you see will vary by the time of year. REMEMBER:   Feeding “human food,” even bread, to birds is not recommended. Please enjoy watching the birds but let them forage for . . . — Map (db m53484) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Old Greenwich — Old Greenwich
Under the jurisdiction of the New Haven Colony, the first settlers in 1640 purchased land from the Siwanoy Indians. Under New Amsterdam’s protection, this settlement was a dutch manor during 1642–56. In the years 1656–65, it was combined with the town of Stamford. In 1665, Greenwich was recognized as a distinct and separate town in the Colony of Connecticut. A tax-supported church (First Congregational Church) was established. By 1690, this village was frequently called . . . — Map (db m2484) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Old Greenwich — Sound Beach Railroad Station
Built 1892, moved to this location 1895. Renamed Old Greenwich Railroad Station 1931. Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior. — Map (db m2485) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 3 — “Putnam’s Escape from Horseneck”
This bronze statue was sculpted by renowned local artist Anna Hyatt Huntington. She was 94 when she completed the statue for its 1969 dedication. The bronze depicts General Israel Putnam’s legendary ride down the stone steps in Greenwich (then called “Horseneck”), where he narrowly escaped from the British dragoons who were on a raiding party from New York City. — Map (db m69914) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 12 — Bake Oven and Upper Level Structures — Putnam Memorial State Park
With the exception of the Bake Oven, which produced bread for camp, the identity and locations of numerous other buildings on the upper level is uncertain. We know that the Bake Oven was located in this ravine. It needed water from the stream flowing near it. Other buildings on the upper level: Carpenters, Shoemakers, Taylors, Soap Boilers, Quarter Guards and Sulters. — Map (db m26903) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 11 — Barlow Circle — Putnam Memorial State Park
A resident of Redding, Joel Barlow graduated from Yale in 1778. An accomplished poet and writer, Barlow was thought to have visited the Redding army camps during the winter of 1778-89. He was a chaplain for three years in the Continental Army. — Map (db m26902) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 2 — Camp Guardhouse — Putnam Memorial State Park
Camp Guardhouse A log hut which was reconstructed about 1890 on the remains of a hut from 1778. The actual purpose of the original structure is in question, although local lore said it was the Guardhouse. The construction and size of the hut gives the visitor an approximation of one of the 116 enlisted men’s huts inside the park. Each hut contained 12 soldiers. — Map (db m26893) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 13 — Cemetery / Command Officer’s Quarters — Putnam Memorial State Park
The two mounds of stones inside the square formed by the granite posts, were thought to be the camp cemetery. Accordingly, a memorial marker was erected to mark the site in 1902. Archaeology work has proven this site to be that of a double-ended (two chimneys) officer’s quarters. Further research has pointed to the distinct probability that the hut belonged to Lt. Col. Henry Dearborn. — Map (db m26909) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Charles Burr Todd — Putnam Memorial State Park
This Tablet is Placed by the Commissioners Of Israel Putnam Memorial Camp To Perpetuate the Memory Of Charles Burr Todd 1849 – 1928 Historian and Biographer A Native of Redding, Inspired By Love For His Town And State, He Was a Leader In The Movement To Establish This Memorial Camp Ground September 1931 — Map (db m26898) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 6 — Company Street (Fireback Row) — Putnam Memorial State Park
The enlisted men’s encampment consisted of 116 log huts set in a double row for almost a quarter mile down the company street. The only above ground remains of those huts today are the piles of collapsed stone chimneys. Each stone pile of “fireback” marks the location of a 1778 log hut. The huts were 12x16 feet. Each hut was occupied by twelve soldiers. — Map (db m26896) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — First Church of Christ Congregational
About This Church This church was built in 1837 by the Methodist Episcopal Society of Redding. The building committee consisted of Thomas B. Fanton, John Read Hill, Gershom Sherwood, Jesse Banks, and David Duncomb. It served the Methodist Society until 1921 and a Federation of Methodist and Congregational Societies until 1959. Then the remaining Methodists, with Christian generosity, gave the property to the First Church Of Christ Congregational. — Map (db m26816) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Guard House
On this site stood the Guard House of 1778-9. A soldier was shot & killed by the sentry on duty when attempting to escape. — Map (db m12006) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Israel Putnam
Donated A.D. 1969 by sculptress Anna Hyatt Huntington in her 93rd year in timeless memorial to Israel Putnam Senior Major General in the Continental Army who at Greenwich, Connecticut, in February of 1779, made good a dramatic mounted escape from pursuing British Dragoons down the perilous 100 stone steps carved into the precipice at Horse Neck. — Map (db m11994) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — John Read, Gentleman
Home site of “Lonetown Manor” where John Read, Gentleman after whom the town is named settled in 1711 Title to the original 500 acres was secured by colony grants confirmed in 1714 by an Indian deed from Chief Chickens This tablet placed by Town of Redding in 1935 Connecticuts Tercentenary — Map (db m26870) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 14 — Lake McDougall — Putnam Memorial State Park
The stone dam which makes this pond was installed at the time of the park’s creation. But the stream was in existence during the 1778-79 army encampment. It is one of two main streams, one at either end of the camp, which provided water for the troops. McDougall had been commander of Putnam’s Division prior to going into winter quarters. Gen. Washington placed the division under Putnam and kept McDougall in command of the Hudson Highlands. — Map (db m26910) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 5 — Memorial Monument — Putnam Memorial State Park
Memorial Monument Constructed in 1888, one year after the commissioning of the park, this monument honors the three different camps in Redding during the winter of 1778 – 79. This monument is the very first structure erected at the park. The obelisk is built of native granite and is forty-two feet high with a two foot granite ball on top. — Map (db m26895) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 7 — Museum — Putnam Memorial State Park
This building contains exhibits and historical materials including artifacts unearthed at the campsite during archaeological excavations. The museum was built in 1921. The structure was a repository for the artifacts found in the park. This building replaced the original museum housed on the second floor of the old 1893 Pavilion (today’s Park Visitor Center). — Map (db m26897) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 8 — Officers Quarters — Putnam Memorial State Park
The chimney remains mark the site of a company officer’s hut. The hut was a replica built in 1890 on the original site. The company-level officer’s huts were located behind the enlisted hut line. There are several other firebacks of these junior officers hut remains in the woods behind the enlisted hut line. — Map (db m26899) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 10 — Officers Quarters / Magazine — Putnam Memorial State Park
This structure was reconstructed in 1890 on the foundations of the original 1778 building. Long thought to be an officer’s barracks, recent information is now leading archaeologists to believe that it was actually the camp magazine which held the kegs of gunpowder. The location far away from the troop quarters and being semi-enclosed in the earthen bank support this theory. — Map (db m26901) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 9 — Philips Cave — Putnam Memorial State Park
Local legend says a shallow cave in this rock outcrop was used by one Mr. Philips. Philips was a soldier who returned after the war to live in this cave. He led the life of a lonely hermit, including liberating an occasional chicken, or produce from local farmers. He was evicted by the community. Another version said he was “permanently removed!” — Map (db m26900) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 4 — Putnam Memorial State Park
Putnam Memorial State Park This park commemorates the three winter encampments in 1778 – 79 of Major General Isreal Putnam’s division of Continental Army troops during the Revolutionary War. The memorial park was created on the actual site of one of the three encampments. Gen. Washington positioned his troops in a crescent shape around the British army in NY City. The troops camped in Redding were used to protect the Long Island Sound, the Hudson Highlands and, especially, the . . . — Map (db m26890) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Redding
Originally part of Fairfield and unclaimed land, Redding was settled about 1711, made a parish in 1729, and incorporated in 1767. It was named for John Read, gentleman, lawyer, early landowner, and spokesman for the settlers. One of his land purchases was from the Mohawk Indian sachem Chickens in 1714. In 1777, during the Revolutionary war, General Tryon led British troops over Redding Ridge on their way to burn Danbury. The right wing of the Continental Army under General Israel Putnam . . . — Map (db m26814) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Redding Citizens
In memory of the Redding citizens captured nearby April 26, 1777 & imprisoned in New York for ransom by British General William Tryon & his invading army. Russell Bartlett • Stephen Betts + • Daniel Chapman * • Thomas Couch • David Fairchild • Ezekial Fairchild * • Jabez Frost • Daniel Meeker • Timothy Parsons • Jonas Platt • James Rogers + • Jeremiah Sanford * • Oliver Sanford • Nathaniel Squire * Died Imprisoned           + Selectman and Ned A Redding slave whose ultimate freedom came by . . . — Map (db m69916) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — The Hill Academy
This tablet is placed to perpetuate the memory of Aaron Sanford Hill 1800 – 1893 Interest in his native town and in public education inspired him to found The Hill Academy Erected on this site in 1883, this building, remodeled by the town and the trustees of the Hill Academy Corporation, was transferred to the Town of Redding, March 4, 1932, to be used forever as a public school, and by a vote of the town to be named The Hill School — Map (db m26871) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Town of Redding World War I Memorial
Town of Redding 1914   Roll of Honor   1918 Erected in Appreciation of The Services of Our Men and Women Who Served in the World War Harold Albin • Carl A. Anderson • Hubert Anderson • Sigurd Anderson • Edward Babcock • Harry Barrett • Benjamin H. Bell • Elsie Bennett • Sarah Bennett • Douglas Boddie • Edward M. Bradley • Howard Brown • John H. Carson • William B. Claflin • Harold Connery • Seth Couch • Raymond Cunningham • Niles Curtis • Robert Darragh • Thomas . . . — Map (db m26815) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Unknown Heroes
In memory of the Unknown Heroes buried here. — Map (db m11999) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — 1 — Visitor Center (1893 Pavilion) — Putnam Memorial State Park
Visitor Center (1893 Pavilion) This building was originally built in 1893 as the park pavilion. It was used as a shelter for park visitors during inclement weather, for dances and picnics. The upstairs was used as the original park museum. The building was dismantled board by board in 2005, and reconstructed into a four-season climate-controlled visitor center. — Map (db m26891) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Redding — Winter Quarters of Putnam’s Division
. . . — Map (db m11997) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 12 — A Much-Loved Old Church and a Watering Trough for HorsesRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The Methodist Episcopal Church had its beginnings in Ridgefield 1n 1787 when the first meeting was held – just 21 years after Methodism had been introduced into the U.S. from England. In 1789 Jesse Lee, a native of Virginia, was sent north as a circuit rider. His third sermon in Connecticut was preached at the Independent Schoolhouse on Main St. In 1841 a second meetinghouse was built, and in 1883 the building was moved back on the property where it was enlarged and remodeled in the . . . — Map (db m31936) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 2 — Bailey Avenue: A Short-Cut to the Train StationRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Louis Bailey (1819-1899), a prominent member of the community, created Bailey Avenue for the purpose of building stores and residences, and for access to the train depot on Prospect St. He was an incorporator of the Ridgefield Savings Bank, a state senator, owner of the Bailey Inn and principal of Bailey and Gage, located in Old Hundred. In 1882, Phineas Lounsbury donated land and money to build an elementary school on the northern side of Bailey Avenue. By 1912 the Center School . . . — Map (db m31998) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 9 — Ballard ParkRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Philip Burr Bradley was one of the earliest owners of the property. Bradley, a cousin of Aaron Burr, was placed in command of the Fifth CT Regt. in the Revolutionary War, and commanded a battalion at the Battle of Ridgefield. He also served in the State Legislature, was a Justice of the Peace, the first Postmaster, and a friend of George Washington. Lucius H. Biglow, music publisher and partner in the firm of Biglow & Main in New York City, came here at the urging of his partner who lived . . . — Map (db m24808) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Battle of RidgefieldApril 27, 1777
The Third and Chief Engagement Occurred on This Ridge — Map (db m23395) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Battle of Ridgefield Dead
In defense of American Independence at the Battle of Ridgefield April 27, 1777 died Eight Patriots who were laid in this ground companioned by Sixteen British Soldiers Living, their enemies, Dying their guests, in honor of service and sacrifice this Memorial is placed for the strengthening of hearts. — Map (db m23396) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 22 — Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua KingRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
On September 23, 1780, on his way through American lines to New York City, Major John Andre of the British Army was captured, taken prisoner and brought to American headquarters in South Salem, N.Y. Andre had plotted with General Benedict Arnold to betray the American fortress at West Point and when captured was found to have concealed the plans of West Point in his boot. Lt. Joshua King was given the charge of watching over Andre until he was hanged as a spy on October 2, 1780. Lt. King . . . — Map (db m32002) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 18 — Bissell's – Destroyed by Two ConflagrationsRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Hiram K. Scott set up the town's first variety and drug store in 1853. Scott was an influential businessman, serving as postmaster, town clerk, probate judge and a druggist for 50 years. He sold his store to Harvey Bissell in the summer of 1895, just six months before the Great Fire destroyed the building. Bissell rebuilt the following year and the drugstore continued in business until, in 2005 it once again burned to the ground. Bissell's lives on although it has moved a half block to . . . — Map (db m31587) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 29 — Branchville – A Center of Italian–American LifeRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
A Small Village began to emerge in the area in 1852 with the opening of the Danbury-and-Norwalk Railroad line. Stores, a hotel, a post office, a school and small industries in the area were establishes. The building that housed the Branchville General Store, owned by the DeBenigno family, still stands just east of the train station. It was the center of the Italian community in the area. Newly arrived immigrants were frequently housed there until they found work and homes of their own. . . . — Map (db m31967) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ensign James Benedict House
c. 1730 Ensign James Benedict Cobbler's Shop and Home — Map (db m32243) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Gen. David Wooster
On this spot fell Gen. David Wooster Mortally Wounded April 27,1777, at the Battle of Ridgefield — Map (db m23397) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Keeler Tavern
The Keeler Tavern served as headquarters for the Patriots during the Battle of Ridgefield, April 27, 1777. It is now owned by the Keeler Tavern Preservation Society and maintained as an historical building. — Map (db m23410) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 25 — Keeler Tavern and the “Big Shop”Ridgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Built as a farmhouse in 1713 on Lot#2 by David Hoyt, it was sold to his grandson Timothy Keeler, who converted it into an inn/tavern in 1772. The Keeler Tavern, which also served as a post office, was inherited by Anna Keeler, Timothy’s daughter, who with her husband, Abijah Resseguie and their daughter Anna Marie operated it as a hotel. For many years the building was a stagecoach stop on the line from New York to Boston. Its reputation for hospitality and service made it a favorite . . . — Map (db m23411) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 11 — Main Street in the Late 1800sRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Looking south from Prospect Street, where the shops and offices of Yankee Ridge are today, stood homes at the beginning of the 20th century. From the left are the Osborn house, owned by Richard Osborn, owner of the Ridgefield Lumber Company; the home of Dr. Howard P. Mansfield; the Dauchy house, which was torn down in the 1960s to make way for a commercial building at 440 Main St.; and the Lannon house. Gone are the fields that existed back then and all but one of the elm trees that lined . . . — Map (db m24807) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 17 — More of the Great FireRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
On the Night of December 8, 1895 a fire broke out in the undertaking and furniture store of Bedient & Mead at the northeast corner of Main St. and Bailey Ave. The fire spread rapidly to the adjoining Western Union telegraph office and Barhite & Valden's general store. Fire continued east on Bailey Ave. consuming businesses and apartments, jumped across the street and partially burned Hiram Scott's livery stable. Next to burn was Town Hall, the Masonic Hall, and several homes and . . . — Map (db m31586) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Old Hundred
Old Hundred 1783 This Structure Was Originally The Store of Lts. Joshua King And James Dole, Later Used As A Resi- dence Known As "Old Hundred." — Map (db m30464) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 13 — Out of the Ashes …Ridgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The Fire District in Ridgefield was organized in 1896 following the devastating fire of 1895. Ex-Governor Phineas Lounsbury was an early benefactor of the Department and the new engine company took his name. The firehouse is also the site of the old Sholes and Smith Shirt factory, later moved to the Big Shop then located at the corner of Main Street and West Lane. The eastern section is the original 1908 Georgian Revival Style building of brick and wood with granite corner quions. . . . — Map (db m32050) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Place Where Wooster Fell
David Wooster, in command of the Conn Troops Born in Stratford March 13, 1711 Mortally wounded April 27, 1777 while defending the liberties of America and nobly died at Danbury May 2, 1777. Give me Liberty of give me death. — Map (db m23431) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 30 — Quarries, Abrasives and the "Fresh Air" KidsRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The Bridgeport Wood Refinishing Company and Silex Mills had a plant on the eastern side of Route 7, north of the Branchville train station, and a much larger one at the intersection of Branchville Road and Route 7 along the newly built branch line into Ridgefield. The company ground quartz into powder to be used in paints and stains, as well as producing abrasives for polishing and other products. Stone came from quarries in the Branchville area, but some came in by train to the company's . . . — Map (db m31966) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Rev. Thomas Hawley House
This house is the Oldest in Ridgefield ----------- Built in 1713 --- by --- Rev. Thomas Hawley First Pastor and Town Clerk — Map (db m32000) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 28 — Ridgebury – George Washington Slept HereRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Ridgebury, "The New Patent," was one of the last land purchases made by the Proprietors. Tradition says that the First Congregational Church in Ridgebury had its beginnings in the "New Patent Meeting House" as early as 1738. In 1768 the congregation voted to construct a new church, which was completed in 1769. Services at the Episcopal Church in Ridgebury began at the same time as those in Ridgefield, often sharing the same minister. The building continued to be used, except for the . . . — Map (db m32052) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgebury Congregational Church
Gathered       Built 1760            1851 This property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior < Second Plaque: > Connecticut Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route 1780 - 1782 — Map (db m23423) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgefield
This town was founded in 1708 by a group of families from Norwalk who purchased twenty thousand acres from the Ramapoo Indians for one hundred pounds sterling. They were aided by John Copp, a surveyor, who explored the land now lying between High Ridge and East Ridge and recommended it as a promising agricultural area, suitable for settlement. In 1777 at the Battle of Ridgefield, Colonial militia fought British and Hessian troops returning from a raid on American military stores in Danbury. . . . — Map (db m23409) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgefield Veterans Memorial
Center Panel: Honor Roll World War II and Korean War Action “Into the Mosaic of Victory, These Priceless Jewels Were Set” In Supreme Sacrifice World War II Acocella, Charles • Bell, William P. • Birarelli, James J. • Blume, Robert N. • Cogswell, Charles G. • Frulla, Armondo • Hall, William H. • Nelson, John E. • Polverari, Geno J. • Rose, Walter • Schere, Meinhard H. • Scott, Harold • Ward, Thomas A. • Vance, Lee P. “I do . . . — Map (db m23875) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ridgefield Veterans Monument
[ west side ] To the Memory of The Citizens of Ridgefield Who Served Their Country In the Wars of the Republic 1775 – 1918 Erected by the People of Ridgefield MCMXXIV [ east side ] War of the Revolution Patrick Ambrose • Amos Baker • Bartholomew Baker • Seth Baker • John Baldwin • John Barns • Wakeman Barrett • Stephen Beers • Abijah Benedict • Daniel Benedict • Darius Benedict • Gamaliel Benedict • Jesse Benedict • John Benedict • Benjamin Bennett • . . . — Map (db m31972) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 24 — Ridgefield's Colonial PlansRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The First Recorded Plan for settlement was in 1697 when a group of Congregationalists primarily from Norwalk petitioned "to purchase of the Indians a certain tract of land lying about 14 miles northward of the town of Norwalk to settle a plantation there." On May 13, 1708 a petition for purchase of the land was submitted to the General Assembly in Hartford. On September 30, 1708 the purchase was formalized and plans for settlement were being drawn up. Each of the original Proprietors . . . — Map (db m32048) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 26 — Settler’s RockRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The first surveyors came north from Norwalk to determine the suitability of the land for settlement as a plantation. Tradition says that they spent their first night on top of Settler’s Rock and that fires were built at its base to protect them against wild animals. It is probable that they singled out the rock as a prominent landmark in the wilderness because of its great size and elevated location along the Indian trail to the Titicus River. Titicus was part of the second purchase of . . . — Map (db m23420) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Settlers Rock
On this rock the original settlers scouting party spent their first night 1708 – 1958 A.D. — Map (db m23418) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 6 — Smith Tavern – A Colonial Meeting PlaceRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The Smith Tavern stood on the site of the present library. Ebenezer Smith arrived from Milford in 1709 and was assigned Lot # 26. He opened a small tavern in his home. By 1797 a new building was erected on the site by Amos Smith, who ran a tavern and inn, as well as a cider mill behind the tavern and a vineyard on the western side of Main Street. Taverns were used for more than eating and drinking; they were important centers for community activities. In 1900 the Smith Family sold the . . . — Map (db m24806) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 15 — St. Mary Church and RectoryRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
A New Catholic Church was first planned in 1896. This Victorian Gothic building was completed and dedicated on July 5, 1897. This building is described by the Ridgefield Preservation Trust as "… one of Ridgefield's finest buildings…a complex and disciplined design [and] reflects the idealistic romantic approach to the architecture of the Victorian age." On September 12, 1901 its bell tolled for the first time on the occasion of the death of President William McKinley. The Victorian-style . . . — Map (db m32049) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 20 — State Police and the Benjamin Franklin SchoolRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Looking Towards East Ridge from Governor Street, the four buildings on the hill have been an important part of Ridgefield's landscape for the last 100 years. On the left is the George Rockwell home, which, with the house next door was once the Vinton School for Girls. By the 1920s, the Connecticut State Police moved into the Rockwell house and made it their home for the next 50 years. When they relocated to Southbury it became the headquarters for the Ridgefield Police Department. The . . . — Map (db m31588) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Battle of RidgefieldApril 27, 1777
The chief engagement of Connecticut’s only inland battle during the War for Independence was fought approximately 100 yards from this site. Several hundred hastily-mustered militia joined a handful of Continental troops under Generals Benedict Arnold and Gold Stilliman to face British regulars more than thrice their number led by Major General William Tryon. Only an hour before, American General David Wooster fell mortally wounded during his second attack on the British rearguard as it . . . — Map (db m23400) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 8 — The Battle of Ridgefield, April 27, 1777Ridgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
British General Tryon’s Raid on Danbury occurred on April 26, 1777. The beginning of the 1777 campaign was the first British invasion and the only pitched battle in Connecticut. Following the burning of Danbury the British troops marched through Ridgefield the next day on their way back to their ships moored at Compo Beach in Westport. The first skirmish, under the leadership of American General David Wooster occurred at the intersection of Barlow Mountain Road and North Salem Road. The . . . — Map (db m23412) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Confederate Bell
The Confederate bell was captured during the Civil War by Colonel Alexander Warner who later presented it to Governor Phineas Lounsbury. For many years the bell stood on the Grounds of the Lounsbury Mansion, which in 1953 became the Community Center. After cleaning and repairing the bell, it was mounted on this pedestal and rededicated to the Town of Ridgefield in a ceremony held July 4, 1971 — Map (db m23575) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 7 — The Elms Inn and Stebbins HomesteadRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
In 1799, Thomas Rockwell opened a small carpentry shop which later became part of the Elms Inn. It was also a shoemaker’s shop and later, a tin shop operated by Francis Rockwell. Francis was also a vintner whose vineyard was across the street between Catoonah and Gilbert Streets. In 1860 John Rockwell opened the Elm Shade Cottages to serve wealthy New Yorkers arriving to vacation in the country during the summer months. The restaurant and inn still serve the public. Dr. Amos Baker was . . . — Map (db m23435) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The First Society of Ridgefield
The First Society of Ridgefield was formed in 1725 under the leadership of The Reverend Samuel L. Johnson The name St. Stephen's was given in the year 1831, the year in which it became a parish. The Church of the Living God, the pillar and ground of the truth Timothy 3:15 — Map (db m31965) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Gilbert HouseCirca 1790
Built by Benjamin Stebbins for his daughter Sarah and her husband Amos Baker, a Revolutionary War Hero, the first surgeon in Ridgefield and the originator of the famous Baker Apple. — Map (db m23602) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 1 — The Great Fire of 1895Ridgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The East Side of Main Street as it appeared the day after the devastating fire of 1895. (See Panel #17 for a description of the fire.) Barhite & Valden General Store and the Western Union telegraph office next door were located just north of the Gage building, where the fire started on December 8, 1895. All three buildings burned to the ground. The Gage building housed Bedient and Mead Furniture and Undertaking. Bedient bought out his partner's share and after rebuilding opened . . . — Map (db m31585) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 14 — The Livery Stable and the First Catholic ChurchRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Whitlock's Livery, later the Sperry Livery stable, was across the street from the firehouse. Whitlock ran a stage to the Branchville station before the branch line was built in 1870. The livery stable also boarded horses, including those used by the fire department. One of Sperry's employees remembered weekends when a party coming from the station to one of the "summer cottages" would have from 12 to 20 trunks delivered by their drivers. Sperry's was replaced by Young's Feed Store. In . . . — Map (db m32051) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Lounsbury House
Lounsbury House Circa 1896 has been placed on the National Register Of Historic Places — Map (db m23877) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Museum in the StreetsRidgefield, Connecticut
Welcome to Ridgefield's History Trail! Ridgefield, Connecticut – 1708 The Fundamental Orders adopted by Connecticut in 1639 directed would-be settlers, able to support a minister, to establish a settlement, build a Congregational Church and farm the land. This is exactly what was done in Ridgefield. On September 30, 1708 a group of inhabitants from Norwalk and Milford, Connecticut purchased a parcel of land called Caudatowa, or "high land", from the resident Ramapo tribe for one . . . — Map (db m31997) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Museum in the StreetsRidgefield, Connecticut
Welcome to Ridgefield's History Trail! Ridgefield, Connecticut – 1708 The Fundamental Orders adopted by Connecticut in 1639 directed would-be settlers, able to support a minister, to establish a settlement, build a Congregational Church and farm the land. This is exactly what was done in Ridgefield. On September 30, 1708 a group of inhabitants from Norwalk and Milford, Connecticut purchased a parcel of land called Caudatowa, or "high land", from the resident Ramapo tribe for one . . . — Map (db m32234) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — The Original Episcopal Church
Here stood the original Episcopal Church erected in 1740 partly burned by British soldiers during the battle of Ridgefield April 27, 1777 — Map (db m31964) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 4 — The Ridgefield Train StationRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
In 1870, A Branch Line from the Branchville train station was built to offer service to the wealthy New Yorkers who began arriving to spend their summers in Ridgefield. Many of these "summer people" had their own private railroad cars. Chauffeurs would meet them, driving horse and buggies and other fancy conveyances to carry volumes of luggage to their estates located throughout the town. Benvenuto Carboni arrived in 1901, one of the earliest Italians to come to Ridgefield. Several . . . — Map (db m31591) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 3 — The Spotting Tower and Railroad WarehousingRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The Small, White Octagonal Building on the corner was originally built as a boathouse on the estate of F.E. Lewis. It was moved behind the high school on East Ridge during World War II, and used as a warming hut for volunteers looking for enemy planes on the tower next to it. Over 200 men, women and children counted and identified more than 2,000 planes. In 1944 the Army shut down the site, but it was reactivated during the Cold War in the early 1950s. The warming hut was moved and the . . . — Map (db m31590) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 23 — The Town Common and Hauley HouseRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The First Meeting House was built on the green in 1713. In 1723 the first Congregational Meeting House was erected and served as a school, church and government building. It was replaced in 1800 by a second Meeting House, in use until 1888 when the current church on the corner of West Lane and Main Street was dedicated. The Town Common, today encompassing much of the front yard of the Methodist Church, was used for militia drills as early as 1727. The first pound was built in the . . . — Map (db m31999) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 16 — The Village Center in the Early 1900sRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
Henry Mead and His Wife are seen standing on the stoop of their grocery store in the early part of the 20th century. The building was moved when Ridgefield Hardware built their new store in 1948. Today Ridgefield Hardware is one of the oldest family businesses in Ridgefield. The Scott house, to the right of the Mead Store was built around 1714 on Proprietor's Lot #13 by Irish-born David Scott. In 1925 the house was moved around the corner to Catoonah Street to make way for Ernest . . . — Map (db m31937) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 10 — The Village in the 1900sRidgefield, Connecticut — The Museum in the Streets
The International Order Of Odd Fellows, Pilgrim Lodge No. 45 was established in Ridgefield in 1847, meeting in the Masonic Hall until 1895 when the structure was destroyed in the Great Fire. The Odd Fellows built their own building in 1928 and it soon became a popular meeting place. During the 1930s and 40s many dances and other activities were held there. In 1956 the Lodge sold the building and moved to a carriage house on King Lane where it is now part of the Methodist Church. The . . . — Map (db m31970) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — 27 — Titicus: An Industrial CenterThe Museum in the Streets — Ridgefield, Connecticut
Mills first appeared along the Titicus River in the early part of the 18th century. Sawmills, the first to come, permitted the proprietors to build frame houses instead of rough log cabins. Titicus also boasted the largest tannery in town, which was owned by Jabez Mix Gilbert, known as “Uncle Mix.” Uncle Mix was known for his generosity towards the poor, and was a founder of the Methodist Church here. Later, his business was sold to David Valden whose homestead, built in 1857, . . . — Map (db m23609) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary RouteRidgefield
French General Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Comte de Rochambeau, and thousands of French ground and naval forces arrived in Newport in July of 1780 to assist the Americans in the War for Independence. After wintering in Newport, Rochambeau’s troops marched through Connecticut to join General George Washington’s Continental Army, just over the New York border. The combined forces moved down the eastern seaboard and confronted Lieutenant General Lord Cornwallis and the British army in . . . — Map (db m23416) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Ridgefield — Ye Burying Yard
Ye Burying Yard Ridgefield's Oldest Cemetery Restored 1988 maintained by The Caudatowa Garden Club & Parks & Recreation Dept. The Burying Yard contains a monument listing 40 people who were buried in this cemetery between 1708 and about 1760. No original stones still stand. Inscribed on the stone monument in the Burying Yard: Ye burying Yard. Lay'd out ye Nov. 25. 1708 by the first Settlers of the Town of Ridgefield. Samuel Keeler • Sarah Keeler • Annie . . . — Map (db m32237) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — City of Shelton Emergency Services Memorial
City Of Shelton In Memory Of Our Departed Emergency Services Members Who Have Given Their Lives In The Line Of Duty While Protecting the Lives and Property of Our Citizens Shelton Fire Department Daniel E. Wannagot 1991 Shelton Police Department William E. Rich 1964 • James J. Mattioli 1997 Dedicated This Date Oct. 12, 1991 Mayor Michael E. Pacowta — Map (db m25612) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Commodore Isaac Hull Bridge
Commodore Isaac Hull Bridge Named for the Heroic Commander Of the U.S. Frigate “Constitution” During Its Great Naval Victories In the War of 1812 Born in Derby March 9, 1773 Resided in Shelton 1785 – 1794 This Memorial Tablet Placed by The Derby Historical Society 1951 — Map (db m25381) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Constitution Oak
This Is A Constitution Oak Presented To Riverview Park –1902 – By Senator Sturges Whitlock Delegate To The Constitutional Convention This Marker Placed – 1934 – By Kiwanis Club Of Shelton — Map (db m28318) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Fort Hill
Fort Hill On This Point Of Land The Pootatuck Indians Built A Fort In 1673 To Prevent The White Man From Coming Up The Ousatonic River — Map (db m28322) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Freedom Tree
Freedom Tree To Honor Iranian Hostages Released On January 20, 1981 After 444 Days In Captivity Proclamation & Historical Records Are Contained In Vault On This Site Eugene M. Hope Mayor [ Inscribed on the edge ] Vault & Stone Donated by Joseph A. Pagliaro Sr. — Map (db m25609) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Huntington World War II Memorial
1941         1945 Honor Roll Of Those Who Went From Huntington To Serve Their Country Eli J. Baldwin • Robert L. Baldwin • Margarte E. Bassett • Royal O. Birdseye • Stanley R. Block • Howard R. Bonnell • James L. Burkle • George E. Carter • Albert E. Cawthra • Alice L. Cawthra • William J. Cawthra • Catherine H. Chiapis • Michael D. Christo • William Cooper • Raymond J. Cox • Ullainne E. Cox • Gerald Cuda • Louis J. Cuda • Robert Deline • James H. Denzer • George A. Dubail • . . . — Map (db m25376) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Shelton
[ front ] Shelton 1639 – Stratford area settled, with present-day Shelton as the northern part. 1717 – Northern settlers established Ripton parish. 1789 – Ripton separated from Stratford and became the town of Huntington, named for Governor Samuel Huntington. 1870 – Derby-Shelton dam built., allowing industrial development along the Housatonic River. 1915 – The borough of Shelton incorporated as a city, named for Edward N. Shelton, . . . — Map (db m25614) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Shelton Locks
The Shelton locks from Housatonic River to the canal system were built in 1867, allowing canal boats to be raised through 3 sets of locks by water entering each lock, one at a time, raising the boat approximately 10 feet. It was then brought forward into the second and third locks to canal level and through the gates that divided each section. — Map (db m27118) HM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Shelton Veterans Monument
A Victory Denied Vietnam War 1961 – 1975 The Forgotten War Korean War 1950 – 1953 Freedom Is Not Free World War II 1941 – 1945 The War To End All Wars World War I 1917 – 1918 [ Names inscribed on the back ] World War I Charles W. Sutter   USA • Thomas Arena   USA • Joseph Bernabeo   USA • Chester A. Burke   USMC • John Dudginsky   USA • Edward Gardner   USA • William R. Dunn   USA • John McKay   USA • . . . — Map (db m25613) WM
Connecticut (Fairfield County), Shelton — Shelton World War I Monument
Honor Roll Tablet Erected By The City of Shelton In Honor of the Men of This Community In the Military or Naval Forces of Our Country Erected November 1918 [ center column ] Died In Service Thomas Arena • Joseph Bernabeo • John Budzensky • William R. Dunn • Shester A. Gade • Edward Gardner • Peter T. Gibbons • T. F. Haussler • John McKay • Raymond B. Scranton • Charles W. Sutter • William H. Von Werder Carlo Aiello • Daniel Alberico • Richard J. Allen • . . . — Map (db m28282) HM
250 markers matched your search criteria.
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 283 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.