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Delaware Markers
533 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 283
Delaware (Kent County), Andrewville — KC-64 — Bethel Methodist Church
The roots of Methodism in this community can be traced to the late 18th century, when Methodist pioneers such as Francis Asbury traveled throughout this area spreading the message of their faith. Over time some church members became dissatisfied with the organization and government of the established Methodist Episcopal Church. As a result, the Methodist Protestant Church was founded in 1830. Soon thereafter a group of local Methodists affiliated with the new church began to . . . — Map (db m60462) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — K-55 — Brecknock
In 1680 Alexander Humphreys received a warrant from the county court for 600 acres of land which he called Brecknock. The tract is believed to have been named for a shire of Wales. A milling operation was established here in the 1740’s. For nearly two centuries local farmers brought their grain to this place, known for much of that time as Howell’s Mill. The present mansion house was constructed in several stages, with the first section believed to have been built by the mid 18th century. . . . — Map (db m39507) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-41 — Camden
Founded 1783 on the tract “Brecknock” by Daniel Mifflin and settled largely by Quakers. Once called Piccadilly and Mifflins Cross Roads. Incorporated 1852, it was a center of anti-slavery sentiment. Several homes were by tradition stops on the Underground Railroad — Map (db m39508) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-72 — Camden
The history of this community can be traced to the 1780s, when members of the Mifflin family began dividing their land into lots. Much of this land was originally a part of a tract known as Brecknock, which was granted to Alexander Humphreys in 1680. Located at the intersection of two important thoroughfares, a number of homes and businesses were soon constructed here. First known as Mifflin’s Crossroads, and also Piccadilly, the village of Camden was firmly established by the 1790s. The town . . . — Map (db m39511) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-73 — Camden Friends Meeting
Burial Place of John Hunn This house of worship, built in 1805, was first a Preparative Meeting under the care of Motherkiln (Murderkill) Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). In 1830, Camden Monthly Meeting was formed by uniting with Motherkiln and Duck Creek Monthly Meetings. It has since absorbed all other Quaker Meetings in Kent and Sussex Counties. Many members were active in the anti-slavery movement. Local Quakers such as the Hunn, Jenkins, and Cowgill families, . . . — Map (db m39513) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — John Hunn1814 - 1894 — Quaker Abolitionist
Chief engineer of the Underground Rail Road in the State of Del. and the richest man in Del. He was convicted and fined in 1846 by the U.S. Dist. Court, later he was fined twice for $10,000.00 each by Del. but was advised the fines wouldn't be imposed if he'd promise not to continue his efforts to aid fugitives in their escape from slavery. Instead, Hunn avowed never to withhold a helping hand from the down-trodden in their hour of distress. His great land holdings and all his possessions were . . . — Map (db m39514) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-82 — Morning Star Institutional Church of God in Christ, Inc.
In 1856, the trustees of Whatcoat Methodist Episcopal Church purchased this site from Thomas Mifflin. The present church was erected thereafter and dedicated on July 26, 1857. Extensive renovations of the structure were undertaken in 1865 and 1940. The building was expanded with the addition of a nine-room educational annex in 1948. The Whatcoat congregation continued to worship here until 1967, when services were moved to a new church nearby. After a decade of continued use as a center for . . . — Map (db m39512) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — KC-100 — Site of Whatcoat Church
In 1791 Daniel Lowber granted permission for “the society of people called Methodists” to erect a “meeting house” at this location. The site was formally conveyed to church trustees in 1796. Adjoining land was obtained in 1813 for use as a public burying ground. The church was named for Richard Whatcoat (1736-1806), a native of England who was sent to this country by John Wesley in 1784 to assist with the formation of new churches and plan the future of American . . . — Map (db m39601) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Camden — K-50 — Star Hill A.M.E. Church
By the end of the 18th century this area was home to a large number of African Americans, many of them freed slaves. Their settlement was largely due to the efforts of local Quakers. A congregation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church was established here circa 1863. On June 12, 1866, the congregation purchased land from Henry W. Postles as the site for their church, which they named “Star of the East.” Members of the church are believed to have participated in the activities . . . — Map (db m39605) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Cheswold — KC-83 — Cheswold Volunteer Fire Company
This company was organized on February 2, 1928, when a group of interested citizens met at C. H. Pearson’s Store for the purpose of electing officers. William S. Scarborough was chosen to be the President of the organization, and Willard D. Boyce was selected to serve as the first Chief. Funds to support the company were raised through subscriptions, suppers, and carnivals. The first fire truck purchased was a used Ford Model T Chemical Wagon. The Cheswold Volunteer Fire Company was formally . . . — Map (db m39050) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Cheswold — Little Creek Hundred
Originally embraced all lands south of Leipsic Creek and north of Little Creek from Delaware River to Maryland line. In 1869 western half was detached and joined to western half of Duck Creek Hundred to form Kenton Hundred. — Map (db m39049) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Cheswold — KC5 — Little Creek Hundred
Originally embraced all lands south of Leipsic Creek and north of Little Creek from Delaware River to Maryland line. In 1869 western half was detached and joined to western half of Duck Creek Hundred to form Kenton Hundred. — Map (db m39051) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Clayton — KC-74 — Site of Blackiston Methodist Church
A local society of Methodists was organized circa 1778. On May 16, 1781, they obtained land here on which to build a permanent house of worship. A large frame church was then constructed and named Blackiston's Chapel, to honor the family that provided the site. For many years it was the largest Methodist church on the Delmarva Peninsula. Many of the pioneers of Methodism visited here to preach. In 1847, the old church was moved and a new one was erected in its place. This building continued to . . . — Map (db m40190) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Clayton — KC-59 — Town of Clayton
First known as Smyrna Station, the Town of Clayton began when the railroad came to this area in the mid-1850s. In 1860, the name was changed to honor Delawarean John M. Clayton, a former United States Secretary of State and strong advocate of the railroad. The town was incorporated on April 15, 1887. Clayton became one of Delmarva’s largest rail centers in the late nineteenth century – serving as the hub for four railroad lines including the Delaware Railroad, the Maryland & Delaware . . . — Map (db m39023) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — An Army of Restoration (CCC)
To provide employment and vocational training for youthful citizens of the United States…through the performance of useful public work in connection with the conservation and development of the natural resources of the United States and its possessions. (CCC Federal Enacting Legislation, 1933) During the dark days of the Great Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps conserved some of America’s most precious natural resources—its land and young men. Between 1933 and 1942, this . . . — Map (db m4491) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Armed Forces Memorial
This monument is dedicated to remember those men and women missing in action while serving in the Armed Services of the United States of America

Korean War Clifton E. Brooks – PFC U.S. Army • Samuel L. Crawford – PFC U.S. Army • Paul N. Dill – Cpt U.S. Army • Joseph P. Donahue – PFC U.S. Army • Richard D. Hutchinson – PFC U.S. Army • William S. Kempen, Jr – ILT U.S. Army • Laurence C. Layton – ILT U.S. Air Force • Thomas . . . — Map (db m39725) WM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Battles and Engagements of the Delaware Regiment
Battles around New York City and Environs, 1776-1779 1. Long Island, August 27, 1776 2. Throg's Neck, October 12-18, 1776 3. Mamaroneck Raid, October 22, 1776 4. White Plains, October 28, 1776 5. Retreat across New Jersey, November-December 1776 6. Trenton, December 26, 1776 7. Staten Island, August 22, 1777 8. Stony Point, July 16, 1779 Philadelphia Campaign, 1777-1778 1. Brandywine, September 11, 1777 2. Germantown, October 4, 1777 . . . — Map (db m39713) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Bioretention
This facility was converted from a stormwater pond into a bioretention facility in 2009. A bioretention facility, also known as a rain garden, filters polluted stormwater before it enters into a waterway.

When it rains, water washes over parking lots picking up pollutants like oil, garbage, sediment, and gasoline. Without stormwater management, this pollution would run directly into the river. At this site, the bioretention facility intercepts such pollutants before they can reach the Saint Jones River. — Map (db m51116) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — K-43 — Bishop Richard Allen
Richard Allen founded and became the first Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1816. Born into slavery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on February 14, 1760, Allen and his family were sold to a family near Dover in 1772. While there, he purchased his freedom, became a minister and joined the Continental Army as a non-combatant during the Revolutionary War. After returning to Philadelphia, he and Sussex Countian, Absalom Jones, founded the Free African Society in 1787. He helped . . . — Map (db m39093) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-88 — Booker T. Washington School
On November 13, 1922, 210 children and 6 teachers marched from two old school buildings located on Slaughter Street and Division Street to a new school for African- American students in Dover. Funding for the building was provided by the Delaware School Auxiliary Association, through the generosity of P. S. duPont. The school was named for Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), a former slave who became the nation’s foremost African-American educator. Originally built for Grades 1-8, this was the . . . — Map (db m39064) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-53 — Byfield
Near this site stood the boyhood home of Caesar Rodney, signer of the Declaration of Independence, Brigadier General of the State's militia (1775-1778), and President (Governor) of Delaware (1778-1781). Byfield was originally settled in the early 1680's by Daniel Jones, Rodney's maternal great grandfather. Following Jones' death, it became the family seat for three generations of the Rodney family. Caesar Rodney spent his formative years here and eventually acquired ownership of the property . . . — Map (db m75835) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Caesar Rodney
Statesman, Soldier and Patriot. Member of Stamp Act Congress and of First and Second Continental Congresses. Signer of Declaration of Independence. Member and Speaker of Colonial Assembly of “Three Lower Counties on Delaware.” Member of Council of Safety, Major-General of Delaware Militia, and President (Governor) of Delaware during American Revolution. Born 1728, died 1784. Buried on his farm, “Poplar Grove.” Re-interred in Christ Church Yard 1887. — Map (db m39067) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Charles Inglis
In memory of 1734 Charles Inglis 1816 1759 Rector of this parish 1765 1787 Bishop of Nova Scotia 1816 First Colonial Bishop in the British Empire His wife Mary Vining and their two infant children rest in the churchyard. — Map (db m42757) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Colonel John Haslet
Presbyterian minister, later practiced medicine, Member of Colonial Assembly, Member of Council of Safety, 1775. Commanded First Delaware Militia Regiment. This regiment, reviewed in Dover, later joined Washington’s army and fought in Battles of Long Island and White Plains. It disbanded December, 1776. Haslet continuing with Washington’s army was killed Battle of Princeton, January 3, 1777. Buried First Presbyterian Churchyard, Philadelphia. Re-interred here 1841, when address was delivered by John M. Clayton. — Map (db m4716) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Commemoration Park
Dedicated on 13 September 1997 Constucted by 436th Civil Engineering Squadron — Map (db m51022) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Delaware State College
Established May 15, 1891, by an act of the Delaware General Assembly as the State College for Colored Students, by virtue of the 1890 Morrill Land-Grant Act under the provisions of the 1862 Morrill Act of Congress. Incorporated July 1, 1891. Reincorporated March 10, 1911. Name changed to Delaware State College in 1947. — Map (db m39054) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-34 — Dover
County seat since 1680. William Penn in 1683 ordered Town site laid out and named Dover. Plotted in 1717. Temporary capitol in 1777 and permanent capitol since 1779. Federal Constitution ratified here in 1787, making Delaware first State in Union. State Constitutional Convention held here in 1791-1792, 1831, 1852, and 1897. — Map (db m39061) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-35 — Dover
County seat since 1680. William Penn in 1683 ordered Town site laid out and named Dover. Plotted in 1717. Temporary capitol in 1777 and permanent capitol since 1779. Federal Constitution ratified here in 1787, making Delaware first State in Union. State Constitutional Convention held here in 1791-1792, 1831, 1852, and 1897. — Map (db m39107) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Dover
County seat since 1680. William Penn, in 1683, ordered townsite laid out and named Dover. Plotted in 1717. Temporary capital in 1777 and permanent capital since 1779. Federal Constitution ratified here in 1787 making Delaware First State in Union. State Constitutional Conventions held here in 1791-1792, 1831, 1852, and 1897. — Map (db m51115) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Dover Light InfantryKent County, Delaware Militia — 1776-1777
The Light Infantry Company of Dover, a part of the 1st Battalion of Kent County, mustered in on 2 April 1776. Each militia volunteer was uniformly armed, equipped, and wore a standard military coat of green faced with red lapels, cuffs, and collar. From 14 December 1776 to 14 January 1777, Captain Thomas Rodney, youngest brother to Declaration of Independence signer Caesar Rodney, and his light infantry company responded to General George Washington's Call to Arms for militia during . . . — Map (db m39576) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — East Dover Hundred
Originally part of St. Jones Hundred renamed Dover Hundred 1823, the boundaries being Little Creek on north and St. Jones Creek on south, extending from Delaware River to Maryland line. Dover Hundred was divided 1877 into two hundreds, called East Dover Hundred, and West Dover Hundred. — Map (db m51114) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-86 — Former Site of ILC DoverMakers of the Apollo Moonsuit
In 1947 the International Latex Corporation established a specialty products division and chose this site for its location. The company’s rise to prominence as a supplier of aeronautic and aerospace equipment began in 1952 when it was contracted to produce high altitude pressure helmets for the military. By the late 1950s the plant was producing pressure suits and developing prototype helmets for the space program. In 1962 the company was contracted to supply space suits for NASA’s Apollo Lunar . . . — Map (db m39062) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Hall HouseThe First State Heritage Park at Dover
The land on which Hall House stands was originally part of the Woodburn property. In 1885, Thomas Wilson, Jr. purchased an acre from his uncle living in Woodburn and built this house, which was completed in 1887. In 1983, during the administration of Governor Pierre S. du Pont IV, the State of Delaware purchased the house to expand guest and meeting facilities for Woodburn. (sidebar) The interior has three floors that include a vestibule, entrance hall, two parlors, dining . . . — Map (db m43736) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-68 — Hangar 1301
Constructed in 1944, Hangar 1301 served as the headquarters and engineering facility for the 4146th Base Unit from 1944 to 1946. Highly secret testing and development work was done here on air-launched rocket weapons. Aircraft used in testing ranged from P-47 Thunderbolts to four-engine bombers including B-17 Flying Fortresses and B-24 Liberators. Even single engine light planes were outfitted with multiple rocket launchers to test the feasibility of providing additional firepower for all types . . . — Map (db m50623) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Home of John Dickinson
"The Penman of the Revolution." Member of Delaware colonial and state assemblies. Member of Continental Congress, Annapolis Convention, and Philadelphia Federal Constitutional Convention. Signer for Delaware of Articles of Confederation and Federal Constitution. Governor of Delaware and President of Second Delaware Constitutional Convention. Born Maryland, 1732; died Wilmington, 1808. — Map (db m39583) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — In the Council Chamber of Elizabeth Battell's Golden Fleece Tavern
On this site, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States. December 7, 1787.

We, the deputies of the people of the Delaware state, in Convention met, having taken in our serious consideration the Federal Constitution proposed and agreed upon by the deputies of the United States in a General Convention held at the city of Philadelphia, on the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, have approved, . . . — Map (db m39074) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — John Bell House
The 18th-century front section of this structure is the oldest surviving wood building in Dover. It is being restored to serve as an interpretive center for the First State heritage Park.

The 20th-century rear additions will be removed to return the building to its 18th-century footprint. — Map (db m39097) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — John M. Clayton
Born in Dagsboro, Delaware, 1796. Graduate of Yale College 1815. Member of Delaware House of Representatives 1824. Secretary of State of Delaware 1826-1828. United States Senator 1829-1836, 1845-1849 and 1853 until his death, 1856. Chief Justice of Delaware 1837-1839. United States Secretary of State under Presidents Taylor and Fillmore, 1849 to July 9, 1850. Negotiated the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty with Great Britain. — Map (db m4748) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Kent County Courthouses (1680-1983)
Court was first held in Jones County in 1680. In 1682 William Penn changed the county’s name to Kent County. On August 11, 1863 William Penn directed that the town of Dover be laid out and that a courthouse be erected at the intersection of its two main streets. In 1697-1699 a courthouse was erected in accordance with Penn’s direction at the site of the present courthouse. A former courthouse had been ordered burned for its nails. The 1699 building was used until 1722 when it was sold for use . . . — Map (db m4156) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Legislative Hall - Delaware's Capitol Building
Legislative Hall was dedicated as the state's new capitol building in 1933, replacing The Old State House on The Green. The Senate and the House of Representatives of Delaware's General Assembly meets here. The building also houses the offices of the legislators and the formal office of the Governor. Murals depicting Delaware history, portrait galleries of Delaware's Governors and military heroes, as well as changing exhibits are on display.

The Delaware General Assembly 21 Senators are . . . — Map (db m39068) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Liberty Bell ReproductionDedicated to You, a Free Citizen in a Free Land
Dedicated to you, a free citizen in a free land, this reproduction of the Liberty Bell was presented to the people of Delaware by direction of The Honorable John W. Snyder, Secretary of the Treasury.

As the inspirational symbol of the United States Savings Bonds Independence Drive from May 15 to July 4, 1950, it was displayed in every part of this state.

The dimensions and tone are identical with those of the original Liberty Bell when it rang out our Independence in 1776. In standing . . . — Map (db m42759) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — K-60 — Loockerman Hall
In 1723 Nicholas Loockerman purchased 600 acres of land known as “The Range.” Following his death in 1771, the property passed to his grandson Vincent Loockerman Jr. Evidence suggests that he built the Georgian-style mansion known today as Loockerman Hall soon after inheriting the property. A member of the early Revolutionary-era Committee of Inspection, and County Militia, Vincent Loockerman Jr. died on April 5, 1790.

On August 24, 1891, 95 acres of the old plantation . . . — Map (db m39053) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — 72000277 — Loockerman House
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m39098) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Nicholas Ridgely
In this churchyard lie the remains of Nicholas Ridgely, Statesman and Jurist. Born in Dover, 1762, eldest son of Dr. Charles Greenbury Ridgely and Mary Wynkoop Ridgely. Member of State Convention which ratified the Federal Constitution, December 7, 1787. Repeatedly Member of General Assembly from 1788 until 1801. Attorney-General of Delaware, 1791-1801. Delegate to Second State Constitutional Convention, 1791-92. Chancellor of Delaware from 1801 until his death, 1830. — Map (db m39066) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — K-39 — Old Christ Church
Founded as mission by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in response to a petition from twenty-two inhabitants of Dover in 1703. The present church was erected in 1734. Among early missionaries here was the Rev. Charles Inglis, later first bishop of Nova Scotia. — Map (db m3803) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Old Presbyterian Church
Built 1790 during the pastorate of the Rev. John Miller to replace the earlier log church erected about 1715 on this plot designated as “Meeting House Square”. Presented by the Presbytery to the State of Delaware for a state museum in 1947. Restored in 1949 and 1950 by public subscriptions and with an appropriation from the 115th General Assembly approved by Hon. Elbert N. Carvel, Governor — Map (db m5048) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, Inc.Delaware Chapter One
Joseph S. Barbizzi, James C. Beuter, Cleyo E. Blanchard, Benjamin P. Bowings, George B. Buckalew, Sr., John J. Casey, Malcom T. Chandler, Casimir J. Chiczewski, Herbert D. Clifton, E. Hart Davis, James D. Davis, Joel W. Davis, Charles J. Donnelly, Donald R. Foster, Virgil R. Frazier, Melvin J. Gede, William G. Gibson, Ralph A. Giffing, William J. Greenfield, George M. Hammond, Sr., Kenneth H. Hartman, Charles B. Heite, Thad W. Hollis, Donald L. Hopkins, Frank G. Horn, Laurence J. Huber, Robert . . . — Map (db m50621) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Revolutionary War Patriot John Banning
Born in 1740 in Dover, Kent Co., DE Died Feb, 15, 1791 in Dover, Kent Co., DE Justice of the Peace Member of Joint Committee of Accounts, Committee of Correspondence, Council of Safety, and General Assembly. — Map (db m42754) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Richardson and Robbins Complex
The Richardson and Robbins complex began in 1881, twenty-six years after Alden B. Richardson and James W. Robbins started a small cannery at another location in Dover. On this new site Richardson and Robbins prospered as canners of high quality fruits, vegetables, meats and seafoods. Best known of these products were the "R and R" brand canned chickens and plum puddings. The success of the Richardson and Robbins Company is reflected in the succession of additions made to the original plant . . . — Map (db m42760) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Ridgely House
Dr. Charles Greenbury Ridgely: Member Colonial and State Legislative Assemblies; Delegate First State Constitutional Convention 1776.

Nicholas Ridgely (the younger): Member of Convention that ratified Federal Constitution 1787; Delegate Second State Constitutional Convention 1791-1792; Attorney General 1791-1801; Chancellor of Delaware 1801-1830.

Henry Moore Ridgely: Three times Secretary of State of Delaware; Representative in Congress 1811-1815; United States Senator . . . — Map (db m39071) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — K-70 — Site of Dover's First Methodist Church
In 1778, a Methodist Society was organized in Dover by Reverend Freeborn Garrettson. Desiring a permanent place of worship, members acquired a one-half acre lot at this location from Vincent Loockerman in 1782. Future Delaware Governor Richard Bassett contributed toward the construction of a forty foot square structure, which was named Wesley Chapel. Bishop Francis Asbury preached the first sermon here in 1784. The building was used until 1850, when a larger Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church . . . — Map (db m39065) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-94 — Site Of Kent County’s First Presbyterian Church
A Presbyterian Society, present in Kent from c1694, was organized and worshipped in a log church on this site from c1708 until 1791. The Presbytery of Philadelphia recognized its congregation in 1714. The present church was built in 1791 and served its congregation until 1924 when a new church was dedicated at State and Reed Street. The Chapel was added in 1880. Among the burials are Col. John Haslet, Commander of the Delaware Regiment, who was killed during the Battle of Princeton in 1777; . . . — Map (db m5166) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Site of King George’s Tavern
From 1724 known as King George’s Tavern. On its sign was painted King George’s portrait, supplanted during the revolution, by the portrait of George Washington. For many years the old hostelry was the meeting place for political rallies and used for gubernatorial receptions. — Map (db m3764) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — K-44 — St. Jones NeckSite of Settlement in the 1660's
This part of what is now Kent County, Delaware was one of the state's earliest sites of English colonization. Beginning in the 1660's plantations were established along the St. Jones River. The Dickinson family of Talbot County, Maryland was among the families who obtained early land patents in the area. Parts of "Merritts", "Whartons" and "Youngs" tracts were among the lands purchased by the Dickinsons with pounds of tobacco. — Map (db m39581) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — State House
Completed in 1792 and restored in 1976, it was shared by Kent County and the State from 1792 to 1873. Prior to the construction of this building, an older county court house stood on the same site. That small brick structure, about twenty five feet square, had been built in 1722. On July 29, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read from its porch for the first time to the people of Dover. The outline in the paving bricks behind you marks the location of that historic porch. The General Assembly moved to Legislative Hall in January, 1933. — Map (db m39073) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — T-33A Shooting Star
The two-seater T-33 was developed as a variant of Lockheed's P-80 fighter which had a high accident rate until more training with an onboard instructor reversed that trend. In service for over 50 years, the T-33, known as the Shooting Star of T-Bird, was used by the U.S. Air Force to train pilots already qualified to fly propeller-driven aircraft and as an advanced trainer.

In the early 1960s, the T-33 was replaced by the T-37 and T-38 Talon in the USAF's undergraduate pilot training . . . — Map (db m50626) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Bayonets of the Revolution
The Delaware Regiment fought in nearly every campaign of the American Revolution.

For a small state, Delaware's soldiers played a large role in the Revolution. Answering Congress' call, Delaware raised a regiment of 500-600 men by the summer of 1776. They first saw action at the battle of Long Island, fighting with distinction, and then received the post of honor covering the Continental Army's withdrawal across New Jersey. In January 1777, the regiment reorganized, with many veterans . . . — Map (db m39712) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-89 — The Capitol Theater
In 1904, the Dover Opera House opened at this location. The theater was built with funds from a public subscription, and included a stage that was used for a variety of purposes including vaudeville, photoplays, magic lantern shows, and in later years, motion pictures. In 1915, the theater carried the World Series between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Boston Red Sox live on stage. Lights were arranged to simulate a baseball diamond, and as plays took place, a telegrapher wired the action to . . . — Map (db m39104) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Compass Rose
First to ratify the Constitution of the United States. Delaware. The Compass Rose. Dedicated 7 December, 1988. — Map (db m3571) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Congressional Medal Of Honor
In Respectful Memory of Those Delawareans who have recieved The Congressional Medal Of Honor for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life and beyond the call of duty. —––    The Medal of Honor is the highest award that can be received by a member of the armed forces of the United States of America. It is given by the President in the name of Congress to individuals who, while serving in the armed forces, distinguished . . . — Map (db m61103) HM WM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Delaware Continentals
Liberty and Independence — Map (db m42671) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Delaware Line
To commemorate and also preserve to posterity the undying fame of the patriotism and valor of the officers and soldiers of the Delaware Line who, in May 1780 were reviewed on this green for the last time immediately prior to marching on their immortal southern campaign in the war of the American Revolution and from which campaign but few survived to return to their native state this monument is erected by the Delaware State Society of the Cincinnati and the patriotic citizens of Delaware May 30, A. D. 1912. — Map (db m3684) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The Delaware Regiment
On December 9, 1775, the Continental Congress resolved that a body of troops be raised in Delaware "for the defense of American liberty." Commanded by Colonel John Haslet, the Delaware Regiment consisted of more than 500 battle-ready troops when they marched northward to join the Continental Army in August, 1776. After expiration of enlistments and Haslet's death, the Regiment was reorganized in the winter of 1776-1777 under the leadership of Colonel David Hall. Forced to endure great hardship, . . . — Map (db m67456) HM WM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The First State Heritage Park of Dover
The First State Heritage Park of Dover is Delaware’s first urban “park without boundaries.” It includes the many historical and cultural attractions within Dover’s historical districts. Linking the diverse sites throughout Delaware’s capital city, the park paints a comprehensive picture of the heritage of Dover and the State of Delaware. Legislative Hall, the capitol building for the State of Delaware. Before you stands Legislative Hall, the capitol building . . . — Map (db m3557) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — The First State Heritage Park of Dover
The First State Heritage Park of Dover is Delaware’s first urban “park without boundaries.” It includes the many historical and cultural attractions within Dover’s historical districts. Linking the diverse sites throughout Delaware’s capital city, the park paints a comprehensive picture of the heritage of Dover and the State of Delaware. Legislative Hall, the capitol building for the State of Delaware. Before you stands Legislative Hall, the capitol building . . . — Map (db m3560) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-76 — The Golden Fleece TavernBirthplace of the First State
This was the site of the Golden Fleece Tavern, scene of some of the most important and dramatic events in Delaware history. Built in the 1730s, the Golden Fleece was a center for community and government activities. It was a place of great importance during the American Revolution and the early years of our Nation’s Independence. Also known as Battell’s Tavern, it hosted the meetings of the Committee of Inspection and Observation, and was a vital point for the exchange of wartime . . . — Map (db m39075) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Thomas Stevenson House
The brick house was built in 1846. The structures to the rear consist of three separate buildings dating from 1804. They are the original tenement and two outbuildings. The first was a summer kitchen and the latter, Sara Stevenson's (1850) two room schoolhouse. — Map (db m39099) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Timothy Hanson Housec. 1730
The Timothy Hanson House stood on this site until it was relocated in 2006. The front of the building, commissioned by the Delaware Association of REALTORS, for its headquarters in 2006, is a replica of the structure known as the Hanson house. The dwelling is believed to have been moved here after 1837. Moving structures was a common practice at that time due to the high cost of material. It is possible that Timothy Hanson owned the structure before it was moved, but no record of the arrival of . . . — Map (db m39096) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Vietnam MemorialFallen Heroes
Robert P. Archer Jr., Donald Ray Bailey, Paul L. Berry, Bruch E. Clough, Toby Ernest Collins, George H. Coppage, III, George W. Cripps, Clifton Cubbage, Bruce E. Dolbow, Robert H. Donaway, Harold W. Haddick, Jan Victor Henrickson, Lawrence E. Hitchens, Graham Norris Lowdon, Jr., Donald R. Hoskins, Wayne C. Jester, James H. Johnson, Jr., Donald E. Kenton, William L. Lowman, John M. Martin, Paul Oswald Meder, Abraham L. Moore, William L. Nellans, Alexander J. Palenscar, III, Larry F. Potts, Nolan . . . — Map (db m51117) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-71 — Wesley College
Wesley College is a private, liberal arts college affiliated with the United Methodist Church. It was founded in 1873 as Wilmington Conference Academy, a preparatory school for boys under the patronage of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Female students were admitted the following year. Post-secondary education was added in 1917. The school was called Wesley Collegiate Institute, offering the first two years of college. Renamed Wesley Junior College in 1941, it has been known as Wesley College . . . — Map (db m39063) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — KC-79 — Wesley United Methodist Church
The origin of this congregation can be traced to the establishment of a Methodist society in Dover in 1778. Land on North Street was obtained in 1782, and a brick chapel was completed there in 1784. Bishops Francis Asbury and Richard Whatcoat, pioneers of American Methodism, often conducted services there. Needing more space, the present site was purchased for a new church. The cornerstone was laid on September 23, 1850, and the building was dedicated the following February. To accommodate . . . — Map (db m39100) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Woodburn
Part of a tract of 3,000 acres granted to John Hillyard by William Penn, March 7, 1683. His great-grandson, Charles Hillyard, built this mansion and resided here with his wife, Mary, daughter of William Killen, first Chancellor of Delaware. According to tradition, here culminated Patty Cannon's raid on Dover, vividly portrayed in George Alfred Townsend's historical novel "The Entailed Hat." — Map (db m42761) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — Woodburn: The Governor's House
This house was built for Charles Hillyard III ca. 1798. At the time, it was considered one of the grandest in Kent County. When Hillyard died in 1814, his son-in-law, Dr. Martin W. Bates purchased the house. Bates lived here with his wife Mary and her three younger sisters. The house was sold to Daniel and Mary Cowgill in 1825. The first known reference to the name "Woodburn" was in an 1845 letter written by a Cowgill family member. Before there was an official residence, Governors who did not . . . — Map (db m42796) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Dover — World War II Memorial
1941 - 1945 Dedicated to the enduring memory of those of this community who gave their lives in World War II that we might achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.

In Memoriam W. Kirk Baynard, Ralph H. Bennett, E. Clayton Boggs, Alice L. Brittingham, George H. Bullock, Robert J. Burger, Edward S. Collins, John N. Compton, Jr., Julian A. Courtney, Oscar B. Dean, Louis A. Drexler, Jr., William C. Fox, Melvin A. Geiger, Thomas M. Gooden, III, . . . — Map (db m50622) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Felton — Captain Jonathan Caldwell
This farm, formerly known as Burberry's Berry, was home of Captain Jonathan Caldwell of Colonel Haslet's Regiment in Revolution. Tradition says Delaware soldiers received name "Blue Hen's Chickens" from Caldwell's men having with tem game chickens, celebrated in Kent County for their famous fighting qalities, the brood of a certain blue hen. — Map (db m39608) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Felton — KC-57 — Geographic Center of Delaware
In 1989, a curious seventh grader from the Caesar Rodney School District asked where the center of Delaware was located. With the help of his teacher and the Kent County Department of Planning, it was determined that the geographic center of the state was located approximately eleven miles south of Dover in the field just south of this marker, on the Killen Farm. — Map (db m39607) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Felton — K-54 — Town of Felton
The town of Felton was laid out in 1856 when the Delaware Railroad reached this area. Located between Berrytown to the west and Johnny Cake Landing (Frederica) to the east, the town became a “whistle” stop on the new railroad line. Owing its existence to the railroad, Felton was named in honor of Samuel M. Felton, President of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad and a major force in bringing railroad service to central and southern Delaware. Incorporated on February . . . — Map (db m39606) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Frederica — Barratt's Chapel(Cradle of Methodism in America)
Erected on land deeded by Col.Philip Barratt, August, 1780. Here Thomas Coke, D.D., representative of John Wesley, preached November 14, 1784, administering the Sacrament of Holy Communion for first time by a Methodist America. With Francis Asbury planned organization of Methodist Episcopal Church calling first conference to meet at Baltimore, December 24, 1784. — Map (db m39610) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Frederica — KC-93 — Barratt's Chapel
In 1778 a Methodist Society was organized in this area by Freeborn Garrettson. Desiring a permanent place of worship, the group constructed a brick “preaching house” at his location in 1780. The site was provided by Society member Phillip Barratt, and the building was named in his honor. On November 14, 1784, a large crowd gathered here for Quarterly Meeting. The sermon was given by Dr. Thomas Coke, who had recently arrived from England with directions from Methodist founder John . . . — Map (db m39612) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Harrington — KC-47 — Clark's Corner
On September 17, 1740, Thomas Clark received a Proprieary Warrant from Thomas Penn for lands “adjoining his dwellin place” which he named “Clark’s Folly.” By the 1790’s Benjamin Clark and his son Matthew had established an inn and tavern on this land at a location which became known as Clark’s Corner. A mill, store, and blacksmith’s shop were located nearby. This was an important stop for travelers. A post office was established here in 1857. On January . . . — Map (db m37477) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Harrington — K-61 — First Rural Free Delivery Route
For many years the National Grange and other organizations interested in the welfare of citizens residing in rural areas advocated the establishment of rural free delivery of mail. In October 1896, the Post Office Department introduced experimental rural delivery in West Virginia. The new service was favorably received, and by June of the following year there were forty-four routes in operation in twenty-nine states. On October 3, 1898, rural free delivery of mail in Delaware was initiated . . . — Map (db m37476) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Harrington — K 49 — Harrington
Formerly known as Clark’s Corner, the roots of this community can be traced to settlement by the Clark family in the 1730’s and the subsequent establishment of an inn, tavern, store, and mill nearby. The village was little more than a country crossroads before the coming to the railroad in 1856. In that same year Matthew J. Clark subdivided a portion of his lands into town lots which would form the nucleus of the growing community. In 1859 the state legislature renamed the . . . — Map (db m36916) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Hartly — KC-97 — Cheney Clow's Rebellion
During the American Revolution many Delawareans remained loyal to the British Crown. In 1778 a group of Loyalists under the leadership of local resident Cheney Clow constructed a fort near this location. Concerned that they would march on Dover, a detachments of Delaware militia commanded by Lt. Col. Charles Pope was sent to investigate. Arriving on April 14, the party exchanged fire with the fort's occupants. Returning two days later with reinforcements, Pope found the post abandoned and . . . — Map (db m39715) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Houston — KC-109 — Griffith's ChapelWilliamsville Methodist Church
When Methodism first came to this area in the late 18th century, residents worshipped in local homes and journeyed to nearby towns to attend services. On November 20, 1848 William and Sarah Griffith conveyed land at this location to Trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church to build "thereon a church or place of worship". Construction was completed circa 1850, and the building was named in their honor. The chapel is a well-preserved example of a mid-nineteenth century, rural Methodist meeting . . . — Map (db m38620) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Kenton — KC-66 — Town of Kenton
The origin of this community can be traced to the mid-18th century, when growing travel between Dover and the head of the Chester River resulted in the establishment of a Public House here to support the needs of travelers. Increasing commerce led to the growth of settlement. First known as Grog-Town and Lewis’ Cross Roads, the village was formally named Kenton in 1806.

A post office was established here in 1857. With the arrival of the Maryland and Delaware Railroad following the . . . — Map (db m39052) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Kitts Hummock — KC-80 — Kitts Hummock
Like the Native Americans before them, European settlers used this rising ground or "hummock" on the shore of the Delaware Bay as a place for fishing and recreation. In 1738, Jehu Curtis received a patent for lands that he called "Kitt's Hammock." By the early 1800s, the Pleasanton family had established a tavern here for the entertainment of visitors. Around 1846, a hotel was built nearby. Known for a time as the Bay View Hotel, it was long the center of local activities. In the latter decades . . . — Map (db m39578) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Little Creek — Old Stone TavernThough Never a Tavern, it was Built of Stone
Stone is a rare material on this coastal plain, so when you find three stone buildings in one small area, there has to be a reason. The reason is that the same person, Manlove Hayes, built them all. Hayes built the house now known as the Stone Tavern some time before 1829 for Henry Bell, whose family had owned the lot since the mid-18th century. Hayes, who ran the shipping industry in Little Creek, is also credited with building the two other stone buildings: the Octagonal Schoolhouse, which . . . — Map (db m50628) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Magnolia — KC-90 — Murderkill/Motherkiln Friends Meeting
Quakers were gathering for worship in this area by 1712, when members of the Religious Society of Friends met "at the widow Needham's at Murderkill Creek." Established as Motherkiln Preparative Meeting (under the care of Duck Creek Meeting), the group probably met in the homes of its members until a meetinghouse was constructed at this site, circa 1760, on land donated by William Jackson. The structure was burned soon thereafter, and for a time Friends debated relocating the Meeting to a site . . . — Map (db m39459) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Magnolia — KC-91 — Warner Mifflin1745 - 1798
A native of Virginia's Eastern Shore, Mifflin came to Delaware as a young man. Born into a slaveholding Quaker family, he manumitted his own slaves in 1774-75 and later became one of America's foremost abolitionists of the 18th century. As an elder of the Religious Society of Friends, he traveled extensively to convince others to free their slaves as well. He addressed the legislatures of several states and presented numerous petitions and memorials to the United States Congress opposing . . . — Map (db m39456) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Marydel — KC-69 — Mason-Dixon Crownstone
Responsible for marking the boundaries of Maryland and Pennsylvania (including the "Three Lower Counties" of Delaware), Mason and Dixon began their survey of the North-South or Tangent Line at the southwestern corner of present-day Delaware in June 1764. Proceeding northward, they arrived here on July 30, forty-five miles from their starting point. They later returned to replace temporary markers with stones imported from England. Mile point stones bore the letters P and M. At five-mile points . . . — Map (db m37052) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Marydel — West Dover Hundred
Originally part of St. Jones Hundred, renamed Dover Hundred 1823, the boundaries being Little Creek on the north and St. Jones Creek on the south, extending from Delaware River to Maryland Line. Dover Hundred was divided 1877 into two Hundreds, called West Dover Hundred and East Dover Hundred. — Map (db m74137) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Milford — KC-111 — Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church
It is believed that parishioners of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church were worshiping in a private residence on North Street by 1859. The church eventually moved to a site on Church Street to accommodate the growing congregation. On March 2, 1895 Bethel AME Church was formally incorporated. In April of the same year, a lot was acquired on Fourth Street from Amelia Brinkley and a house of worship was built. A second building on Church Street, for use as a parsonage, was conveyed to the . . . — Map (db m69034) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Milford — KC-101 — Christ ChurchMispillion Milford
Christ Church Mispillion was the second parish in Delaware established by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. The Rev. Thomas Crawford first held services of the Church of England in lower Kent County in 1704. The previous church was located at Church Hill about three miles west of Milford. The Rev. Sydenham Thorne, the first resident rector, was instrumental in the relocation of the church to the new town of Milford. Construction of the church in Milford was started . . . — Map (db m69033) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Milford — K 29 — Milford
Town laid out by Joseph Oliver 1787. Village was located on tract then called “Saw-Mill Range.” Named Milford from fording place near mill-dam erected by Rev. Sydenham Thorne across Mispillion Creek, 1787. First incorporated 1807. Old town in Kent County, new town in Sussex County. Home of Governors Tharp Causey, Burton and Watson. — Map (db m36909) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Milford — KC 28 — Milford
Town laid out by Joseph Oliver 1787. Village was located on tract then called “Saw-Mill Range.” Named Milford from fording place near mill-dam erected by Rev. Sydenham Thorne across Mispillion Creek, 1787. First incorporated 1807. Old town in Kent County, new town in Sussex County. Home of Governors Rogers,Tharp Causey, Burton and Watson. — Map (db m36950) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Milford — KC-92 — Parson Thorne Mansion(Silver Hill)
This historic building lies within a 1,750 acre Duke of York land patent called Saw Mill Range granted to Henry Bowman in 1680. The first known resident of this portion of the tract was Joseph Booth, who purchased 510 acres from the Bowman family in 1730. The center brick section of the present structure was built by John Cullen after his purchase of 263 acres in 1746. Reverend Syndenham Thorne, an Episcopal clergyman who was instrumental in Milford’s development, bought the . . . — Map (db m37393) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Milford — KC-65 — Site of Milford's First Methodist Church
The beginning of Methodism in this community can be traced to the organization of a local “society” in 1777. Early meetings were held in the homes of its members. On December 3, 1787, Joseph Oliver conveyed a lot of ground at this location for the purpose of “building a preaching house or church” for the Methodists. A frame chapel was constructed here and completed in 1790. The growth and prosperity of the congregation resulted in the construction of an . . . — Map (db m36888) HM
Delaware (Kent County), near Greenwood — K-61 — Todd's Chapel United Methodist Church
   The origin of this congregation can be traced to the days of the American Revolution, when Methodist pioneers such as Francis Asbury and Freeborn Garrettson traveled throughout this area organizing groups or “societies” for worship. Many of the early meetings were held at the homes of members such as local resident Levin Todd. On March 6, 1803, Todd and other representatives of the local society purchased land at this location from Olive and Mary Jump to serve . . . — Map (db m60461) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smryna — The Delaware House
N. Main & Mt. Vernon Street c. 1817 National Register of Historic Places of the Smyrna Historic District — Map (db m39676) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-67 — "First in the World"Post # 14 American Legion Ambulance Service
In 1924, the members of the David C. Harrison American Legion Post # 14 initiated the first American Legion ambulance service in the world. Its eighteen founding members were veterans of World War I who volunteered their time to transport the sick and injured to hospitals in Wilmington, Dover, Milford, and beyond. Prior to this time, persons needing medical assistance were transported by train. This practice was often time-consuming and thereby dangerous to patients who were seriously ill and . . . — Map (db m39026) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — Allee House
In 1706 John Allee, of a Huguenot family, bought a 600-acre tract, "Woodstock Bower," of which this land is a part. One of his sons, Abraham, was prominent in Kent County affairs until his death in 1776: Member of the General Assembly 1726, Justice of the Peace 1738, Chief Ranger of Kent County 1749. This house was built about 1753, probably by Abraham. In 1963 the U.S. Government leased the house to the State of Delaware for preservation as a fine example of early Delaware "Plantation" Architecture. — Map (db m39589) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — Commodore Jacob Jones
Born 1768, near this site. Commanded U.S. Sloop Wasp in notable victory over superior British sloop Frolic, October, 1812, off Cape Hatteras. Commanded frigate Constitution 1818-1829. Died August, 1850. Buried at Cecilton, Maryland. Reinterred in Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery, with distinguished honors. — Map (db m39031) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-60 — Home of Allen McLane
For many years this home was the property of Colonel Allen McLane, statesman and hero of the American Revolution.

Born in Philadelphia August 8, 1746, McLane had moved to Delaware by 1769. His military career began when he was commissioned as an officer in the state militia in 1775. After the outbreak of the Revolution, McLane volunteered to raise a company of troops, investing much of his inheritance in accompanying expenses. During the course of the war he was an active . . . — Map (db m39028) HM

Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-78 — Sgt. John B. MaberryMedal of Honor Recipient
Born December 17, 1841, John B. Maberry was the son of John and Temperance Brockson Maberry of Duck Creek Hundred. Responding to the call of his country, he enlisted in the Union Army’s Company F, First Regiment, Delaware Infantry Volunteers, in August 1861. Actively engaged in many of the major campaigns of the war, the 1st Delaware earned honors and accolades for its outstanding service and military discipline. On July 3, 1863, during the final day of the Battle of Gettysburg, the regiment . . . — Map (db m39024) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-81 — Site of Duck Creek Presbyterian Church
In 1733 a charter was granted to “a dissenting congregation” of Scots and Irish Presbyterians who had settled in this area. A Meeting House was subsequently erected at this location. The Reverend Thomas Evans conducted the first service here on August 12, 1733. The tract, then known as Holy Hill, was formally conveyed to church trustees in 1749. On June 30, 1776, the Reverend John Miller summoned the large number of Patriots in the congregation to support the American Revolution. . . . — Map (db m39032) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-84 — Site of Green Pottery
In 1764, Thomas Green sold a one-quarter acre lot at this location to his grandson, Charles Green. Some time thereafter, Charles established a facility for the manufacturing of redware pottery on this site. The business is known to have been in operation by the 1780s. Redware is made from clay with high amounts of iron oxide, giving a brick red color to the finished product. Archaeological evidence indicates that the producers of this pottery included cups, mugs, bowls, plates, pitchers, jugs, . . . — Map (db m39678) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — Site of Old Asbury Methodist Church
The roots of Methodism in this community can be traced to the organization of a local “society” in the 1770’s. Meetings were held in private homes before a frame structure was built here circa 1786 on land provided by Col. Allan McLane, Revolutionary War hero and early advocate of Methodism. On May 9, 1799, the meeting house and burial ground were formally conveyed to the church trustees for 5 shillings. The Philadelphia Annual Conference was held here on numerous occasions in the . . . — Map (db m39027) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — Site of the Duck Creek Society of Friends
The first religious organization to hold services in Duck Creek Hundred - 1705. Property transferred to Duck Creek Historical Society - 1962. Michael Desmond, Jr's Eagle Scout Restoration Project - 2002. — Map (db m39711) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-71 — Smyrna Opera House and Old Town Hall
In the spring of 1869, the Commissioners of Smyrna approved a plan to erect a Town Hall. Responding to the long-held desire of the citizens for a venue for public gatherings, architect Richard Mitchell designed the building to include a “hall” on the second floor. Ground was broken on July 15, 1869, and the building was opened the following spring. For many years it was the center of the community’s civic and social activities. Often attracting large crowds from long distances, the . . . — Map (db m39030) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — KC-85 — The Barracks
This longtime Smyrna landmark was constructed by Robert Holliday in the late 18th century. The first known residents of the home are believed to have been the family of his daughter, Susannah Holliday Wilson. The origin of the name “The Barracks” is uncertain, but records confirm that it was known as such from an early date. After being sold by the Wilson family in 1818, the property changed ownership on several occasions during the following four decades. One owner of note was . . . — Map (db m39029) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — The Gray Box Chateau
The Gray Box Chateau 24 North Main Street Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior 1764 — Map (db m39679) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Smyrna — The John Cummins Mansion
The John Cummins Mansion has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior - May 23, 1980 — Map (db m39677) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Viola — K-15 — North Murderkill Hundred
Formerly part of Murderkill Hundred, originally called Motherkill Hundred, kill meaning creek in Dutch. Original boundaries were St. Jones Creek on north, and Murderkill Creek on south, extending from Delaware River to Maryland line. In 1867, Murderkill Hundred was divided into two hundreds named North Murderkill Hundred and South Murderkill Hundred. — Map (db m51113) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Wyoming — KC-99 — Coming of the Railroad
Efforts to establish rail transportation in Delaware were realized in 1832 with the completion of the New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad connecting shipping traffic on the Chesapeake Bay and Delaware River. The promise of railroads was clearly demonstrated, and in 1836 the General Assembly chartered the Delaware Railroad for the purpose of building a line from a junction with the New Castle and Frenchtown to the southern border of the state. Due to poor economic conditions construction was . . . — Map (db m39604) HM
Delaware (Kent County), Wyoming — KC-63 — Town of Wyoming
The construction of the Delaware Railroad in the 1850s led to the establishment of the Delmarva Peninsula’s first and most important north-south railway transportation artery. Proximity to the nearby community of Camden resulted in the location of a station here when the railroad arrived in 1856. Settlement of “West Camden” quickly expanded with the construction of homes and businesses. In 1865 the Rev. John J. Pierce migrated here from the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania. Rev. . . . — Map (db m39603) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Bear — NC-126 — Sgt. James P. Connor Memorial Circle
Born in Wilmington, Delaware, on January 12, 1919, James P. Connor entered the U.S. Army in January 1941. As a member of the 7th Infantry, 3rd Division, he was a participant in the amphibious landing at Cape Cavalaire in southern France. On August 15, 1944, Sgt. Connor was assigned to a battle patrol whose mission was to destroy enemy fortifications that threatened the troops that were coming ashore. Seriously wounded by a mine that killed his platoon lieutenant, Sgt. Connor refused medical aid . . . — Map (db m10700) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Christiana — NC-173 — Christiana Presbyterian Church
Known in its early days as the "Presbyterian Church at Christiana Bridge," this congregation was organized in the 1730s. A church structure was built on this site soon after and a graveyard was established by the mid-18th century. Rev. Charles Tennant served as the first minister of the church, and the prominent English evangelist George Whitefield, a friend of the Tennant family, reportedly preached to a large gathering near this church in the late 1730s. Formally incorporated on July 29, . . . — Map (db m14752) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Christiana — NC-98 — Christiana United Methodist Church
The origin of this congregation may be traced to the earliest days of Methodism in America. In March, 1771, Joseph Pilmore, one of the first Methodist missionaries from England, preached outdoors at Christiana. Upon returning in 1773, Reverend Pilmore noted the enthusiastic response of local residents to the message and philosophy of church founder John Wesley. As a result of these early efforts, a "Society" of local Methodists was organized. Many of the first meetings were held in the homes of . . . — Map (db m13553) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Christiana — NC-184 — Old Fort Union American Methodist Episcopal Church
In 1813 a group of African-American Methodists led by Peter Spencer formed an independent denomination that came to be known as the African Union Church. It was the first incorporated religious body in the United States controlled entirely by African Americans. Early meetings of the Christiana Bridge congregation were likely held at private residences until 1850, when a brick structure was built for worship. In 1854 the group was formally incorporated as the African Union Church of Christiana . . . — Map (db m13554) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Christiana — N.C. 52 — Samuel Patterson
Operated flour mill one-fourth mile south. Was captain in French and Indian War. In American Revolution was member of Boston Relief Committee, colonel of Delaware battalion of famous "Flying Camp," Brigadier General of Delaware militia and first treasurer of Delaware State. Died 1785. Buried in Presbyterian Cemetery at Christiana. — Map (db m67210) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Christiana — Talbot's Fort
Colonel George Talbot , cousin of Lord Baltimore, in defiance of William Penn's claim to Delaware,erected a fort nearby, 1684, on land of the Widow Ogle. Talbot dispossessed settlers between here and Iron Hill who refused to acknowledge Baltimore as proprietor. Fort garrisoned about two years boundary settled by agreement 1760. Surveyed by Mason and Dixon 1763. Confirmed by proclamation of the Provincial Governor, John Penn 1775. — Map (db m60040) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Claymont — NC-176 — Archmere
This was once the home of John Jakob Raskob (1879-1950), financier, DuPont and General Motors executive, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and developer of the Empire State Building. Known as "The Patio," his palatial home was constructed 1916-18 in a style befitting his position in Wilmington society. The name "Archmere" was given to the surrounding estate because of the natural arch the trees formed over the Delaware River vista. This has been home to Archmere Academy since its . . . — Map (db m14697) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Claymont — NC-123 — Church of the Ascension
The roots of this congregation can be traced to 1843 and the missionary efforts of the Rev. Greenbury W. Ridgely and the Rt. Rev. Alfred Lee, who conducted services every other Sunday in the Claymont Stone School. The church was accepted into the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware as an organized congregation on May 28, 1851. The Rev. Ridgely was elected the first Rector. The first church was erected on property donated by the Rev. John B. Clemson, on the corner of Church Lane and Philadelphia Pike. . . . — Map (db m14700) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Claymont — NC-105 — Claymont Stone School
Also known as Naaman's Creek School No. 1, THE CLAYMONT STONE SCHOOL was built on land donated by John Dickinson, the "Penman of the American Revolution," in 1805. The building was expanded and renovated in 1905. Evidence suggests that it may have been the first racially integrated public school in the State. The Claymont Stone School was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. — Map (db m14699) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Claymont — NC-99 — Old Claymont High School
Constructed 1924-25. Also known as the Green Street School. Prominent in United States history as the first public high school in the 17 segregated states to be legally integrated. In January 1951, eight black students applied for admission. Due to the “separate but equal” education system in place at that time, the Claymont Board of Education was unable to permit their entry. In July 1951, noted civil rights attorney Louis L. Redding of Wilmington filed a civil action suit . . . — Map (db m14705) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Claymont — NC-160 — Robinson House
The oldest portion of this structure is believed to have been built circa 1730. In the 1740s the house and surrounding property were sold to Philadelphia merchant Thomas Robinson. Other holdings included a milling operation and landing on nearby Naaman’s Creek. Following Thomas Robinson’s death the house passed to his son and namesake. Commissioned as a Pennsylvania Continental Army officer at the outset of the Revolution, the younger Thomas rose to the rank of Lt. Colonel, serving with . . . — Map (db m14704) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Claymont — NC-91 — The Darley House
The home of world-renowned illustrator Felix O.C. Darley (1822-1888). Built in the late 18th century and enlarged several times during the first half of the 19th century, the house was purchased by Darley in 1863 and renamed "The Wren's Nest." During his career, Darley illustrated books for Washington Irving, Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Charles Dickens and James Fenimore Cooper. Two of his most notable works were Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle. . . . — Map (db m14137) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — Batteries Hentig and DoddThe 1890s modernization continued
By the turn of the century, Fort Delaware had become part of a coastal defense system, linking Fort Mott in New Jersey and Fort Dupont in Delaware. Batteries* Hentig and Dodd, which each housed two rapid-fire guns, were intended to furnish close-range support for the submerged electric cables and torpedo net. Both batteries were named in honor of army officers who had died in action. ---------- * battery – two or more pieces of artillery used together. — Map (db m21662) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — NC-100 — Christ Episcopal ChurchDelaware City
In 1847, the Reverend Andrew F. Freeman and the Reverend Thomas F. Billop were appointed as a committee to organize and solicit subscriptions for a Protestant Episcopal church in Delaware City. The parish was formally organized on May 28, 1848, when Bishop Alfred Lee officiated for the first time to a numerous congregation assembled in the Methodist Church. The church was officially admitted into full union at the following Diocesan Convention. A house of worship was provided by the . . . — Map (db m10208) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — NC-97 — Delaware City School No. 118C
In 1919 Delaware radically altered its state school system, opening a new era in the education of African-American youth. Progress was stimulated by the efforts of the Delaware School Auxiliary Association and its primary supporter, P.S. duPont, who conducted a statewide effort to replace outdated and overcrowded facilities. On March 9, 1922 the State received the deed for a new building to replace a school located in the Polktown section of the community. the facility housed grades 1 through . . . — Map (db m10445) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — Delaware Historic Civil Engineering Landmark
Chesapeake & Delaware Canal Designated 1982, Delaware Section, ASCE — Map (db m10204) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — Pea Patch Island
Fort Delaware is located on Pea Patch Island in the Delaware River. The island is sometimes said to have gotten its name from a boat loaded with peas that ran aground on a mud shoal in the 1770s. The spilled peas sprouted, mud caught in the vines, and so the island grew. In 1794, the island appeared on a map from the first time. During the Civil War, Pea Patch Island was only about 75 acres in size (compared with almost 300 acres today). Earth dredged up from the river was dumped onto the . . . — Map (db m21589) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — Sally Port
In its original state, heavy iron-studded oak doors (like the one before you) stood at both ends of the sally port. Large granite blocks, quarried in Quincy, Massachusetts, line its walls. A sample of the fort’s fine brickwork can be seen on the ceiling. Note the mortar mixture of oyster shells and horsehair which has survived intact as a result of this protected location. — Map (db m21665) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — The Diving Bell
Made in Philadelphia 1839 for the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company, it was used as an air chamber for workmen to make underwater repairs on the lock gates. The canal was opened in 1829 and was operated until the sea level canal was opened at Reedy Point in 1927. This diving bell as restored in 1961 by the Delaware City Community Park District. — Map (db m10201) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Delaware City — W. Emerson Wilson1908 - 1982
In Memory of W. Emerson Wilson 1908 - 1982 Through his leadership Pea Patch Island was returned to the State of Delaware by the Federal Government in 1948. He was the founder and first president of the Fort Delaware Society, January 1950 and was elected chairman of the board in 1956. — Map (db m10207) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Elsmere — NC-199 — The "Annie Oakleys": First Female Prison Guards in the United States
Completed in 1901, the New Castle County Workhouse at Greenbank was named the first penal institution in the United States to employ armed female guards. Nicknamed "Annie Oakleys" for their excellent shooting ability with the machine guns and rifles they carried, the women were first introduced to the Workhouse in 1943 as a solution to the loss of many male guards due to the war effort. the original group of four guards was expanded to eleven after the experiment was deemed a success. They were . . . — Map (db m74277) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Glasgow — NC-142 — Aiken's Tavern Historic District
In the years prior to the Revolutionary War, John Aiken commenced the operation of a tavern and storehouse at this location near the intersection of two of the major roadways of the Delmarva Peninsula. Aided by their proximity to this important crossroads, Aiken's businesses prospered and a small village was established as a result. Variously known as Aiken's Tavern, or Aiken Town, the community became known as Glasgow in the early 19th century. In 1977, the Aiken's Tavern Historic District was . . . — Map (db m39592) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Greenville — NC-78 — Camp Brandywine
In the Civil War the first camp of this name was at Wilmington Fair Grounds for the First and Second Delaware Regiments. The same name was given this site in September 1862 for a camp of Pennsylvania troops sent to guard powder mills. They were relieved by the Fourth Delaware Regiment the next month when the site was known briefly as Camp duPont then later as Camp Brandywine. — Map (db m45573) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Hockessin — Ashland BridgeRed Clay Creek — Listed on National Register of Historic Places – 1973
Original Town Lattice Truss Covered Bridge – ca. 1850 Bridge Deck Rehabilitated – 1964 Listed on National Register of Historic Places – 1973 Complete Rehabilitation & Steel Beams Added – 1982 Rehabilitated Stone Foundation and Replaced Timber Roof, Siding and Deck – 2008 —————— • —————— Engineering & Project Management – Delaware DOT General Contractor – Eastern . . . — Map (db m62043) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Hockessin — St. Mary's Church
Site of the first Catholic church in Delaware, Usually called "Coffee Run" Church. Land purchased 1772 by Rev. Matthias Manners. First church erected shortly thereafter. Last church erected by Rev. Patrick Kenny. Remained standing until 1908. Services discontinued in 1884 upon erection of churches at Hockessin and Ashland. — Map (db m43694) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Hockessin — Wooddale BridgeRed Clay Creek
Original Town Lattice Truss Covered Bridge - ca. 1850 Rehabilitated - 1939 Steel Beams Added - 1981 Destroyed by Flood/ Steel Acrow Bridge Placed - 2003 Town Lattice Truss Covered Bridge Replacement - 2008 Engineering & Project Management - Delaware DOT General Contractor - Mumford and Miller Concrete, Inc. Timber Framing - Pocopson Industries, Inc. Stone Mason - Stonescapes, Inc. This bridge is dedicated to the residents of the Wooddale and the local community, whose involvement and support made this project possible. — Map (db m73000) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — NC-16 — Commodore Thomas Macdonough
Early home of Commodore Thomas Macdonough. Hero of Battle of Lake Champlain 1814. Born 1783. Died 1825. Commodore 1813. Assisted Commodore Decatur in capturing and burning the "Philadelphia" off the coast of Tripoli, 1804. Original name of village "The Trap," changed to "Macdonough" 1814. His parents lie in old burying ground nearby. — Map (db m10305) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — NC-135 — Locust GroveHome of Governor Joshua Clayton
This home was once the residence of Joshua Clayton (1744-1798), an eminent physician and distinguished government leader in post-Revolutionary Delaware. After attending the University of Pennsylvania he established a successful local practice and was later one of the founders of the Medical Society of Delaware. At the outset of the Revolution he was commissioned as an officer in the Bohemia Manor Militia. Clayton's career as a statesman began with his election to the Delaware House of Assembly . . . — Map (db m10699) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — NC-118 — Middletown
Beginning in the 1690s, settler Adam Peterson and his family acquired several tracts of land here. One tract, surveyed in 1733 was given the name "Middletown." The origin of the name is believed to derive from the area's location at the middle point of a road that led from the head of the Bohemia River to the banks of Appoquinimink Creek. Located at the intersection of this road was the busy King's Highway, this crossroads was an important stop for travelers by the mid-18th century. A tavern . . . — Map (db m10613) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — NC-144 — Middletown Academy
In 1824 area residents petitioned the General Assembly for a lottery to erect a building for education and public worship. Construction of the Academy began in 1826 and was completed the next year. For many years the building served as the center of community activities. Previously a private institution, it became a part of the public school system in 1876. The school was closed in 1929. The building was deeded in 1945 to the St. Georges Hundred Historical Society, an organization formed to . . . — Map (db m10612) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — Old St. Anne's(P. E. Church)
As early as 1705 a log chapel was established at '' Appoquinimy' by the S.P.G. with the Rev. Thomas Jenkins appointed its first missionary, 1708. Queen Anne of England, for whom the Church was named, is said to have been a patron. This Church was built 1765-1771 through efforts of the Rev. Philip Reading, buried here in 1778. — Map (db m34695) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — NC-114 — Sgt. William Lloyd NelsonCongressional Medal of Honor Recipient
William Lloyd Nelson was born near Dover, Delaware, on February 22, 1918. He was the son of J. Clarence and Carrie Phillips Nelson. Following his family's move to a farm near Middletown, he was educated in the public schools of the community. He attended Middletown High School when it was located here, graduating in 1937. An active member of the 4-H Club and Future Farmers of America, he was recognized for his athletic achievements in baseball, basketball and football. On January 9, 1941, he . . . — Map (db m10609) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — This Tree Was Living When William Penn Came to Pennsylvania
1682 - 1932 This tree was living when William Penn came to Pennsylvania 1682 White Oak, Quercus Alba Girth Breast High, 1932, 14ft. 4 ins. — Map (db m73845) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — Three Welsh Members
Three Welsh members of the St. George's Anglican Church were reinterred here on Jun 20, 1937, the 232nd anniversary of St. Anne's Parish. Their remains were removed from the church cemetery when the C & D Canal was widened in 1937. — Map (db m73846) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Middletown — Welsh Tract
Approximate southern boundary of tract of thirty thousand acres granted by William Penn to the Welsh in 1701. It included what is now Pencader Hundred, Delaware, and a part of Cecil County, Maryland. — Map (db m3769) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Broad Dyke
Original dyke built by Dutch 1655. Centre of Twelve Mile Circle marking top of Delaware, surveyed 1701, by Empson and Pusey. — Map (db m25532) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-15 — Buena Vista
Built in 1845 by John M. Clayton (1796-1856) Secretary of State in President Taylor's cabinet. He also served Delaware as U.S. Senator, jurist and Secretary of State. He drafted the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty, which eventually guaranteed that the Panama Canal would be open to ships of all nations. This house is now a state museum. — Map (db m14131) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-193 — Crane Hook Church — •••
Built in 1667, Crane Hook Church was located one mile east of here on what is now Pigeon Point Road. The Church took its name from the land located between here and the Delaware River. Under Dutch leadership, this area was colonized by the Swedes and Finnish-Swedes in the early 1660s. The English took control of the Delaware colony in October 1664 and afforded the religious freedom needed to build this Swedish Lutheran church. Built of logs in a blockhouse style, the Church’s projecting second . . . — Map (db m67354) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Delaware - Desert Shield / Desert Storm Memorial — by the Delaware River and Bay Authority
Desert Shield • Desert Storm A tribute to all members of the United States Armed Forces who gallantly and courageously performed their duties during the Desert Shield Operation and the Desert Storm War Action in Kuwait-Iraq and Saudi Arabia. May God continue to bless these United States — Map (db m68265) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Delaware & New Jersey WWII Submariners MemorialDedicated to those who serve in Submarines of the U.S. Navy — The Silent Service ~ Pride Runs Deep
Left Side of Marker U.S. Submarine Veterans World War II 52 United States Submarines On Eternal Patrol U.S. Navy Submarines Paid Heavily for their success in World War II 374 Officers and 3131 Men are on board these 52 U.S. Submarines still on patrol Albacore – Amberjack – Argonaut – Barbel – Bonefish – Bullhead – Capelin – Cisco – Corvina – Darter – Dorado – Escolar – Flier – . . . — Map (db m68549) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Delaware Memorial Bridge1951 - 1968 — Dedicated to the Delaware & New Jersey Veterans of WWII
Delaware Memorial Bridge 1951 - 1968 South Span Dedicated August 18, 1951 North Span Dedicated September 12, 1968 Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey dedicated these Bridges on September 12, 1968 to the Men and Women of the State of Delaware and the State of New Jersey who gave their lives in the Armed Forces of the United States of America during World War II and its subsequent military conflicts. The Delaware River and Bay Authority Governor of Delaware: . . . — Map (db m68255) HM WM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Delaware River and Bay Authority Veterans Dedication
Dedicated to our Veterans Whose Loyalty and Service during times of war and peace define the character of this great Nation — Map (db m68462) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Delaware River and Bay Authority Vietnam MemorialIn Memory of Vietnam War Dead
In Memory of Vietnam War Dead Dedicated to those from Delaware and New Jersey who made the Supreme Sacrifice in the Service of their Country — Map (db m68262) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Delaware Street Wharf ReconstructionNov. 1982 - May 1983
The original landing was started during the 17th century of stone filled wood cribs, being enlarged several times. The city acquired ownership from the New Castle Frenchtown Railroad Co. in 1914, and rebuilt the wharf with a concrete face on new wooden cribs, the trustees paying half. The New Castle Ferry Co. docked here from 1925 into 1927, when they moved to Chestnut St. The present work places new concrete base and walls on new wood piles driven outside the former cribs. — Map (db m57133) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Fort Casimir
was built by the Dutch in 1651 and recaptured by them from the Swedes, 1655. Site now lies beneath the Delaware 250 feet E.N.E. from this stone which is erected by the Delaware Society of the Colonial Dames of America, 1905, to commemorate the period of the Dutch colonization on the Delaware. — Map (db m57130) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Frenchtown Railroad Sleepers
These stones were sleepers in the New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad. Completed in 1831. The first railroad in Delaware and one of the first in the United States. — Map (db m25531) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — General Thomas Holcomb17th Commandant of the Marine Corps — 1936-1943
"You will be the first officer of the Corps to hold the rank of General - the highest rank in our Armed Forces. I know of no other officer to whom that distinction more fittingly belongs." - Secretary of the U.S. Navy, 1944

On December 1, 1936, (then) Major General Thomas Holcomb was appointed to the office of Major General of the Marine Corps. Continued beyond the mandatory retirement age - by order of the President - and advanced to Lieutenant General on January 20, 1942, Lieutenant . . . — Map (db m57127) HM

Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — George Read
born A.D. 1732 Died 21st September 1798 Member of the Congress of the Revolution. The Convention that framed the Constitution of the U. S. and of The first Senate under it. Judge of admiralty President and Chief Justice of Delaware and a signer of the Declaration of Independence — Map (db m54693) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Gunning Bedford House
Built about 1760. Home of Gunning Bedford, eleventh governor of Delaware. Born 1742. Lieut-Col. in Haslet's Delaware Regiment. Wounded in Battle of White Plains 1776. Presidential Elector 1788. Also home of Caleb P. Bennett, twenty-ninth governor of Delaware. Born 1758. Served in Haslet's and Hall's Delaware Regiments. With Washington at Yorktown. Commanded forces at New Castle 1812. Great grandson of Daniel Boone. Later residence of Andrew C. Gray. Birthplace of George Gray, lawyer, statesman and judge. — Map (db m25558) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Historic Museum
Rear of house built in seventeenth century. Main building built after 1738 by Dr. John Finney. Home of Nicholas Van Dyke, seventh Governor of Delaware. The marriage of Ann Van Dyke to Kensey Johns, Sr. took place here April 24, 1784. George Washington was a guest at this wedding. — Map (db m54703) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Home of George Read
Site of home of George Read. Born September 18, 1733. Died September 21, 1798. Member of The Congress of the Revolution. The convention that framed The Constitution of The United States, and of the first senate under it. Judge of Admiralty, President and Chief Justice of Delaware, and a signer of The Declaration of Independence. House destroyed by fire, April 1824. — Map (db m25560) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — In Memory of Philip and Lydia Laird
Former owners of the Read House, their home for fifty-five years. They were longtime benefactors of New Castle doing much to encourage and promote the preservation and architectural beauty of this colonial town. — Map (db m54697) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Korean War Veterans MemorialThe Forgotten War — 1950-1953
33,742 K.I.A 103,284 Wounded 8,177 Missing in Action We Shall Not Forget Freedom Is Not Free Dedicated May 30, 2003 On the 50th Anniversary of the signing of the Armistice In Honor of Delaware’s Fallen Heroes — Map (db m68655) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-28 — Landing Place of William Penn
Near here October 27, 1682, William Penn first stepped on American soil. He proceeded to the fort and performed Livery of Seisin. “He took the key, thereof,…we did deliver unto him 1 turf with a twig upon it, a porringer with river water and soyle, in part of all.” — Map (db m3530) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad
Built 1832. One of first railroads in country. Extended from this point to Frenchtown on the Elk River. Important connecting link between the North and South. Absorbed by Delaware Railroad 1856. — Map (db m3549) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — N.C. 13 — New Castle Common
This land is part of a tract of one thousand acres set apart by William Penn in 1701 for the inhabitants of the town of New Castle. Trustees were appointed and incorporated by Penn’s heirs in 1764, whose successors still hold and manage the land. — Map (db m3212) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — New Castle Court House 1732New Castle Historic District
New Castle Historic District has been designated a Registered National Historic National Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exception value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States. U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service 1968 — Map (db m64763) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-111 — New Castle United Methodist Church
The origin of Methodism in this community can be traced to the years prior to the American Revolution, when pioneering clergymen such as Thomas Webb and Francis Asbury visited here to spread the message of their faith. Due to the predominance of long-established denominations, and a relatively small membership, early attempts to establish a Methodist Society were unsuccessful. After a long period of inactivity, efforts were revived, and by 1819 a group was organized and meeting regularly in the . . . — Map (db m54700) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Packet Alley
Packet boats from Philadelphia met stage coaches here for Frenchtown, Maryland, chief line of communication from North to Baltimore and South. Andrew Jackson, David Crockett, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, Lord Ashburton, Sam Houston, Louis Napoleon, Stonewall Jackson, Indians (led by Osceola and Black Hawk) en route to visit "Great Father" in Washington — all passed this way — Map (db m25559) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Presbyterian Church
Founded as a Dutch Reformed Church, 1657. The first building was on the Strand end of the church lot. This church was one of 7 which organized the first Presbytery in America in 1706. Present brick meeting house was built 1707. — Map (db m3383) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Read House & GardensDelaware Historical Society
In 1797 the foundation of George Read II's mansion was laid only feet from his statesman father's home on a busy New Castle street. By 1805 the stylish Federal period house towered over its neighbors. A fire claimed the home of George Read I, as well as most of the buildings on the southern end of the block, in 1824. Townspeople rebuilt, but the two lots in front of you remained open. George Read II owned both lots in 1833 as well as the open river lot behind you.

Immediately after purchasing . . . — Map (db m54704) HM

Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-134 — Site of Bellanca Airfield
An airfield, aircraft plant, and service hangar were built here in 1928 by Giuseppe Mario Bellanca and Henry B. duPont. An aviation pioneer, Bellanca immigrated from Italy in 1912. His plane Columbia was Charles Lindbergh's choice for a Trans-Atlantic crossing, but he was unable to secure its use. Two weeks after Lindbergh's flight Columbia was flown non-stop to Berlin, a world record 3,911 miles. Bellanca's Miss Veedol flew the first Trans-Pacific flight in 1931. Over the . . . — Map (db m14133) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Site of Fort Casimir
One hundred feet to the East of this point is the site of Fort Casimir. Erected by Dutch in 1651. Taken by Swedes 1654, called Fort Trafaldigheets or Trinity, retaken by Dutch under Petrus Stuyvesant in person September 11, 1655. — Map (db m25530) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — NC-158 — St. John's Lodge no. 2Grand Lodge of Delaware, A.F.&A.M.
First chartered by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania as Lodge No. 33 on April 3, 1781. Early meetings were held alternately at Christiana Bridge and New Castle. This was one of four Lodges whose representatives gathered in Wilmington on June 6 and 7, 1806, to form the Grand Lodge of Delaware. At this historic meeting the Lodge was formally warranted as St. John's Lodge No. 2. Joseph Israel, a Revolutionary War officer who had served as Charter Master of Lodge No. 33, was selected to serve as . . . — Map (db m14134) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — The Green or Market Plaine
Laid out by Petrus Stuyvesant, Dutch Governor, 1655. On this green stood the old jail and gallows. Here were held the great fairs and weekly markets from early times. — Map (db m3423) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — The River Road
Portion of the early cart road laid out by Augustine Herrman, Lord of Bohemia Manor to connect his Maryland estate with Appoquinimink Creek and the Town of New Castle. Known as the “The Old Man’s Road”, this was one of the earliest links between the Delaware River and the Chesapeake Bay. — Map (db m64571) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — The Welcome Society of Pennsylvania
Honors the city of New Castle, Delaware where William Penn first landed in the New World, 27 October 1682. — Map (db m57128) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Van Dyke House
Built about 1820 by Senator Nicholas Van Dyke. The marriage of Dorcas Van Dyke to Charles I. DuPont took place here Oct. 6, 1824. At this wedding the Marquis de LaFayette was a guest, and gave the bride in marriage. — Map (db m57131) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), New Castle — Wounded Combat Veterans Memorial — Dedicated to all men and women wounded in all wars
Dedicated to all men and women wounded in all wars My stone is red for the blood they shed. The medal I bear is my country’s way to show they care. If I could be seen by all mankind maybe peace will come in my lifetime. — Map (db m68261) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-41 — American PositionBattle of Cooch's Bridge
On September 3, 1777, an American Light Infantry Corps composed of Continental soldiers from New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, with militia from Pennsylvania and Delaware, was stationed west of Christina Creek between Aikentown (Glasgow) and nearby Cooch's Bridge. Intended as an advance force with orders to give the British "as much trouble as you possibly can," they were met by Hessian and British troops moving forward on present-day Old Cooch's Bridge Road. Led by . . . — Map (db m14788) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Battle of Cooch's Bridge
American light infantry and cavalry under General William Maxwell encountered advance guard of British and Hessian troops under Generals Howe, Cornwallis and Knyphausen in this vicinity September 3, 1777. American troops were expert marksmen drafted by General Washington from the several brigades of his army then encamped near Wilmington. Only battle of American Revolution on Delaware soil and claimed to have been the first in which the Stars and Stripes were carried. Erected by the Patriotic . . . — Map (db m9774) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-42 — British PositionBattle of Cooch's Bridge
On the morning of September 3, 1777, soldiers of the Hessian Field Jaeger Corps encountered American light infantry positioned in the woods and fields along this road, which led from Aikentown (Glasgow) to Cooch's Bridge. The Americans attacked the Hessians, forcing the British army to deploy two light infantry battalions in an attempt to outflank them. Fighting was intense and at times hand-to-hand. The Hessian and British soldiers eventually forced the American troops back to a final position . . . — Map (db m57931) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-106 — Deer Park Hotel
Since the mid-18th century an establishment for public hospitality has existed here. The first building, of wood construction, was known as St. Patrick's Inn. Famous visitors included surveyors Mason and Dixon. The property was purchased by James S. Martin in 1847, and the core of the present structure was erected by him circa 1851. The new building was named The Deer Park Hotel. The coming of the railroad to Newark resulted in an increased demand for hotel and tavern accommodations. In the . . . — Map (db m9907) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Delaware's Field of Valor
On 3 September 1777 an American light infantry corps under the command of Brigadier General William Maxwell engaged British and Hessian forces here in the Battle of Cooch's Bridge. Maxwell's Corps was composed of soldiers from New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia and militia from Delaware and Pennsylvania. This plaque is dedicated to those soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their country and whose remains rest beneath this field of battle. Their names and numbers unknown. We will always honor their valor and courage. — Map (db m14789) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-104 — Ebenezer United Methodist Church
The first meetings of this congregation were held in the homes of its members. In 1824 a stone church building was erected at this location. The growth of the congregation resulted in the replacement of the original building by a one-story frame structure in 1859. Formerly a part of the Hockessin Charge, Ebenezer became a separate station in 1897. a parsonage was constructed soon thereafter. It would serve as home for the church's ministers until it was dismantled in 1968. With the spread of . . . — Map (db m10443) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Enjoy the Pencader Area Today
If you are just "passing through" or are a new resident or even a life-long Delawarean, we hope to spark your interest in the varied activities available in the Pencader Hundred Area. Whether your are experiencing these for the first time or rediscovering your heritage, we hope you enjoy what Pencader has to offer. Left Column Parks The Pencader Hundred Area has many parks for the public to enjoy. Lum's Pond is a state park located on Howell Road just east of Rout 896. Picnic . . . — Map (db m10871) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-115 — Head of Christiana Presbyterian Church
The first Presbyterian services in this area were conducted by Rev. John Wilson in 1706. Then pastor of New Castle Presbyterian Church, Rev. Wilson came every other Sunday to minister to the many residents of this area who had immigrated from Scotland and Ireland. In 1708, a modest log structure was erected on land owned by John steel. The first installed pastor was Rev. George Gillespie, a native of Scotland, who arrived in 1713 and served until his death in 1760. During his tenure the log . . . — Map (db m9979) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-159 — Hiram Lodge No. 25Grand Lodge of Delaware, A.F. & A.M.
By the 1780's members of the Masonic fraternity were organized and meeting locally. On December 6, 1802, a charter was issued by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania for Lodge No. 96 in Newark. This was one of four Lodges whose representatives gathered in Wilmington on June 6 and 7, 1806, to form the Grand Lodge of Delaware. At this historic session the Lodge was formally warranted as Hiram Lodge No. 3. regular meetings were discontinued circa 1827. On June 27, 1870, Masonry was restored in this . . . — Map (db m9972) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Historic Iron Ore Mining
What is iron ore? Iron is a silvery-white, solid metal, though when found in Pencader Hundred, it commonly appears as a brown and sometimes nearly black oxide of iron. Its chemical symbol Fe, is derived from ferrum, the Latin word for iron. By volume, iron is the most abundant element, making up 34.6% of the earth. In Pencader Hundred, a medium to low grade of iron ore was mined from open pits on Iron Hill and Chestnut Hill. How was it made into iron? To refine iron ore it is . . . — Map (db m10705) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — In the BeginningFormation of the Delmarva Peninsula
Left Column Delaware is the second smallest state in the country. However, we played an important role in the formation of the nation. Caesar Rodney rode from Lewes to Philadelphia to cast the deciding vote for independence in 1776. We were the first state to ratify the Constitution in 1787. Piedmont Rocks(Crystaline Rocks): Metamorphosed (changed by pressure and heat) sedimentary rocks of the ancient North American Continent and adjacent ocean basin. Wilmington . . . — Map (db m10867) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Iron Hill School #112CPreserving History: The African-American Community of Iron Hill
The Iron Hill Museum is dedicated to the study of human and natural history of the Iron Hill Area. The Museum is currently engaged in a project to restore the Iron Hill School #112C and document the experiences of African-American students who attended the school between 1923 and 1965. In order to achieve this, the Museum has embarked on an oral history project to formally interview and record the memories of former students who are now between the ages of 40 and 80. Oral historian Roberta . . . — Map (db m10053) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-151 — Meeteer House
In the late 18th century a paper mill was established by Thomas Meeteer on the banks of nearby White Clay Creek. In later years Thomas was succeeded in business by his sons Samuel and William. the property on which this house stands was purchased by the brothers in 1816. It is believed that the structure was built soon thereafter. By the 1820s the brothers were among the largest property owners in Mill Creek Hundred. The large and impressive nature of the home reflects the wealth and importance . . . — Map (db m9976) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Milling in Pencader Hundred
What is Milling? Milling is a process of taking whole bulbs, tubers, nuts, seeds, grains or other foods from its original size to a smaller size by pounding, grinding or rolling it until it is the consistency of a meal, flour or powder. Early Milling From the beginning of history, man has known that grain was a great energy food. When he realized that grain could be planted and cultivated, it became possible for him to stop the wandering life and settle down in one spot. In order to get . . . — Map (db m10712) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-130 — New Century Club
In 1893 a group of Newark women established a literary and social organization known as the Tuesday Club. Later renamed the New Century Club, the organization became part of the General Federation of Women's Clubs. Committed to matters of civic responsibility, the Club's adoption of the motto "Not for ourselves alone" reflected its deep interest in social service. Throughout its history the New Century Club of Newark has played a key role in advancing education, healthcare, environmental . . . — Map (db m9969) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Newark Academy
Founded at New London, Pennsylvania, in 1741 by Rev. Dr. Francis Alison, removed in 1752 to Cecil County, Md., and in 1767 to Newark. Chartered by Thomas and Richard Penn 1769. Closed from 1777 to 1780 on account of Revolutionary War. Merged with Newark College (now University of Delaware) 1834. Separated from college 1869 and continued as independent academy until 1989. Many famous men were educated in this school. — Map (db m9781) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-136 — Newark United Methodist Church
By 1799 a small group of Methodists was organized and meeting in the homes of its members in the Newark area. Desiring a permanent place of worship, the congregation built the town's first church building on land that was provided by Isaac Tyson at Chapel and New Streets. On April 8, 1813, members gathered in the unfinished structure to receive the deed for the property and elect trustees for the newly established "Newark Chapel." By the 1840s the growing congregation was in need of a new home. . . . — Map (db m9897) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Old Welsh Tract Church
Oldest Primitive Baptist Church in America. This marker was presented by Delaware Chapter - Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America. — Map (db m39553) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-139 — Oriental Lodge #12, I.O.O.F.
The origins of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows can be traced to the creation of beneficial trade societies in England. Composed of craftsmen who practiced a variety of different or "odd" occupations, the purpose of these organizations was to support the needs of members and improve the communities in which they lived. The I.O.O.F. was formally established in this country in 1819. In 1834, the Odd Follows of North America separated from the English Order. Some years later, a group of Newark . . . — Map (db m9898) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-124 — Pencader Presbyterian Church
On October 15, 1701, William Penn granted 30,000 acres of land to William Davies, David Evans, and William Willis "in behalf of themselves and Company of new Welsh Purchasers." Known as the Welsh Tract, this expansive holding attracted large numbers of settlers who had immigrated from Wales to Colonial America. The settlers soon established two churches, known respectively as Welsh Tract Baptist and Welsh Tract Presbyterian. The Presbyterian church was subsequently renamed "Pencader," a Welsh . . . — Map (db m9773) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-129 — Pride of Delaware Lodge #349 IBPOEW
The Improved Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of the World was formally organized in 1898. Designed to promote civic improvements, the IBPOEW is one of the largest fraternal organizations of its type in the world. Responding to the request of a group of Newark citizens, the IBPOEW issued a charter for Pride of Delaware Lodge #349 on March 29, 1923. The first Exalted Ruler of the new lodge was W. G. Saunders, a long-time leader in Newark's African-American community. The present Lodge Hall . . . — Map (db m9974) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Purple Heart Trail in Delaware
Dedicated by Governor Jack A. Markell and the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Department of Delaware July 27, 2011 The National Purple Heart Trail Memorializes those heroic soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines who have had the Purple Heart medal bestowed upon them in the name of the president of the United States for being wounded or forfeiting their lives in the defense of our nation. The original Purple Heart, designated as the badge of military merit, was established by . . . — Map (db m65649) WM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-116 — R.T. Foard and Jones Funeral Home
Completed in 1886, this was the home and place of business of Theodore F. Armstrong, a prominent local merchant and civic leader. Reflecting the growing prosperity of the community and its residents, this hybrid of Queen Anne and Gothic architecture is a fine example of the splendor and flamboyance of the Victorian ear. Active in community affairs, Mr. Armstrong served as President of the Newark City Council, and as a member of the State House of Representatives. In 1888 he was appointed . . . — Map (db m9905) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NCC-34 — Robert Kirkwood, Jr.
Born in 1756, Robert Kirkwood, Jr. spent his youth on the family farm several miles north of Newark. Kirkwood eventually enrolled at the Newark Academy, later to become the University of Delaware. When the American Revolution began, Kirkwood was commissioned first lieutenant in the Delaware Regiment under the command of Colonel John Haslet. He would be promoted to captain in December 1776. In the early years of the war, Kirkwood distinguished himself as a military officer at such battles as . . . — Map (db m47261) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-167 — St. John African Methodist Church
This congregation was organized circa 1848. Early meetings were held in a log cabin at this location on land that was conveyed to trustees of the "Protestant Methodist Church" in 1850. In 1866 the members of the First Colored Methodist Protestant denomination merged with the African Union Church, which had been founded in Wilmington in 1813 and was the first incorporated religious body controlled entirely by African-Americans. The new denomination became known as the African Union Methodist . . . — Map (db m9968) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-122 — St. John the Baptist Church
In 1868, the original Old Village Presbyterian Church, which stood on this location, was purchased by Charles A. Murphey. The property was donated to the Catholic Diocese of Wilmington, and the church was named St. Patrick's. It became a mission of Church of Immaculate Conception in Elkton, Md. On the morning of December 25, 1880, the Floor collapsed, and a decision was made to raze the church. While a new church was being built, Sunday Mass was held in the Newark Grange Hall. Because of the . . . — Map (db m9779) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — The Battle of Cooch's Bridge
On September 3, 1777 over 800 Americans forming the Light Infantry Corps of Brigadier General William Maxwell engaged about 2,000 British Light Infantry and Hessian and Anspach "Jägers" (light infantry) in a series of skirmishes ending at Cooch's Bridge. Maxwell's newly-formed corps was composed of Continentals from New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia, as well as militia from New Castle and Chester counties. For one week Maxwell's Corps had harassed and scouted the . . . — Map (db m10055) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — The Chambers House
Top Panel: A historic house leaves, then returns to the family. The story of the Chambers House begins in 1775 when Benjamin Chambers bought 250 acres of land and set up a sawmill on nearby White Clay Creek. His son Joseph built this house about 1820 following Benjamin's death. After 1841, the house and land changed hands many times, but none of the new owners belonged to the Chambers family until 1927, when a distant relative of the original owners bought it. The new owners, Mary . . . — Map (db m72723) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — The Judge Morris EstateThe Former Home of a Delaware Attorney and Judge
Built in the 1790s, this 2½ story gray fieldstone house is the former home of Judge Hugh M. Morris. Morris was a Delaware native, respected attorney and distinguished federal judge. He purchased the house and a large parcel of land here in 1933.

Besides serving as a federal judge, Morris built one of the most important law practices in the state and kept closely involved with the University of Delaware. Yet, he still found time to run his farm, buy more land, and turn the farmhouse . . . — Map (db m39506) HM

Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-182 — The Philadelphia CampaignBattle of Cooch's Bridge
In August 1777, British forces under the command of General William Howe landed at the Head of Maryland's Elk River. Their goal was the capture of Philadelphia, the capital of the young republic. On September 3, advancing troops were engaged by an American force under the command of General William Maxwell near Cooch's Bridge. In a clash which cost each side as many as forty casualties, the Americans successfully delayed the British before withdrawing to join the main army. Despite subsequent . . . — Map (db m14787) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-36 — The Wedge
The wedge-shape tract, west of the Maryland and Delaware curve, consists of approximately 800 acres of land. For more than a century, the property was claimed by Pennsylvania but governed by Delaware. In 1889, a joint committee appointed from both states awarded it to Delaware. This decision was ratified by Pennsylvania in 1897, by Delaware in 1921, and by the Congress of the United States in 1921. — Map (db m9961) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Veterans Memorial
In memory of the men from Newark who gave their lives in World War II and in honor of those who served in the great wars Ralph E. Adams • Woodrow W. Gravenor • Harold N. Sheaffer Robert G. Allen • Charles W. Greer, Jr. • Ralph R. Skillman James R. Anderson • Thomas S. Inghams, Jr. • George R. Thorn Harvey L. Baldwin • Roland P. Jackson • Frank R. Thoroughgood George G. Barnett • William N. Jones, Jr. • O. James Walter Philip A. Beaman • Charles W. Keith, Jr. • Clarence E. Weible Horace C. . . . — Map (db m9901) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — NC-53 — Washington's Reconnaissance
Generals Washington, Greene and Lafayette came to Iron Hill, August 26, 1777 in hope of viewing British army then landing along Elk River. Only a few tents could be seen. A heavy storm coming up, they spent the night in a nearby farm house. — Map (db m9778) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newark — Your Gateway to Pencader HeritageExploring the Past
Left Column Welsh Tract Church William Penn granted a 30,000 acre tract of land to three Welshmen, (David Evans, William Davis, and William Willis) in 1701. They and their followers had left southern Wales in search of religious freedom. In encouraging settlement of this portion of "the lower three counties", William Penn was defending his charter against possible incursion of settlers from the adjacent Calvert Charter which established Maryland. The Welsh were an Old School . . . — Map (db m10874) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newport — NC-96 — Ashley Mansion
Ashton Richardson built Ashley Mansion in 1804 on land he inherited from his father. A prominent Quaker, Ashton Richardson owned several milling operations and was considered one of the most eligible bachelors in the area. after marrying in 1807, Richardson and his wife Mary occupied the house until their deaths in the early 1850's. Ashley Mansion remained in the Richardson family until 1899, when the property was sold. In 1916 the house was purchased by Jefferson D. Chalfant, the acclaimed . . . — Map (db m13556) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newport — N.C. 71 — Oliver Evans (1755-1819)Inventor and Engineer
Born in Newport, Delaware, September 13, 1755, son of Charles and Ann Stalcop Evans. Invented automatic machinery for flour mills; first high-pressure steam engine adapted to commercial use in America; and first American land vehicle to move under steam power. Died in New York City April 15, 1819. — Map (db m54481) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newport — NC-95 — The Home of William Julius "Judy" JohnsonBorn October 26, 1899 - Died June 14, 1989
In 1975 William Julius “Judy” Johnson became the first Delawarean elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. During his career, 1921 through 1936, Johnson was considered the best third baseman in the Negro Leagues. In 1935, Johnson served as captain of the Pittsburgh Crawfords, a team that also featured Hall of Famers Satchel Paige, Oscar Charleston, Josh Gibson and Cool Papa Bell. Later he served as a scout for the Philadelphia Athletics, the Philadelphia Phillies, and the . . . — Map (db m72633) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Newport — Wilmington & Western Railroad
The Wilmington and Western Railroad. A 20-mile track between Wilmington and Landenberg (PA) was built in 1872 to furnish passenger and freight service to the communities and industry along the red clay valley. In 1883, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad purchased the line and operated it until the 1920's. — Map (db m46805) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Odessa — NC-90 — Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House
Believed to be one of the smallest Quaker Meeting Houses in the nation, the Appoquinimink Friends Meeting House was built in 1785 by David Wilson and presented to the Friends as a gift. Local tradition identifies this structure as a stop on the Underground Railroad during the years preceding the Civil War. While enroute to destinations north of Delaware, runaway slaves would hide in the loft of the church in order to escape capture. Prominent local Quakers who served as agents on the Railroad . . . — Map (db m10308) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Odessa — Duncan Beard
Delaware clock-maker of great distinction and silversmith lived and labored here for about thirty years until his death in 1797. Was a prominent member of Old Drawyers Presbyterian Church. Made contract with State of Delaware in 1776 for manufacture of gun-locks. — Map (db m10541) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Odessa — Odessa
Indian Village Appoquinimi. Part of large grant to Alexander D'Hinoyessa, vice-director of New Amstel. Edmund Cantwell second owner of tract, 1673. Village named Cantwell's Bridge, 1731. Once important grain shipping center. Named Odessa 1855, after Russian grain port. — Map (db m10307) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Odessa — NC-153 — Old Drawyers Presbyterian Church
The history of this congregation may be traced to the 1670s, when Dutch and Swedish members of the "Reformed Church" were gathering locally for worship. By the first decade of the 18th century the settlement of persons largely of Scottish descent resulted in the formal establishment of a congregation in the area then known as Appoquinimy. The first known church, a wooden structure, was erected nearby on land that was purchased in 1711. A subscription to erect a new church was circulated in . . . — Map (db m10538) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Odessa — NC-147 — Old St. Paul's Church
In 1831,a Methodist Society was organized in this community. The congregation was incorporated as Cantwell's Bridge Methodist Episcopal Church in 1832. A small meeting house known as "Brickbat Church" was subsequently constructed on land provided by Joseph C. Griffith. Dedicated in 1852, the new structure was formally named St. Paul's M.E. Church. It was designed by noted architect Samuel Sloan. The congregation continued to worship here for over a century before moving to a new site on Main . . . — Map (db m10539) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — Floating Cabins and Skinning ShacksSymbols of the Marsh
Left Panel The European Markets Port Penn once figured prominently in world markets. As the supply of beaver fur in the American West declined, European demand for quality fur remained high. toward the end of the 19th century, muskrat pelts became an important material for fur coats, hats and winter clothing. Even after their fur went out of fashion in the 20th century, however, muskrat trapping in Port Penn continued providing food for local families. Sturgeon roe (eggs) from the . . . — Map (db m10435) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — Market SquareLocal Trade
Left Panel Sacred Spaces in Secular Places Two congregations formed in Port Penn. Members of the Presbyterian Church were primarily of European descent and dominated the local economy and society. The congregation of St. David's Methodist Church was predominately African-American. Today, each church welcomes worshippers of all races. At times, the same pastor ministers to both churches. Center Diagram and Caption The map of Port Penn dated January 13, 1792, shows Market Square . . . — Map (db m10395) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — NC-131 — Port Penn Front Range Light
In 1875, Congress approved funding to build several lighthouses along this segment of the Delaware River. This site was purchased in April 1876, and by December the Port Penn Front Range Light was completed. Constructed under the direction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, it was a two story frame structure with a lantern room above. The light was powered by a double-wick oil burner. The floors below served as living space for the lighthouse keeper and his family. Keepers were Henry C. . . . — Map (db m10536) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — Port Penn SchoolhouseSymbol of the Community
Left Panel State Stewardship: Linking People, Culture and Environment After operating the museum for fifteen years, the Port Penn Area Historical Society transferred the schoolhouse museum to the Division of Parks and Recreation in 1991. It now serves as the cornerstone of the Delaware Folklife Program's mission to document and interpret Delaware's local culture. Port Penn's marshland and ways of life remain a focus of the Division's interpretive programs. Center Panel Eight . . . — Map (db m10430) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — The Cannery LotOpportunity from Change
Left Panel Local Goods, Global Markets In the changing economy of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, small towns looked for ways to survive. Port Penn's livelihood depended on exporting local agricultural goods to major markets miles away. The cannery and other export operations connected Port Penn's economy to trade networks throughout the country and the world. Center Panel The W.B. & J.S. Zacheis, Inc. cannery operation stood across the street from the schoolhouse from . . . — Map (db m10396) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — The Cleaver HouseAt the Crossroads of Commerce
Left Panel Changing Times in Port Penn Following construction of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal (c.1829) a few miles to the north, major shipping began to bypass Port Penn. The town still managed to provide local agricultural producers with a convenient method to export their goods. The port began to lose its competitive advantage with the advent of the railroad. Today Port Penn is known as a fishing village. Center Panel A symbol of the Cleaver family's importance to the . . . — Map (db m10388) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — The Hubbs HouseArchitectural Statement
Left Panel Mail Order Houses Buildings ordered from Sears, Roebuck and Company came as a complete set of pre-cut lumber for assembly on-site. The company's "Honor-Bilt" system allowed buyers to erect homes at relatively low cost. People could select from a variety of standard floor plans or develop their own custom plan. Outbuildings, furnaces, and interior features were also available. Mail order houses are found in many communities across the United States. They remained popular . . . — Map (db m10391) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — The Stewart HouseVisions of Growth
Left Panel Flemish Bond: Strength and Beauty The handsome brick pattern on the Stewart House is common on early 18th-century buildings. Flemish bond is achieved by overlapping bricks like a woven fabric. Although a labor-intensive design, it increased the strength of the structure. When building materials became stronger and more consistent by the 19th century, simpler and less expensive styles of brickwork became more common. Center Panel Stewart's vision was like many . . . — Map (db m10392) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Port Penn — Wetland WaysBob Beck: Preserver of Port Penn Traditions
Port Penn is a community connected to its wetland landscape. Seasonal changes bring about changes in the lifestyles of Port Penners themselves. Autumn waterfowl hunting and winter muskrat trapping lead into spring shad runs and summer sturgeon fishing. The livelihoods of local families have been dependent upon these cycles on the river and marsh habitats for three centuries. This sense of kinship with the environment is characterized by the traditions of people like Bob Beck. Bob's family has . . . — Map (db m10438) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Smyrna — NC-89 — Clearfield Farm
Built in the mid-eighteenth century by Captain David Clark, Clearfield Farm was the home of his grandson John Clark (1761 -1821), Governor of Delaware from 1817 -1820. John Clark served as Colonel in the Delaware Militia and as Justice of the Peace before being elected Governor in 1816. After his term expired, Clark moved into the town of Smyrna to become President of the Commercial Bank of Smyrna. Following his death, the property was inherited by his granddaughters. Local folklore identifies . . . — Map (db m69112) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Stanton — NC-50 — Hale-Byrnes HouseStanton, Delaware
George Washington's "General Staff Headquarters" on September 6, 1777. Here Generals Washington, Lafayette, Wayne, Maxwell, Sullivan, and Greene planned defense of Wilmington. House built circa 1750 by Samuel Hale. Owner 1776 - Daniel Byrnes - a miller and preacher. Restored by Delaware Society for Preservation of Antiquities. Donated to State in 1971. — Map (db m13555) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Townsend — NC-117 — Old Union Methodist Church
A log church was built here in 1789 on land donated by Joseph Dickinson. The church was named "Dickinson's Chapel" in his honor. Francis Asbury and many other pioneers of American Methodism conducted services here. Levi Scott, a native of this area and member of the church, became the first Delawarean to serve as a Methodist bishop. He is interred in the adjoining cemetery. The present church was constructed in 1847. Then known as Union Methodist Episcopal Church, it continued to serve the . . . — Map (db m10608) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Townsend — NC-93 — Taylor's Bridge School(District No. 66)
On April 5, 1923 a frame schoolhouse located nearby was destroyed by a storm. Within two weeks the General Assemble appropriated $5,000 to construct a new school. Although the amount proved to be inadequate, P.S. duPont, through the Delaware School Auxiliary Association, provided the balance necessary to complete the project. On October 27, 1923 the State of Delaware purchased three acres on this site to build the new brick on-room structure. Construction began shortly thereafter. In 1949 the . . . — Map (db m10596) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Ways Corner — NC-120 — Chester-Bethel United Methodist Church
The roots of this congregation can be traced to the efforts of Methodist pioneer Thomas Webb, who visited this area to spread the message of his faith in the years prior to the American Revolution. Influenced by his sincerity and eloquence, a local society of Methodists was organized circa 1775. The first meetings were held in the homes of its members. Around 1780, a log meeting house was constructed on land provided by Robert Cloud. Known as Cloud's Chapel, this building served the . . . — Map (db m39343) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Ways Corner — Chester-Bethel United Methodist Church Veterans Memorial
In memory of those who served in the Armed Forces — Map (db m39342) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — A Pathway through the Past
The trail you are standing on is surrounded by clues to this area's history. Some clues are clearly visible. Others are in the ground where you cannot see them. Archaeologists and historians study all these clues along with written records to learn what happened here in the past.

Grinding stones and broken pieces of pottery show us that there was once a village of Native Americans here. These clues were discovered by archaeologists digging nearby. There were settlements in Delaware as . . . — Map (db m39710) HM

Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — African American Medal of Honor Recipients Memorial
[Panel 1:]African American Medal of Honor Recipients Memorial The Medal of Honor takes its place in our country as the highest award for military valor. The honor, awarded by the President in the name of Congress, may only be accorded an individual who in action involving actual conflict with an enemy, "distinguished himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity in action, at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty." The history of this medal, the deeds for . . . — Map (db m67423) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-169 — Alexis I. duPont Middle School
The oldest portion of this structure was erected in 1893 to replace two smaller schools that were no longer adequate to serve the needs of local students. This building was constructed largely through the efforts of the duPont family, long-time supporters of public education in Delaware. It was named for Alexis Irenée duPont in recognition of his many years of service as an active member of the boards of local schools. Opening in January 1894, the building was distinguished by its unique . . . — Map (db m14758) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-102 — Bethel A.M.E. Church
On May 10, 1846, a group of African-American residents of Wilmington who had affiliated themselves with the African Methodist Episcopal Church held a meeting for the purposes of electing trustees and organizing as a corporate body. At the time, approximately 15 families were meeting from house to house, worshipping under the direction of ministers from Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church in Philadelphia. The following September, the congregation purchased land at 12th and Elizabeth Streets on which a . . . — Map (db m11010) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — Bill McGowan — 1992 ~ Baseball Hall of Fame Inductee
William Aloysius McGowan Born: January 18, 1896 in Wilmington, DE Died: December 9, 1954 in Silver Spring, MD Elected to Hall of Fame by Committee on Baseball Veterans: 1992 He introduced a colorful umpiring style with vigorous, aggressive gestures which bordered on the pugnacious – yet ejected very few players. He was an iron man among umpires, not missing an inning for 16 years (2,541 consecutive games). — Map (db m72835)
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — Brandywine Springs
A fashionable spa and hotel was located on this site from 1827-1853. Distinguished personalities, such as Henry Clay, came for relaxation and enjoyment. T.U. Walter, the architect of the U.S. Capitol, designed and remodeled the hotel buildings. Since destroyed by fire. — Map (db m14756) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-101 — Brandywine Village
Around 1740 water-powered mills began to appear in this area where the Brandywine River ends its journey falling 124 feet in its final five miles. Small vessels carrying grain from nearby farms sailed directly to the mills. Other ships laden with flour sailed away to distant markets where Brandywine Superfine flour was known for it high quality. In 1799 residents of the community erected a handsome building to serve as a community hall and school. By 1820 several fine millers' homes overlooked . . . — Map (db m13585) HM
Delaware (New Castle County), Wilmington — NC-138 — Brown v. Board of Education
Delaware remained a racially segregated society until the mid-twentieth century. Though the segregation of public schools was supported by the “separate but equal” doctrine that had been upheld by the nation’s highest court, the facilities and services provided students were hardly equal. Seeking to address this situation, citizens in the communities of Claymont and Hockessin solicited the counsel of Louis L. Redding, the state’s first African-American attorney. In 1951, with the . . . — Map (db m3124) HM
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