HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 
Show DirectionsOmit Marker TextClick to map all markers shown on this page.
Kansas Markers
1685 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 1435
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — 50th Anniversary of Humboldt
Bandstand erected 1907 commemorating 50th Anniversary of Humboldt Plaque presented to City of Humboldt July 4, 1976 "Bicentennial" — Map (db m57434) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Abel Secrest
Farmer Abel Secrest was shot by Confederates Oct. 14, 1861 after refusing to give up his mules. — Map (db m57471) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Aunt Polly Crosby's Cabin Site
Aunt Polly Crosby, First Mother of the Church, Poplar Grove Baptist. Site of her cabin. — Map (db m57483) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Block House Recruiting Station
A Block House was built here, used as a recruting station, part of Log Town. — Map (db m57482) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Civil War Monument
Dedicated to the Citizens of Humboldt, Kansas, past and present, who believe the strength of a community lies in its faith in God and each other, its integrity, and its commitment to freedom for all. Humboldt, Kansas "A Delightful Place" "With malice toward none; With charity for all; With firmness in the right, As God gives us to see the right, Let us strive on to finish the work we are in -" A. Lincoln 2nd Inaugural Address We invite you to visit the 12 . . . — Map (db m57436) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Colonel Irvine
Confederate Col. Irvine invited himself to supper at the Wakefield's, sparing the house from burning. — Map (db m57480) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Colonel Orlin Thurston
Commanded Allen County Troops Found dying Secrest Saw Mill Owner. State Senator. Founded Newspaper. Abolitionist. — Map (db m57472) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Confederate Soldier
was shot here Oct. 14, 1861, as he tried to remove Union flag. — Map (db m57465) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — George Alexander Sweatt
George A. Sweatt Park is named for Humboldt native, George Sweatt, born December 12, 1893. He graduated from Humboldt High School in 1912. Following military service in World War I, he attended Pittsburg State University from 1920 to 1922. A good student and all-around athlete, Sweatt earned a teacher's certificate and became that school's first black athlete to receive a letter in football, basketball, and track. In 1922, Sweatt began a seven-year professional baseball career in the Negro . . . — Map (db m57489) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — German Evangelical Church, 1860
Under the brick veneer is the framework of the original German Evangelical Church, 1860. — Map (db m57473) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Humboldt Underground Railroad
On the East Bank [of the Neosho River], escaped slaves traveled through caves and tunnels to secret Underground Railroad stations. — Map (db m57486) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — J. A. Coffey
Founder of Humboldt 1857 and Coffeyville 1869 — Map (db m57469) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Kate Burnett
Kate Burnett saved $25,000 in land warrants by hiding them in tall grass behind Land Office. — Map (db m57463) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Neosho River Log Town
Among scrub oaks along the Neosho [River], log town housed soldiers of the Kansas 9th — Map (db m57466) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — O'Brien's Mill
Home Guard quartered at O'Brien's Mill. Confederate soldiers burned the mill. — Map (db m57487) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Sad Saga of Vegetarian Creek — .7M South Turn Left
In Mid-March, 1856, the first emigrants of the Vegetarian Settlement Company set out for the Neosho River Valley in Kansas Territory. Henry S. Clubb promoted Kans. Terr. as a permanent home for believers in Vegetarianism, hydropahty, and abstinence from alcohol, tobacco, tea, coffee, and fowl and dairy products. Farms of 102 acres, radiating from an Octagon-shaped center were planned. Clubb's promises of streets, grist-mill, sawmill, and temporary housing for the 60 families (some 150 . . . — Map (db m57499) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Sophia Fussman
During burning of Humboldt, Sophia Fussman saved valuables on a feather bed thrown down her well. — Map (db m57470) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Veterans Memorial
Lest We Forget Those Who Serve [Armed Forces and POW/MIA Emblems] — Map (db m57430) WM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Veterans Memorial
Memorial to Veterans of All Wars In Memory of Vicksburg Post No. 72 Grand Army of the Republic 1861 - 1865 Lawton Circle No. 97 Ladies of the G.A.R. — Map (db m66605) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Humboldt — Walter Johnson Birth Site
On November 6, 1887, Hall of Fame baseball pitcher Walter Perry Johnson was born on this farm site. In 1901, he moved with his family into the town of Humboldt. During a career with the Washington Senators from 1907 to 1927, he became famous for his fastball and his sterling character. Hank Thomas Grandson and Author —————— [Concrete baseball diamond pad] [Pitchers mound] Frank & Minnie Johnson family farm Effie, Walter, Earl, & Leslie . . . — Map (db m57497) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Iola — 53 — Boyhood Home of General Funston
Frederick Funston, five feet four and slightly built, went from this farm to a life of amazing adventure. Youthful exploring expeditions in this country were followed by two years in the Arctic from which he returned down the Yukon river 1,500 miles by canoe. After ventures in Latin America, he served 18 months with Cuban Insurgents, fighting in 22 engagements and reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. Invalided home shortly before the Spanish-American War, Funston was made colonel of the . . . — Map (db m53285) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Iola — McCook Post No. 51 G.A.R. Civil War Memorial
This memorial in memory of Union soldiers who fell in battle was dedicated on May 31, 1909, and maintained by McCook Post No. 51, G.A.R. In 1998 the statue was refurbished and a new pedestal was erected. On June 2, 2001 this Monument was rededicated by the Veterans' Day Committee of Iola. Erected May 30, 1909 — Map (db m34600) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Iola — Town of Iola
When the town of Iola was organized in January, 1859 Josiah E. Colborn was one of the founders who named the town after Mrs. Colburn whose given name was Iola She and her husband rest here This tablet is provided by gifts from school children of Iola to record the origin of the city's name and as a memorial to Mr. and Mrs. Colborn — Map (db m34607) HM
Kansas (Allen County), Iola — World Wars Memorial
1917 - 1918 The American Legion In memory of those whose final resting place is known to God alone U.S. Army James E. Cook 1944 • Rex L. Johnson 1944 A. W. Redding Jr. 1943 • Joseph H. Wood 1942 U.S. Navy Howard N. Belvoir 1942 • Loren W. Flack 1943 Victor W. Foster 1944 • W. C. Shaffer 1943 — Map (db m72039) WM
Kansas (Allen County), Moran — Civil War Memorial
In memory of Our Fallen Comrades May 30, 1893 — Map (db m71279) WM
Kansas (Anderson County), Garnett — Civil War Memorial
In memory of our soldiers who fought in the Great Rebellion of 1861 and 1865 — Map (db m72040) WM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — "Grand Village des Canzes" — Atchison County Historic Site — Lifeways of the Kanza
Independence Creek was noted as the main settlement of the Kanza Tribe as far back as 1673. By the time French explorer Etienne Veniard de Bourgmont arrived in 1724 this was considered an old village and the capital of the Kanza nation. This large village covered the areas all along the Independence Creek valley. From this and other villages the Kanza controlled much of what is today's state of Kansas. The Kanza dwelling was eclectic, using the most available building materials. Their . . . — Map (db m52993) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — "the water...contains a half...Glass of ooze"
"The water we drink or the Common water of the missourie at this time, contains a half a Comm Wine Glass of ooze or mud to every pint-" William Clark June 21, 1804 The Missouri River of Lewis and Clark's era was wild and unpredictable. It earned the nickname "Big Muddy" due to the abundance of sand, sediment, silt, and clay. In a constant state of change, the river cut side channels, chutes, eddies, boils, sandbars, backwaters, and oxbows - strong currents in some places, slow in . . . — Map (db m44801) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — "this day being...the 4th of July"
The U.S. Army expedition led by Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark camped in this vicinity on July 4, 1804. In honor of the nation's 28th birthday, expedition members fired the swivel cannon on the bow of their keelboat once in the morning and at the end of the day. During the course of the day, they named two local streams - Fourth of July 1804 Creek and Independence Creek. This was the first time they celebrated the 4th of July during the expedition. Clark wrote: "...as this . . . — Map (db m52994) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — "walked on Shore above this Creek"
"...Capt. Lewis walked on Shore above this Creek and discovered a high moun from the top of which he had an extensive view, 3 paths Concentering at the moun..." William Clark July 4, 1804 The U.S. Army expedition led by Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark paused here on July 4, 1804. It is possible that the mound that Clark described is the bluff that rises above this site. In his journal, Captain Clark enumerated the members of the expedition, concluding with: "1 Corpl & . . . — Map (db m44812) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — 4th of July, 1804 Creek
July 4, 1804 William Clark recorded in his journal that on this date, the Corps of Discovery "Passed a Creek 12 yrs. wide...comeing out of an extensive Prarie reching within 200 yeards of the river, as this Creek has no name, and this being the...the [sic] 4th of July the day of the independence of the U.S. call it...4th of July 1804 Creek" — Map (db m44786) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum
Amelia Earhart was born July 24, 1897 in the home of her grandparents, Alfred G. and Amelia Harres Otis. The home was constructed circa 1860. The Birthplace Museum is owned by The Ninety-Nines, Inc. International Organization of Women Pilots Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior April 16, 1971 Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum Dedicated July 26, 1997 An . . . — Map (db m44630) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Amelia Earhart Historic District
Listed on the National Register on Feb. 1, 2002. It reflects the varied architectural tastes of Atchison's early residents. It contains a collection of architecturally significant building types dating from 1860 - 1928. — Map (db m44633) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Astronauts of the Shuttle Columbia
In honor of these astronauts who perished serving their country in space on the Shuttle Columbia, February 1, 2003 Rick D. Husband, Commander Wiliam C. McCool, Pilot Michael P. Anderson, Mission Specialist David Brown, Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Mission Specialist Laurel Blair Salton Clark, Mission Specialist Ilan Ramon (Israel), Mission Specialist — Map (db m47686) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Atchison County Courthouse
On the Register of National Historic Places — Map (db m44653) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Atchison County Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall
On the Register of National Historic Places — Map (db m44776) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Atchison County World War I Memorial
Let us hold in grateful memory the Atchison County men who gave all for God, Country and Humanity in the World War 1917-1919 [Roll of Honored Dead] Private Bryan Amend Co. C., 140th Inf., 35th Div. Died at Ft. Sill, Okla., Feb. 1, 1918 Private Iradell Babcock Caisson Co. 2, 110th Ammo Train, 35th Div. Died at Ft. Sill, Okla., Nov. 17, 1917 Private Aloysius L. Bichlmeier 385th Field Hospital, 332nd Sanitary Train, 97th Div. Died at Camp Cody, N.M., . . . — Map (db m44728) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Atchison Post Office
On the Register of National Historic Places — Map (db m52975) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Atchison Veterans Memorial
Dedicated Nov. 11, 1999 to all veterans of Atchison County KS who served our country in times of war and peace Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. John 15:13 — Map (db m44815) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Atchison WWI Factory Supported Freedom — Atchison County Historic Site
At this site Atchison Leather Products operated a grease factory that filled a vital need to keep the world free. Before World War I the only factory producing a certain grease needed in munitions production and packing was in Italy. With the war looming, Italy ceased exporting to try to stay out of the coming conflict. This void left factories in England and the US unable to pack needed munitions. Atchison Leather [P]roducts began construction sometime after 1910 and operated this factory . . . — Map (db m44639) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — B. P. Waggener House
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m52984) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Birth Place of Amelia Earhart — July 24, 1897 — Atchison, Kansas
Dedicated May 21, 1982 In memory of A.E. 50th anniversary of her first trans-Atlantic flight — Map (db m52974) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Birthplace of the Santa Fe Railway Company
To commemorate the birthplace of The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company in Atchison, Kansas February 11, 1859 From this small beginning - a rail line connecting Atchison and Topeka, Kansas - a great transportation system evolved bringing much pride and renown to our city which gave its name to an institution of vital importance to this area & the nation. Dedicated May 15, 1965 — Map (db m44788) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Founding of the Santa Fe Railway
This marker commemorates the founding of The Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railway in Atchison, Kansas September 17, 1860 — Map (db m44778) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Frank Howard House
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m44632) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Homeland of the Kanza Indians
As early as the 1600s, the Kanza (or Kaw) Indians migrated from their home east of the Mississippi River and up the Missouri River into what is now northeastern Kansas. In the 1700s, the Kanza occupied two villages on the west bank of the Missouri: one on Independence Creek in present-day Doniphan County and the other near present-day Fort Leavenworth. In the early 1800s, the Kanza lived in the Kansas River valley. Two treaties, one in 1825 and another in 1846, forced them to give up their . . . — Map (db m44816) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Lewis Discovers a High Mound
July 4, 1804 William Clark recorded in his journal that on this date: "Capt. Lewis walked on Shore above this Creek and discovered a high moun[d] from the top of which he had an extensive view, 3 paths Concentering at the moun[d]" — Map (db m44794) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Lincoln Address
To commemorate an address given near this corner by Abraham Lincoln on "The Issues of the Day" the night of December 2, 1859 Erected October 2, 1917 — Map (db m44652) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Lincoln School — Atchison County Historic Site
"Put the children together, leave them alone, and they will work it out." Dave Carey, Sr. 1955, on integrating Atchison Public Schools The Lincoln School in Atchison, Kansas began in 1921 as the school for all African-American students through 8th grade, but it became much more than that. It became the hub of the community and then the focal point for the drive to integrate the school system in Atchison. With the start of classes in September, 1955, Atchison and the Lincoln School . . . — Map (db m44691) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — 5 — Massasoit House — Company and Division Headquarters, Added Station — Sep. 14, 1861 - Nov. 20, 1861
On September 14, 1861 the "Central Overland California and Pike's Peak Express Co." who were the original owners and operators of the Pony Express moved their offices from the Patee House in St. Joseph, Missouri to here at the "Massasoit House." It was located 164 feet east at the NW corner of Second and Main. The actual "horse" Pony Express was now operating to California from Ft. Kearny, Nebraska twice a week. The Pony Express mail between here and Ft. Kearny was carried by stagecoach. . . . — Map (db m44626) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — 117 — Mormon Grove — The City that Disappeared
Near here, located in a grove of young hickory trees, was an important rallying point in 1855 and 1856 for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormon), then emigrating to the Rocky Mountains.

The campground, really a temporary village covering about 150 acres, consisted of the grove, a large pasture fenced by native sod and a ditch, and a burial ground located on the elevated ridge between the grove and the farm. Though one or two permanent structures were erected, . . . — Map (db m55363) HM

Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Muchnic House
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m52976) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — The Bridge Over 4th of July 1804 Creek
This stream was named by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark when they stopped at the present site of Atchison, Kansas on July 4, 1804. The following is an excerpt from Clark's logbook: "...as this creek has no name, and this being the 4th of July, the day of the Independence of the U.S., call it 4th of July 1804 Creek..." - William Clark Dedicated July 4, 1996 — Map (db m44784) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — The Lewis and Clark Expedition
In 1804-06, Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led about 40 soldiers and boatmen on an epic journey. President Thomas Jefferson commissioned this "Corps of Discovery" to find a route to the Pacific Ocean through the newly acquired Louisiana territory. Along the way, they mapped the land, recorded its resources, and contacted its native inhabitants. The landscape has changed since Lewis and Clark explored it: rivers have been dammed, forests cut over, prairies plowed under, and . . . — Map (db m44807) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Under a large Cottonwood... — Atchison County Historic Site
Near this site the Atchison Town Company was formed in early July of 1854 under a large Cottonwood tree on the river. The Lewis and Clark expedition rested and dined on corn July 4, 1804 near this same spot. This new Cottonwood tree dedicated June 19, 2004 to the future citizens of Atchison to rest and remember these events in its shade — Map (db m44635) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — USS Arizona Memorial
Dedicated to the 1,177 men who gave their lives on the U.S.S. Arizona and all those who have bravely served the United States of America. Billy Edwin Gibson of Atchison County is entombed in the U.S.S. Arizona. Air raid! Pearl Harbor! This is no drill! These were the words that echoed from military radio operators on December 7, 1941. It was at 07:57 that the skies over Pearl Harbor, on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu, became filled with Japanese airplanes. It was a surprise . . . — Map (db m44640) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Webster Wirt Hetherington House — (Evah C. Cray Historical Home Museum)
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m44690) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Atchison — Working Men of the Railroads
The backbreaking work building railroads to the West was accomplished by men, like Thomas W. Haverty from Galway, Ireland. Wielding hammers and driving spikes their labor united a country and made Atchison "The Rail Centre of Kansas" beginning with the first rail connections to the city in 1860. Given on May 10, 2008 on behalf of Chairman & CEO Michael R. Haverty in recognition of the KCS [Kansas City Southern Railroad] expansion into Mexico. Sculpture by Kwan Wu, Overland Park, Kansas — Map (db m44634) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Muscotah — Joe Tinker — 7-27-1880 • 7-27-1948
Born In Muscotah, KS Inducted Into The Baseball Hall of Fame 1946 Played Shortshop With The Chicago Cubs 1902-1912 Famous For The Double Play Combination Tinker To Evers To Chance — Map (db m63753) HM
Kansas (Atchison County), Potter — 4(B) — Historic Fort Leavenworth — Oldest Army Post in Continuous Existence West of the Missouri River — 13 Miles South
Long before white men settled Kansas, traffic over the Santa Fe trail was so heavy that troops were detailed to protect it from the Indians. Fort Leavenworth, established in 1827 by Col. Henry Leavenworth, was for thirty years the chief base of operations on the Indian frontier. In 1839, Col. S.W. Kearny marched against the Cherokees with the largest U.S. mounted force yet assembled: ten companies of dragoons. In 1846, Col. A.W. Doniphan set out on his Mexican expedition; throughout the war . . . — Map (db m52956) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — Barber County Veterans Memorial — Honoring All Barber County Veterans
[Barber County Veteran Tiles] Twin Towers Beam This steel beam is from the Twin Towers that were destroyed by foreign terrorists on 9-11-01. New York City has donated it to the Barber County Veterans Memorial in remembrance of the lives that were lost in this incident. We should never forget the importance of freedom and those who help to protect it. "Lord, may the ruins of that day be the foundation for the freedoms of tomorrow." . . . — Map (db m65211) WM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — Carry Nation Home
This marks the home in Medicine Lodge of Mrs. Carry A. Nation who did outstanding work as a temperance crusader in Kansas. Born Nov. 25, 1846. Died June 9, 1911 — Map (db m65194) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — Gypsum Hills Scenic Byway
[Kiosk highlights sights along the Byway] [Historical section follows] Ancient Hills The Red Hills are unique to Kansas Their distinctive color comes from iron in the soil that "rusts" Formed 100 million years ago from red shale - sandstone - siltstone gypsum - dolomite - salt Much of the road was constructed using horses and mules. Part of Highway 160 was built as a Works Progress Administration (WPA) project. During World War II, the road was vital to . . . — Map (db m65212) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — 69 — Medicine Lodge Peace Treaties
At Medicine Lodge Creek in 1867, as many as 15,000 Apaches, Kiowas, Comanches, Arapahos, and Cheyennes gathered with a seven-member peace commission escorted by U.S. soldiers to conduct one of the nation’s largest peace councils. The American Indian nations selected this traditional ceremonial site for the nearly two-week council. Chiefs Satanta, Little Raven, and Black Kettle gave speeches, held ceremonies, and entered negotiations. They produced three treaties that reduced the size of . . . — Map (db m65195) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — Medicine Lodge Stockade
In 1874, during a period of Indian Raids in Western and Southern Kansas, the Governor, Thomas A. Osborne, organized the Kansas State Guards. Sun City and Medicine Lodge furnished the companies for this section of the state. The Stockade was built by the Militia and Citizens of Medicine Lodge. Guards were posted inside the Stockade walls. The walls of the Stockade were made of cedar posts that stood about 9 ft high. They were placed side by side and set on end in the ground. The drill ground . . . — Map (db m65193) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — Peace Treaty Memorial
To commemorate the signing of the peace treaties between the United States Government and the Five Tribes of Plains Indians at Medicine Lodge, Kans. Oct. 21-28, 1867. — Map (db m65128) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — The First National Bank
The Merchants' and Drovers' Bank was the first bank in Medicine Lodge, established in October, 1880, by H.M. Hickman from Wellington. It closed on January 10, 1882. Two days later the Medicine Valley Bank was formed with Wylie Payne, President; George Geppert, Cashier; and Frank Chapin, Assistant Cashier. In August, 1882, construction was begun on the southwest corner of Main Street and Kansas Avenue. A fine bank building was completed in March 1883. Tragedy struck on April 30, 1884, when . . . — Map (db m65130) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — The Grand Hotel
In January, 1884, Medicine Lodge citizens organized a stock company to build a first class hotel. Standiford Youmans & Co., a local business, donated the three lots at the corner of Main Street and Washington Avenue. The bricks for the structure were made here. The woodwork, furniture, and accessories were brought by ox team from the Harper railroad terminal. The Grand Hotel, the tallest building west of Wichita, opened on March 4, 1885, dazzling even the cowboys with its rich Brussels . . . — Map (db m65192) HM
Kansas (Barber County), Medicine Lodge — Veterans Memorial
Veterans Who Served... Our True Heroes [Dedicated] November 11, 2000 — Map (db m65127) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Ellinwood — Hotel Wolf
Hotel Wolf has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m59149) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — 19th Bombardment Group — 28th Squadron • 30th Squadron • 93rd Squadron
Great Bend Army Air Field April 1944 to December 1944 North Field Guam December 1944 to September 1945 187 Missions Kadena Okinawa June 1950 to September 1953 251 Missions — Map (db m66299) HM WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — 40th Bomb Group
Activated April 1, 1941 Deactivated October 22, 1946 Served with Distinction From Bases In ————————— Puerto Rico • Panama • Guatamala • Ecuador • Pratt, Kansas • Chakulia, India • Hsinching, China • Tinian, The Marianas — Map (db m66881) HM WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — 73rd Bomb Wing — 20th Air Force
. . . — Map (db m66370) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — ATSF Locomotive No. 3416
Donated to the City of Great Bend this 18th day of Sept., 1956 by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. History Purchased in July 1919 from Baldwin Locomotive Works at Eddystone, Pennsylvania at a cost of $69,000. Used in passenger service on Illinois and Missouri Divisions of the Eastern Lines, all divisions of the Western Lines, and Northern Divsion of the Gulf Lines. Converted from coal to oil fueling October 1939. Retired from service November 1953. . . . — Map (db m59846) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — City of Bakersfield — 314th BW • 19th BG • 28th BS
Vernon Chandler • James Stevens Wayne Christensen • George Lane Neil Allen • Frank Hermes Richard Ackerman • Harold Galbreath Douglas Snook • Rutger Kindberg Roy Kurre • Robert Tannehill Andrew Kerzner — Map (db m66300) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — City of Flatbush — 314th BW • 19th BG • 30th BS
Jim Hall • Francis Thompson Eugene Victor • Gerson Lacoff John Segal • Don Leeper Ernest Vick • John Keogh Don Comer • Marv Beattie John Tyrrell • Cecil Corley — Map (db m66270) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Civil War Memorial — Lest We Forget
Erected and dedicated by Ira D. Brougher Department Commander to Pap Thomas Post No. 52 Grand Army of the Republic Department of Kansas Veterans of the War of 1861 - 1865 [Honor Roll of Post No. 52 Members] [Honor Roll of Commanders] — Map (db m59159) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Civil War Memorial
In Memory of Veterans of War 1861 - 1865 — Map (db m66194) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Crew 52 — 73rd Bomb Wing • 498th Bomb Group — 875th Bomb Squadron
Robert Brett • Vonley R Bucklin Thomas Cantwell • Roger Denis Burmon Hoyle • Clarence Rarick William Schomburg • Fred Sobaski Richard Solt • David Sussman Burdette Young — Map (db m64279) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Deacon's Disciples — 58th BW • 444th BG • 678th BS
Charles "Deacon" Miller • Raymond Geiger Ted Morrill • Ernest Keller Carson Eckmann • Edward Hassig Robert Foor • John Murray A.L. Tilley • Archie Moore Delmar Pfeiffer • Elmer (mascot) — Map (db m66265) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Duke's Lead Crew — 58th Bomb Wing • 444th Bomb Group — 679th Bomb Squadron
FC "Duke" Steinemann • Russell A Heilman William J Drummy III • Max J Etra Joseph R Hampton • Rodney E Willitts George E Gardner • Everett W Cords Carl L Haase • John L Austin Lawrence D Sand • Malcolm J Setzer Loney G Boggess — Map (db m64281) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Enola Gay — 509th Composite Group
Paul W. Tibbets • Robert A. Lewis Thomas Ferebee • Theodore J. Van Kirk Wyatt Duzenbury • Robert H. Shumard Richard H. Nelson • Joseph Stiborik Jacob Beser • Morris R. Jeppson George R. Caron • William S. Parsons — Map (db m66263) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — 70 — Fort Zarah
In 1825 the Federal government surveyed the Santa Fe trail, great trade route from western Missouri to Santa Fe. Treaties with Kansas and Osage Indians safeguarded the eastern end of the road but Plains Tribes continued to make raids. Fort Zarah, at this point, was one of a chain of forts built on the trail to protect wagon trains and guard settlers. It was established in 1864 by Gen. Samuel R. Curtis and named for his son, Maj. H. Zarah Curtis, who had been killed in the Baxter Springs . . . — Map (db m55315) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Great Bend AAF Ground Training Unit
In memory of the officers & men of the Great Bend Ground Training Unit; Celestial Navigation, Link & Bomb Trainers 1943 - 1945 — Map (db m64282) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Honey - V■42 — 73rd Bomb Wing • 499th Bomb Group — 879th Bomb Squadron
George A Kimmet • Charles F Green Jr Lloyd C Hume • David S Hatcher James E Marshall • Charles W Brown William L Winters • George W Schichtel Loel N Vincent • Robert C Quail Colin E Anderson - Sq Com Walter E Chambers - Sq Com — Map (db m64283) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Jack Kilby
Tribute to Jack Kilby There was a time when engineers who improved our daily lives and spawned global industries achieved enormous prominence and public attention. Henry Ford and his tin lizzie were recognized everywhere. Alexander Graham Bell was a household name around the planet. But Jack Kilby, a son of Great Bend who changed the world with a good idea, never received that kind of recognition. Outside of the engineering labs, where he is recognized as an immortal, his name . . . — Map (db m66174) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Kansas Aviators in the B-29 Program
. . . — Map (db m66880) HM WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Kiley's Krew
Bernard Kiley Jr • Morris Schuurmans Patrick Conaghan Jr • Henry Harper Arthur Richards • Edward Tis Cecil Saul • Gilbert Dunning Milton Diley • James Husted John Herring — Map (db m66245) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Leslie J. Campbell Jr. — Brigadier General, USAF — Strategic Air Command
World War II • Korea • Vietnam Enlisted in USAAF - 1943 Native of Great Bend Distinguished Service Medal - Legion of Merit Distinguished Flying Cross - Air Medal Meritorious Service Medal Air Force Accommendation [sic] Medal Army Accommendation [sic] Medal Vietnam Cross of Gallantry — Map (db m64275) HM WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — M/Sgt Robert James Aspinall — 313 Bomb Wing • 505th Bomb Group — 483 & 484 Bomb Squadrons
Flight Engineer Born March 6, 1920 - Rochester, Wisconsin POW at Fukuoka, Kyushu, Japan Executed - June 20, 1945 — Map (db m64302) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Norman Barker
314th BW • 19th BG 33rd Air Meteorological Group Pratt Army Air Field 1944 - 45 — Map (db m66298) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Old-Bitch-U-Airy Bess — 58th Bomb Wing • 462nd Bomb Group — 769th Bomb Squadron
K.D. Thompson • Thomas F. Randle, Jr. Thurman W. Sallade • Thomas L. Price Vaughn A. Plevan* • S. Clay Sandhofer Louis N. Decory • Charles O. Trabold B. Keith Baldwin • Gordon K. Golden Leroy J. Arents — Map (db m64304) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Original B-29 Pilots At Great Bend Army Air Field
Of the 12 original pilots chosen for the B-29 program the following were stationed at Great Bend Army Air Field —————————— Marshall (Moe) Brown • Jack Doran Archie Lewis • George (Mac) McCarthy Patrick (Pat) Saunders • Leslie (Les) Sloan R.A. (Buddy) Lewis - Co-pilot of the Enola Gay — Map (db m66877) HM WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Oscar Micheaux — Jan. 2, 1884 - Mar. 25, 1951
Pioneer Black film maker & author A man ahead of his time — Map (db m66190) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Pacific Queen Z-35 — 73rd Bomb Wing • 500th Bomb Group — 882nd Bomb Squadron
Roy H. Bruns • Roy B. Brown Harold T. Bohham • Victor W. Bailey Laurence A. Dryden • Richard H. Beardsley Richard J. Rodrick • Victor E. Repp C. "Mike" Williams • Herbert C. Dunn Earle M. Bayne — Map (db m64284) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Rover Boys Express — 21st Bomber Command • 73rd Bomb Wing — 499th Bomb Group • 878th Bomb Squadron
Edmund G Smith POW • James Edward POW Ray "Hap" Halloran POW • Robert Grace* William Franz* • Guy H Knobel POW John P Nicholson POW • Anthony Lukasiewicz* Vito C Barbieri* • Robert Holladay* Cecil T Laird* — Map (db m64285) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Site of Fort Zarah — 1822 - 1872
on Santa Fe Trail — Map (db m59157) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — SSgt Thurman Walling — My Dear Kansas Friend
"Lucky Irish" Gunner 73rd BW 497th BG 870th SQ 30 combat missions from Saipan. Enroute home in the famous 52-mission "Dauntless Dottie" which led the first Saipan-Tokoyo [sic] Raid, the plane crashed on Kwajalein, June 7, 1945 In memory Herbert W Hobler Princeton, N.J. 2nd Lt 1st SQ 9th BG 313th BW Tinian — Map (db m66365) HM WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Streetscape
In the history of most successful communities, there have been defining moments. Streetscape served as such a moment for this community. In the wake of the financial adversity of the preceding decade, this community united in common effort to preserve and to build upon that which our pioneering forefathers created. Through private contributions in excess of $800,000, combined with city and state financial support, the Streetscape project was funded and the downtown core revitalized. With the . . . — Map (db m59161) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Talie Ho — 58th BW • 444th BG • 677th BS
Paul J Burnor • Kenneth W Fisher John R Brown • Harold L Hadden John M Williams • Raymond E Nelson Frank O'Neil • Ellis W Conrad Frank W Steed • Burrel S Lewis James R McFayden — Map (db m66878) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Tamerlane — 313th BW • 504th BG • 398th BS
"The Chief" Hay • John Froehlich Frank Pettibone • John Pearson James Hunter • "Hap" Owens Robert Beals • Robert Thill Charles Burton • Bill Bostick Al Ruester — Map (db m66368) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — The B-29 Memorial
[Panel] 1 The B-29 Memorial Honoring the Past... Educating the Future The B-29 Memorial was built to honor the sacrifices made by people in the past to ensure freedom for future generations. Until the 1990s, the Great Bend Army Air Field was typical of many historic places on the verge of being forgotten. Then in 1997, the B-29 Memorial Committee was formed to raise the funds to build a lasting memorial, not only to the Great Bend Army Air Field and the B-29 Bomber, but to all of . . . — Map (db m69240) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — The Fickle Finger — 58th BW • 444th BG • 676th BS
Charles E. Hansen* • Harold H Heinbaugh* Roy W Peerman Jr* • Stephen I Silverman* Robert A Gidley* • Albert J Lobozzo* Virgil E Belford • Denver P Edington* Howard L Rishel* • Walter W Gilonake* Harold D Lanham* — Map (db m66266) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — This Is It — 58th BW • 444th BG • 677th BS
John A Dunn* • Arwin C Hook* John J Buckley III* • Rufus E. S. Henry* Edward C. Johnston • John T Juracek Jr* James E O'Donnell • Philip Wolk Loney G Boggess • Ralph L Heffernan Lloyd G McNamee — Map (db m66269) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Van Wingerden's Crew — 58th Bomb Wing • 444th Bomb Group — 676th Bomb Squadron
Nicolas Van Wingerden William C Jennings* • Wendell F Geiwitz* Albert E Woltz* • Uline C Miller Thomas J Maxham* • Samuel E Davis* Kenneth C Carlson* • Rex T Phelps* Martin T Warner • Scott C Baker* — Map (db m64300) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — W. M. "Bill" Colvin — In Memory Of
Easter Pipeline & Construction Company Ellinwood, Kansas Smoky Hill Army Air Field construction — Map (db m66297) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Walter R. Anderson — Washington, Kansas
Second Lieutenant U.S. Army Air Force Navigator B-17 & B-29 2nd Air Force 16th BW - 235th BG — Map (db m66357) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Welch's Wolves — 58th Bomb Wing • 444th Bomb Group — 677th Bomb Squadron
Thomas Welch • James Johnson Robert McKay • George Glover Charles Vail • Robert McInerny Allan Hanson • James Jones Walter Grouten • James Vasbinder Bob Kilburn • Hugh Polson Am Reinhard — Map (db m64286) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Great Bend — Wichita Witch — 73rd BW • 498th BG • 874th BS
Guy T Dobbs • Robert M Rowlin* Stanley Rabicki (POW) • Kenneth E Beyer* John W Ray* • Clarence B. Hewlett* Morris R Tyler* • Edward M Sieniewicz* Richard E Sandlin (POW) • Kenneth A Seely* Gerald J Westerman* Aircraft No. 42-246654 — Map (db m66268) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Hoisington — Robert E. "Bob" Vohs Tribute — (January 14, 1913 - January 12, 1985)
Dedicated to the memory of a man who was the "all american" citizen - total committment [sic] and devotion to his country, community and family above himself. He was a most active Chamber member and freely gave us his time, expertise and handy-man skills. Our community is a better one because of Bob's committment to wanting Hoisington to be the best. Bob served as city councilman, a director on the Chamber Board and was Chamber President in 1974 and 1975. While he was President, he helped . . . — Map (db m59845) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "A Point of Red Rocks"
We set out at the ushal time and at 8 miles West We passed point of Red Rocks about 600 yds from the river and at Eleven miles crossed the paney River….Some Cottenwood on the Banks and Some Bushis. the Red Rock is evidently a volcanic production is porous like pomestone but heavier than Sand stone. Jacob Fowler, fur trapper and trader October 19, 1821 Fowler’s 1821 journal entry appears to be the first recorded mention of Pawnee Rock. Fowler’s geology is incorrect. Pawnee Rock is . . . — Map (db m64249) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "A Rallying Point for the Indians"
No one actually knows how Pawnee Rock was named. Josiah Gregg, who had been over the Santa Fe Trail eight times beginning in 1831, wrote: the attention of the traveller is directed to the ‘Pawnee Rock' so called, it is said, on account of a battle’s having once been fought hard by, between the Pawnee and some other tribe. We passed the Pawnee Rock, a huge boulder which for centuries has been a rallying point for the Indians, and still stands, in its solitary majesty, one of the mighty . . . — Map (db m64243) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "A Remarkable Rocky Point"
From 1821 until late in the 1800s Pawnee Rock was a noted landmark along the Santa Fe Trail. Thousands of wagons lumbered and creaked by here carrying goods to or from the great American Southwest. Many travelers recorded their impressions of this site in their journals and letters. After Breakfast…we all started…. Mr. Gamble and myself rode out upon the high Prairie…to a remarkable rocky point…. [its] Rocks are very large and of a glossy Black colour…. We rode upon the top which is . . . — Map (db m64245) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — "Along Came the Line of Wagons"
Slowly along came the line of wagons, and the prairie breeze brought us, in sound, faint and far between, the driver’s invocations to their mules. Matthew C. Field, journalist 1839 From 1821 until the late 1860s the Santa Fe Trail ran about two hundred yards south of here. If you were standing here while traveling west on the “road to Santa Fe” in the 1860s, your wagon caravan left Independence, Missouri, about three weeks ago. The Hispanic and Anglo drivers are . . . — Map (db m64241) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — “One of the Grandest Sights Ever Beheld”
Standing here 175 years ago Santa Fe Trail travelers looked out over a sea of grass. About three miles to the south a line of timber marked the Arkansas River which meandered across the prairie. A few plum thickets dotted the landscape, and an occasional thin line of trees traced the course of feeder streams. Otherwise, almost all that met the eye was grass and sky. On July 8, 1846, Private Jacob S. Robinson described what he saw from the top of Pawnee Rock: I witnessed one of the . . . — Map (db m64203) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — “One of the Grandest Sights Ever Beheld”
Standing here 175 years ago Santa Fe Trail travelers looked out over a sea of grass. About three miles to the south a line of timber marked the Arkansas River which meandered across the prairie. A few plum thickets dotted the landscape, and an occasional thin line of trees traced the course of feeder streams. Otherwise, almost all that met the eye was grass and sky. On July 8, 1846, Private Jacob S. Robinson described what he saw from the top of Pawnee Rock: I witnessed one of the . . . — Map (db m64205) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Marking the Rock
Pawnee Rock changed very little for ten thousand years. The hill was grass-covered with a fifty-foot-high face on the southeast side in front of you. Wind, water, and vegetation slowly eroded the stone. But Pawnee Rock has changed. The top of Pawnee Rock once was as high as the observation platform on top of the stone shelter behind you. In the late 1800s this site was quarried for building materials. Trees and the road to the top have been added. At the rim of the rock cannon barrels . . . — Map (db m64242) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Nehemiah Carson — 1826 - 1846
Private Company G 1st Regiment Missouri Mounted Infantry Mexican War Pvt Carson died of some unknown illness at this point on July 13, 1846 and was buried on the following day — Map (db m64202) WM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Pawnee Rock
A mile northeast is Pawnee Rock, a famous landmark on the Santa Fe Trail. Considered the mid-point of the long road between Missouri and New Mexico. Pawnee Rock was a symbol of challenges overcome. Many early travelers mentioned it in their journals, and many of them scratched their names into its soft surface. Here young Kit Carson, standing guard one dark night in 1826, is said to have shot his own mule, mistaking it for a Pawnee. Perhaps it was his unkind companions who named Pawnee Rock to . . . — Map (db m55303) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — 71 — Pawnee Rock
"We first rode nearly north about a mile to a remarkable Rocky Point . . .We rode upon the top which is probably 50 feet above the plain below, and from whence there is a charming view of the country in every direction." —George Sibley, 1825 Pawnee Rock made an impact on Santa Fe Trail travelers, who referenced the Dakota Sandstone outcropping in their journals. "Pawnee Rock was covered with names carved by the men who had passed it. It was so full that I could find no place . . . — Map (db m64191) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is text] — Map (db m64190) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — 50 — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
[Title is marker text] — Map (db m64197) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Santa Fe Trail — 1822 - 1872
Pawnee Rock, situated on the route of the Santa Fe Trail, frequently was used as a camping ground and a lookout for protection from the Indians by the brave men and women who traveled over the trail — Map (db m64199) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — Santa Fe Trail Monument
In honor of the brave men and women who passing over the old Santa Fe Trail, endured the hardships of frontier life, and blazed the path of civilization for posterity Pawnee Rock, given to the State of Kansas by Benj. P. Unruh, in the year 1908 Monument erected May 24, 1912 — Map (db m64248) HM
Kansas (Barton County), Pawnee Rock — William Becknell
Father of Santa Fe Trail Pawnee Rock, Kansas 150 Anniversary 1821 1971 — Map (db m64201) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Bronson — Civil War Memorial
In memory of the Heroes of '61-'65. May the deeds of valor of them and their comrades forever inspire love of liberty and country. — Map (db m71280) WM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — "A Most Deplorable Condition"
I have now over 200 in camp, and they are in a most deplorable condition….I have a mother with her dying babe in my office. The rest are in camp, in a condition next to death. Most of them have no shelter….Your agent here has no funds, no tents, nor clothing. Do for heaven’s sake send something along at once….Two poor creatures died during last night’s storm.” Plea from Fort Scott’s chaplain, September 1864. During the Civil War the ground in front of you witnessed . . . — Map (db m36270) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — "But I Can Fire a Pistol"
"But remember this, I am a girl, but I can fire a pistol and if ever the time comes I will send some of you to the place where there is [sic] 'weeping and knashing of teeth'...." Gene Campbell, in a letter to James Montgomery, January 4, 1859. Gene Campbell's anger testifies to the hatred and ill will prevalent during the pre-Civil War era called "Bleeding Kansas," and to her anguish over the violence - on this site - that ended the life of her fiancι, pro-slaver John . . . — Map (db m54075) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — "Hardy, Dashing Looking Fellows"
"The commands are given, the companies break into column....hardy, dashing looking fellows, those men, tanned up in their march from Fort Scott, from whence they have just joined us....The men are nearly all quite young....They are mounted on the best American horses, all of them being upwards of fifteen hands in height." Lt. J. Henry Carleton, describing the departure from Fort Leavenworth of the 1844 expedition to Pawnee villages In front of you stand the reconstructed barracks . . . — Map (db m36137) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — "The Crack Post of the Frontier"
Look at the structures around the parade ground. Fort Scott’s appearance is largely the work of one man, Captain Thomas Swords, post quartermaster from 1842 to 1846. Shortly after the army assigned Swords to Fort Scott, he vowed that he would make it “the crack post of the frontier.” Captain Swords built Fort Scott to last. The post’s structures reflect the political belief in 1843 that the “Permanent Indian Frontier” really would be permanent. Many frontier . . . — Map (db m36185) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Back Yards
The back yards of Fort Scott's officers' quarters provided officers and their families private space that was not available to enlisted men. Back yards were the site of diversions such as gardening, gossiping, and entertaining. Archeology has revealed previously unknown features behind this officers' duplex. Details such as limestone patios, walls, and walkways with curbs and gutters illustrate the army's effort to provide a comfortable life for its officers. The elaborate construction . . . — Map (db m36146) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Bank of Fort Scott — 1886 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Constructed, owned and operated by C.F. Drake as the Bank of Ft. Scott from 1886 to 1905. Later used as real estate, commercial & retail offices. — Map (db m44165) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — C. F. Drake Building — 1886 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Const. as a mercantile building by Charles F. Drake and occupied by a variety of retail stores and professional offices since 1886. — Map (db m44163) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Civil War Town
"If you have reinforcements...send them forward. The point to defend Fort Leavenworth is in the neighborhood of Fort Scott." General Jim Lane to the commander of Fort Leavenworth, 1861 The army had vacated Fort Scott in 1853, but the Civil War brought it back in force. The Union used the Fort Scott area to recruit and train soldiers and supply forces in Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Union facilities encompassed a large area in and around Fort . . . — Map (db m36273) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Combat Infantrymen
To Honor All Combat Infantrymen We were boys and we were young We became men on that hill we overrun Some of us lived, many of us died For a moment with us abide And join in prayer with me To honor those of the combat infantry Freedom Has A Price The Protected Will Never Know [Dedicated] Veteran's Day 2003 — Map (db m44169) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Eugene Ware Elementary School
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior Eugene Ware Elementary USD 234 Fort Scott Blue Ribbon School 2006 — Map (db m44122) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — 48 — Fort Scott
This western outpost, named for General Winfield Scott, was established by U.S. Dragoons in 1842. The fort was located on the military road that marked the "permanent Indian frontier" stretching from Minnesota to Louisiana and stood midway between Fort Leavenworth and Fort Gibson. By 1853 the Indian frontier had moved west and troops were withdrawn. Two years later the buildings were sold at auction, and they became the town of Fort Scott. From 1855 to 1860 this area stood at the heart of . . . — Map (db m21685) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Fort Scott Civil War Memorial
Main marker upper The men in whose honor this monument is erected were led by the fires of Liberty. They fought for no North, no South, no East, no West, but for one glorious and united country. carving of G.A.R. Medal Main marker lower In memory of the Vol. Defenders of the Union 1861 - 1865 Left side of front pylon carving of G.A.R. Medal Wm H. Lytle Post No. 132 Mustered Dec. 12, 1881 Right side . . . — Map (db m22172) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Fort Scott National Cemetery
This National Cemetery has been listed in The National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m61520) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Fort Scott Spanish American War Memorial
In memory of Spanish American War Veterans 1898 -- 1902 One hundred percent volunteers — Map (db m21795) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Fort Scott Yesterday
"The site selected is a ridge seventy or eighty feet high projecting like a wedge into a dry timbered bottom....A fine stream of water flows at its base....We designated [the site] Camp Scott, and would respectfully suggest that the post...be named in honor of the gallant General Commanding in Chief." B.D. Moore, Captain, 1st Dragoons, April 14, 1842, describing his selection of the site that would become Fort Scott, and the suggestion to name it to honor General Winfield Scott. . . . — Map (db m36305) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Free to Learn
If you had been an African-American student standing here around 1950, you would have been facing your school, the Hawkins School (above). This school was part of a continuum of African-American education that began with the Civil War and ended with school integration in 1955. Along with freedom the Civil War brought the need – and the previously denied opportunity – for education. Schools like the Hawkins School met that need and provided that opportunity. Prominent . . . — Map (db m36269) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Historic Fort Scott — 1842 - 1865
The blood that flowed in Kansas before and during the Civil War nourished the twin trees of Liberty and Union. — Map (db m20284) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — In Honored Memory
(top) In honored memory of those from Bourbon County who gave their lives (bottom) In memory of those who gave their lives that our nation might live. [The marker lists the veterans who lost their lives in World War I and World War II] (left side) * 1917 *    World War I    * 1918 * < Alva J. Allgood • George C. Anderson • Forest H. Bradshaw • Francis J. Brophy • George A. Brown • William N. Brown • Earl E. Carnes • Raymond Carnes • Ernest . . . — Map (db m20286) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — In Memory of The Soldiers — of the 1st Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers
who gave their lives in battle May 18, 1863 near Sherwood, Missouri Henry Aggleson Pvt Co I Greene Allen Pvt Co H John Booth Pvt Co H Edward Cockerell Pvt Co E William Grisby Pvt Co D Frank Haze Pvt Co F Milton Johnson Pvt Co I William Knight Pvt Co F Dennis Lyons Pvt Co C George Mitchell Pvt Co F Minor Porter Pvt Co F William Smith Pvt Co E George Webb Pvt Co D Peter White Pvt Co E Riley Young Pvt Co A 2nd Kansas Volunteer Battery Garrett Anderson Pvt . . . — Map (db m36303) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Infantry Life
This reconstructed infantry barracks, one of two at Fort Scott, serves to remind us of life for an infantry soldier here in the 1840s and 50s. During wartime, infantry fought on foot, but during peacetime, life in the infantry meant isolation, routine, boredom, and unappealing work. Tasks of building and maintaining Fort Scott’s structures, and the Military Road, fell largely to the infantry. But war broke the routine. In 1845 the army dispatched infantry from here to defend Texas. . . . — Map (db m36186) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Ingham Building — Pre 1906 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Queen Anne adaptation Ingham home for 80 years, site of family plumbing business succeeded by MacDonald's Shoe Shop — Map (db m57725) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Jeannette Huntington Ware
1905 - 1906 First State Vice Regent of Kansas Society Daughters of the American Revolution — Map (db m44173) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Medal of Honor
[Side A] 1st Lieut. William D. Hawkins United States Marine Corps Born: Fort Scott, Ks April 19, 1914 Battle of Tarawa: November 20-21, 1943 Buried: Punch Bowl National Cemetery, Hawaii Private George F. Pond Co. C, 3rd Wisconsin Calvary [sic], U.S. Army Drywood, Kansas: May 15, 1864 Buried: Evergreen Cemetery, Fort Scott, Kansas Private William H. Longshore Co. C., 30th Ohio Infantry, U.S. Army Vicksburg, Mississippi: May 22, 1863 Buried: Evergreen . . . — Map (db m66811) HM WM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Memorial Hall
1925 Memorial Hall was constructed and dedicated to "Those men and women who gave their lives serving our country in World War I" 2001 Memorial Hall is rededicated to "All of the men and women who have served, are now serving or will serve in the Armed Forces of the United States of America" — Map (db m20309) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Milrose Block — 1889 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Named for Rose Miller. Pressed Metal Facade. Roof Top Gazebo. Italian Renaissance Style. — Map (db m44159) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Moody Building — 1889 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Classic Revival - built for $20,000. Residential and retail bldg. for I.W. Moody owner Ft. Scott Granite & Marble Works Building listed on The National Register of Historic Places — Map (db m57765) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Normal Victory Bell
Preserved as a memorial to the Pioneer Friends of Education on this site of Kansas Normal School 1878 - 1899 —————— Restored by Fort Scott Alumni 1981 Reunion — Map (db m61466) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Quartermaster Complex
The quartermaster was the officer responsible for a multitude of functions needed to run a military post, including supply, subsistence, construction, and repair. Most of his operation took place here, in the area called the quartermaster complex. On a typical day around 1850, a clamor of activity would have filled the air. Wagons, horses, shouting, the clang of hammer on iron, even the smell of baking bread were all part of the scene. The complex contained a storehouse, bakery, ice house, . . . — Map (db m36171) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Rank, Privilege, and Officers Row
To see evidence of the rigid military caste system in the Old Army, compare the substantial homes along Officers Row in front of you to the enlisted men's barracks behind you. A soldier's rank determined his position both professionally and socially. The quality and arrangement of quarters at Fort Scott and other military posts reflected the army's segregated system. Separate quarters for officers and enlisted men kept the two classes apart. Rank also dictated that the elegant homes of . . . — Map (db m36135) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Richards Building — 1900 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Newspaper & commercial office building of Mr. Joseph Ralph Richards attorney, author, businessman & historian — Map (db m57727) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Site of Fort Henning
Built by U.S. Government, 1863. — Map (db m44129) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Star Clothing House — 1878 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
Originally one story clothing store. Star pattern repeated in window keystones. Second floor added 1891 became bordello. — Map (db m57766) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Tallgrass Prairie Trail
"The immediate site of the post...opens out rapidly to the south in a beautifully undulating prairie." Assistant Surgeon Joseph K. Barnes, describing the Fort Scott landscape in 1862. Walk this short trail and imagine "the most magnificent prairie of the country," as the land around Fort Scott was described in 1843. The trail passes through a small area of tallgrass prairie that the National Park Service is restoring to offer a glimpse of the prairie's former splendor. . . . — Map (db m36166) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — The Heart of Fort Scott
"Fort Scott can boast of the handsomest Square in Kansas Territory." Fort Scott Democrat, praising the town plaza, April 5, 1860 The grassy square in front of you silently witnessed events that defined Fort Scott and that reflected a growing nation. Built originally as the fort's parade ground, this square truly is the heart of Fort Scott. When the army sold Fort Scott in 1855, the parade ground became a town park called Carroll Plaza. Through the years this ground hosted . . . — Map (db m36285) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — The Little White House
The miniature house was built in 1927 by the park caretaker, E.V. Kelly. It was one of his many winter projects. He traveled to Mapleton, Kansas to find the perfect rocks for the walls. His daughters, Nadine and Jenny, spent many enjoyable hours making curtains and playing with the house. Through the years, the doll sized house has brought delight to many visitors. — Map (db m53288) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Welch, Badger & Co. Dry Goods Store — 1867 — Fort Scott Historic District 1860
One of the oldest existing mid-nineteenth century buildings. Const. by B.P. McDonald — Map (db m44167) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Western Hotel: Symbol of Strife
After the army sold Fort Scott in 1855, the infantry barracks located here (reconstructed in front of you) became the pro-slavery Western Hotel. The building across the parade ground directly behind you became the anti-slavery Free State Hotel. The two hotels symbolized the strife over slavery that divided Kansas in the late 1850s, an era known as “Bleeding Kansas.” Violence visited Fort Scott often during Bleeding Kansas, and the Western Hotel played a role in several . . . — Map (db m36272) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Fort Scott — Where Was the Bathroom?
"Bathing is promotive both of comfort and health; and where convenience for it are to be had, the men should be made to bathe at least once a week. The feet are to be washed at least twice a week." 1841 Army Regulations This foundation, discovered by archeologists in 1971, is all that remains of one of Fort Scott's latrines. A washhouse, used for bathing, was attached to the left. This latrine and washhouse served enlisted men living in the infantry barracks in front of you, . . . — Map (db m36168) HM
Kansas (Bourbon County), Ft. Scott — 20th Century Veterans' Memorial
In peace you served as our defender, in battle our protector, and in death, a reminder that Liberty is still our greatest Strength. Dedicated in honor of all who served in the Armed Forces of our Country in the 20th Century Duty Honor Country The back eight panels list every veteran in Bourbon County that served in the 20th century. — Map (db m21258) HM
Kansas (Brown County), Horton — "Four Horsemen of the Lines"
Unquestionably the most widely published photograph in rural electrification history captures high drama and momentum as the last miles of line are pulled only the day before energization for the Brown-Atchison Electric Cooperative Association, Inc. Horton, Kansas on March 31, 1938. Crew members on the truck were local farmers hired by a Kansas City, Missouri contractor; wages earned by the farmer-linemen went to wire their farm homes. Crew from left to right: Lind Jacobson, Junior . . . — Map (db m63775) HM
Kansas (Brown County), Horton — 111 — First REA Project in Kansas
At this site the first power pole for the Brown-Atchison Electric Cooperative was dedicated in special ceremony on November 10, 1937. Brown-Atchison was the first rural electric project to energize in Kansas financed by loan funds from the Rural Electrification Administration (REA). On April 1, 1938, central-station electricity generated at the Horton Power Plant was sent into the first section of lines to farms in Brown and Atchison counties, signaling an end to darkness and drudgery for . . . — Map (db m63774) HM
Kansas (Brown County), Horton — Horton Civic Center — [Brown County Fairgrounds]
WPA & City of Horton Project 1937 - 1939 City Engineer: Harve Lingo Foreman: Shelton Boyd "Built From Locally Quarried Limestone" Erected by Works Progress Administration and City of Horton A·D·1938 — Map (db m63782) HM
Kansas (Butler County), Beaumont — 1885 Frisco Water Tower
The 1885 Frisco Wooden Water Tower was built to service the steam locomotives, supply water for feeding stationary boilers, washing cars, and floors, cleaning out boilers, cooling ashes, fire protection, and similar purposes, at shops, engine houses, and station buildings. This tower represents, to our knowledge, the last remaining of its kind in the U.S.A. Friends of the Beaumont Water Tower was founded in 1989 and raised funds to preserve the tower. Preservation was completed June . . . — Map (db m60686) HM
Kansas (Butler County), Beaumont — Beaumont Becomes a Railroad Town — Beaumont Historical Marker
In 1879, Beaumont was established as a railroad town. It became one of the most important shipping points in the Flint Hills. Beaumont sat atop the divide that separated Otter Creek and Little Walnut Creek. Westbound trains from Piedmont had nearly ten miles of steep grade before cresting the divide. The 25,000 gallon wooden water tower was constructed and there were 7 trains consuming 35 thousand gallons of water daily. A steam engine alone used approximately 5,000 gallons between Piedmont . . . — Map (db m60684) HM
Kansas (Butler County), Beaumont — Livestock in the Flint Hills — Beaumont Historical Marker
The Flint Hills of Kansas are the last remnant of the great Tallgrass Prairie that once stretched from Texas to the Great Lakes. The calcium rich soil of the Flint Hills is renowned for its capacity to quickly fatten cattle in the spring. Beaumont, in 1910 had holding pens for 9,000 head of cattle that came and went by rail. This was before the days of feedlot grain fed cattle. At this time, Beaumont was a typical old western town. The Frisco had four eastbound and four westbound trains a . . . — Map (db m60721) HM
Kansas (Butler County), Beaumont — The Beaumont Grass Landing Strip — Beaumont Historical Marker
Local lore has it that in 1948 a Wichita businessman wanted to fly into Beaumont to check on his cattle. He asked the hotel if they would block the road for his landing. Since having a plane land in Beaumont was exciting, the residents agreed. Well, the pilot told his friends and soon many other aviators were talking about the little Kansas town where you could land and taxi your plane on the main street. It quickly became a tradition with aviators and a practice for residents to check for . . . — Map (db m60717) HM
Kansas (Butler County), Beaumont — The Frisco Ponds — Beaumont Historical Marker
These Frisco Ponds were developed in 1885 along with the now historic wooden water tower. The water was used to fuel the steam locomotives traveling west bound on the Frisco Line that had used all their water pulling the steep grade from Piedmont, Kansas. The ponds were constructed through the use of horses and large drag strips known as "Fresnos". The horse team would travel round and round increasing the depth and circumference with each pass. The Beaumont Hotel graciously received the . . . — Map (db m60735) HM
Kansas (Butler County), Beaumont — The Historic Beaumont Hotel / The Beaumont Hotel Restoration — Beaumont Historical Marker
The Historic Beaumont Hotel (Side A) The Historic Beaumont Hotel was built in 1879 by Edwin Russell. In 1885 the hotel was purchased by the Durham Cattle Company; in 1895 Durham sold the hotel to Reed Church. In 1910, when Charles Church took over the hotel, Beaumont had approximately 1500 residents. In 1930, a Mr. Westerfall bought the hotel. Nell Rauch bought the hotel in 1945 and sold it in 1947 to a Mr. Coonrod who operated it for six years. Mr. J.C. Squier, a prominent local . . . — Map (db m60623) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Alfred Washington Ellet — Oct. 11, 1820 - Jan. 9, 1895 — Dedicated to the memory of
Brig. Gen. - U.S. Volunteers Commander [Mississippi] Marine Brigade Capt. 59th Ill. Inf. Aug. 20, 1861 Lieut. Col. U.S. Volunteers Apr. 28, 1862 Brig. Gen. Nov. 1, 1862 This marker erected in 1979 at the request of his grandson, the late Charles Ellet of Palo Alto, Calif. Alfred W. Ellet was one of El Dorado's earliest settlers and up to the time of his death, the city's leading and most industrious citizen. He was a man of strong moral convictions and character. . . . — Map (db m56037) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Cable Tool Drilling Rig
This is the type of rig used in the 19 teens and into the 1930's during the oil boom in Kansas. Three main sections make up the early rigs: the boiler which was the energy source to power the steam engine that ran the rig; the derrick which was made out of wood in the beginning and later changed to steel; and the drilling floor where the machinery and men worked together to drill a well. Sitting on the very top is the crown block. The block is a group of six pulleys, each providing lifting . . . — Map (db m56040) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Celebration of Freedom Memorial
. . . — Map (db m56220) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Flare
From the former Midland Refinery. Used to burn off gasses as gasoline and propane were transferred from the refinery into the railroad tank cars. ca. 1920's Donated by: Frontier Refinery — Map (db m56165) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Grandma Anderson's House
This house was built in 1918 at 800½ South Main Street, El Dorado, Kansas, (Gordon's Addition, Lot 5, Block 4) in direct response to the oil boom and the massive amounts of people moving to the area looking for housing. Originally the home was two single-room rentals. Later the wall was opened up and the house was rented as a two room home. This is an excellent example of the type of rental housing that was available to the oil boomers. It also shows the quick thinking of El Dorado . . . — Map (db m56166) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Kansas Oil Museum
George W. Brown drilled Kansas' first oil well in 1860. Since that time, Kansas oilmen have tested their courage, their fortunes, and their luck in the search for oil in all parts of the state. The Kansas Oil Museum is dedicated to the men and women who built the Kansas oil industry. Their work and their spirit have created a proud heritage for the state. — Map (db m56039) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Missouri Pacific Depot Veterans Memorial
Honoring those who passed through this depot answering their call to duty during WWII — Map (db m56390) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Model K Star Spudder
This is a Model K Star Drilling Machine, also called a "spudder". Drilling machines such as this one were used for two purposes: 1. To drill the initial hole for a rotary-drilled well. 2. To drill a complete oil well at shallow depth (1,000-3,000 feet). This drilling machine used a cable tool rig to drill. It worked by repeatedly pounding a heavy steel bit into the ground in an up-and-down motion. The bit smashed the rock and earth below it to "make hole". A separate engine, . . . — Map (db m56125) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Mrs. Addie Cowley Bradley
In honor of Mrs. Addie Cowley Bradley who was the first white girl born in Eldorado Township; the first in Butler County; the first in the Fifth District of Kansas. Born May 4, 1858. Died Feb. 27, 1932. Boulder furnished by W.H.L. Wallace Womens Relief Corps. No. 7. ElDorado Kansas — Map (db m56038) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Oil Field Boom Towns
Oil field towns such as Oil Hill and Midian were built and maintained by oil companies such as Cities Service. These towns were fast growing and held an excitment in the early years when people moved in at all hours of the day and night. Life here was much like any other town except there were drilling rigs everywhere you looked, and those who lived here worked for the same company. This created and [sic] close knit community because everyone had the same boss. Business included: Oil . . . — Map (db m56168) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Oil Field Lease House
Once the oil boom began in 1915, men and their families flooded the El Dorado area to find work in the oil fields. Small 2 to 5 room houses were built by the oil companies on land that was leased - thus the lease house or company house. By living on the job site workers could keep wells running full time. Some Butler County leases included the Wilson, Shumway, Paulson, Enyart, Fox-Bush and Koogler. These were not classified as towns, only a group of houses and maybe a store and post office. . . . — Map (db m56092) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Pole Trailer
Manufactured by the Spencer Trailer Company in Augusta, Kansas. This was used to haul tubing (the narrow pipe located on the trailer) or casing (wider pipe). Tubing and casing is the various pipe that is used inside the hole. Donated by: Harvey Holden — Map (db m56127) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Replica of the Statue of Liberty
With the faith and courage of their forefathers who made possible the freedom of these United States The Boy Scouts of America dedicate this replica of the Statue of Liberty as a pledge of everlasting fidelity and loyalty 40th Anniversary Crusade to strengthen the arm of liberty — Map (db m56179) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Signers of the Declaration of Independence
Our Freedom Began When in 1776 These Courageous Men Signed The Declaration of Independence Father of Our County George Washington The Voice of Freedom Patrick Henry The Pen of Freedom George Mason [Signers of the Declaration are listed by State] With utmost thanks to those who live and die to preserve our freedom — Map (db m56184) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Star Drilling Machine
This machine was probably manufacturing [sic] in Chanute, Kansas in the late 1920's. It had been used in Eastern Kansas from the 1920's through the 1950's. This machine was highly portable when completely assembled and moved easily by horses and a teamster. It is capable of making a hole more than 3500 feet deep with the cable tool rig motion. — Map (db m56128) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Steel Oil Derrick / 1930's Cable-Tool Drilling Rig
This derrick is one of the last wood and steel oil derricks which once dotted the Butler County countryside. It was built in the mid-1940's and is 100 feet high. Donated by: Larry Crawford Donors: Joe Degan Pipe & Supply, Albert Hogoboom, William Rex, James Owens, William W. Ranck, Museum Volunteers — Map (db m56088) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — The Central Power Unit
Central power units were used to pump oil wells in the early days of the Kansas oilfields. One central power could pump as many as eighteen different wells, some up to half a mile away. In the 1950s producers began to replace central powers with beam pumping units. A few locations in eastern Kansas still use central power. A central power unit had four main parts: 1. Band wheel. The band wheel multiplied the power of the engine through the mechanical advantage of its long spokes. The . . . — Map (db m56130) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — The Gypsy Spudder
This Cable Tool Drilling Machine, Serial No. 5, was manufactured in Chanute, Kansas by Sutcliffe Pipe & Supply, Joe H. Sutcliffe, owner. Built in early 1949, this is the only known remaining machine. "The Gypsy" was found on a farm east of Chanute, Kansas. It was moved to the Kansas Oil Museum in August 2008 to honor Joe H. and Velma Edith Sutcliffe, and their sons: Ronald F., Donald L. Terry J., and Dale D. Sutcliffe. Donated by Ronald F. and Leah W. Sutcliffe of Midland, Texas. — Map (db m56133) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Tool Rack
Rack contains various cable tool bits such as fishing tools, jars, rope sockets and elevators. These pieces were used with the adjoining cable tool rig. Many of these pieces of equipment were stored at yards and tool houses. — Map (db m56090) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Union Tank Car
This railroad tank car has a capacity of 9913 gallons and was built in April of 1929. Used to haul raw crude oil to the refinery. Donated by: Union Tank Car Company — Map (db m56163) HM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — Veterans Memorial Flagpole
This staff dedicated to the Veterans of all United States wars who valorously defended the flag it bears Stars & Stripes waving here perpetually provided by Fred Priestley Post 1174 Veterans of Foreign Wars Constructed May 1953 Board of County Commissioners H. H. Bornholdt Chairman Mac Childs Commissioner E. M. Arnall Commissioner L. W. Newcomer County Engr. — Map (db m56182) WM
Kansas (Butler County), El Dorado — William Allen White
Dedicated to the memory of William Allen White Boyhood resident of El Dorado who became Kansas' foremost editor On his one hundredth birthday anniversary February 10, 1968 — Map (db m40003) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — 94 — A Landmark of Distinction
Cottonwood Falls has been the Chase county seat since both town and county were established in 1859. The first log cabin-courthouse was replaced in 1873 by this stately building of native limestone and walnut, which today is the oldest Kansas courthouse still in use. It was designed in French Renaissance style by John G. Haskell, who was also the first architect of the statehouse in Topeka. Prospects for Cottonwood Falls received an early setback when it was bypassed by the Santa Fe . . . — Map (db m49505) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Bates Grove and the Area Adjacent to the Cottonwood River Dam
In 1885, one Kansas writer described the area in generous words, "...at the right of the bridge on the south side of the Cottonwood River is an excellent water mill, and the music of the falling waters as they flow over the dam added to the romantic appearance of the country and the attractions created by art make the scene at once joyous, impressive and suggestive." In 1903, J.M. Bates purchased about 7 1/2 acres of land on the north side of the river, east of the road northward to Strong . . . — Map (db m45681) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Chase County All Veterans Memorial
"And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the Protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor" --The Declaration of Independence The Chase County All Veterans Memorial is dedicated to honoring all Chase Countians who have served in the armed forces of the United States of America. Please spend quiet moments in memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice for their country and to honor all . . . — Map (db m45694) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Chase County and the City of Cottonwood Falls
Chase County, named after Salmon P. Chase, who was a United States Senator from Ohio and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, was organized in 1859 in the Kansas Territory. James Fisher, from Columbiana County, Ohio was the first settler in the Cottonwood Falls vicinity in 1855. A grocery store opened in 1859, and School District #6 was organized in 1862. Cottonwood Falls became the county seat in 1864. The Courthouse was completed on October 8, 1873. By 1885, six . . . — Map (db m45683) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Chase County War Memorial
Roll of Honor In memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice in the World War 1914 - 1918 Delano Earl Bates • Frank D. Coate Walter L. Crouch • Russell Blackburn Arthur Edwards • Frank P. Faris Leonard C. Goad • Don E. Harder Bernard V. Giffin • Roy A. Giffin Russell C. Hepler • Lucy C. McLinden Clarence L. Meyer • Claude W. Newlee Cecil R. Parks • Milton R. Payne Ray A. Park • Marion M. Sidener James E. Taylor • Glen O. Umberger Howard B. Wood Roll of . . . — Map (db m45515) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Connecting the Chase County Community — from the Historic Chase County Courthouse to the — Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve
A trail to connect two communities - what a novel idea! This good idea to connect Cottonwood Falls and Strong City was first suggested in 1904. Of course it was to be a limestone sidewalk. Certainly the limestone was available and the equipment and skilled workers were at hand so why not? Like many good ideas it took several years, a hundred in fact, for the idea to become fact. The south trailhead of the Community Connection Trail is on the front steps of the Chase County Courthouse in . . . — Map (db m45578) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Cottonwood River Bridges at Cottonwood Falls
The first major bridge at Cottonwood Falls was a 150 foot long iron truss bridge constructed in 1872. The iron bridge was just west of the present arch bridge. The present bridge was constructed in 1914 by the Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Company of Leavenworth, Kansas for $13,700. The bridge is one of three reinforced masonry, earth filled arch bridges still standing in Kansas, that are based on design principles developed and patented by Daniel B. Luten, a consulting engineer from . . . — Map (db m45609) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Cottonwood River Dam
The Cottonwood River Dam visible today was built from cut limestone and later coated with concrete. The first dam was constructed of cottonwood logs in 1860 during a severe drought when the river bed was dry. The dam provided water power for a saw and grist mill. The land for the mill was given to J.B. Smith and L.D. Hinckley by Mr. Isaac Alexander who owned, surveyed and developed the townsite between the Courthouse and the river, known in 1859 as North Cottonwood Falls. The grist mill was . . . — Map (db m45679) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Cottonwood Falls — Oldest Operating Courthouse in Kansas — 1871 - 1872
Map (db m45514) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Matfield Green — 38th Parallel
Located south of the Matfield Green service area is mile marker 88, which is 38 degrees North latitude. This latitude became better known as the 38th Parallel at the beginning of the Korean Conflict. Korea was temporarily divided along the 38th Parallel in 1945 after the Japanese occupation during World War II. Because of political differences and mutual distrust between the United States, who supported South Korea, and the Soviet Union, who supported North Korea, the two halves were never . . . — Map (db m44368) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Matfield Green — The Bluestem Pasture Region of Kansas
You are in the heart of one of the great grazing lands of the world. Thousands of buffalo, antelope, and elk once roamed here. After the Civil War, and the wild days of the Texas cattle drives, it became famous as a feeding ground for beef cattle. Today, over 300,000 head are shipped in each spring from Southwestern states - more than the yearly average to all Kansas in trail-driving days. Every summer a million head, counting local herds, are fattened on its nutritious grasses. In these . . . — Map (db m44367) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Strong City — 22 — Chase County & The Bluestem Pasture Region of Kansas
The vast prairie which surrounds this site is typical of the Bluestem pasture region more commonly known as the Flint Hills. Named for its predominant grasses, the area extends from Oklahoma almost to Nebraska in a narrow oval two counties wide which covers some four and a half million acres. These pastures comprise the last large segment of true prairie which once stretched from the forests of the East to the Great Plains. Today almost a million head of cattle are fattened each year on . . . — Map (db m43260) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Strong City — Strong City — Flint Hills Scenic Byway
Originally named Cottonwood Station, Strong City received its current name from W.B. Strong, president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. This was an important railroad town and was also known for its stone quarries and stone contracting firms. Stone from the nearby quarries was used for the Chase County courthouse as well as the State Capitol building in Topeka. Crushed stone was also used to build the railroad beds. Prairie fires have occurred in the Flint Hills for . . . — Map (db m45592) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Strong City — W.B. Strong Memorial Railroad Park — Strong City, Kansas — Established 1990
The town of Strong City originated in March of 1871 when the Santa Fe Railroad was completed to the point then known as Cottonwood Station. Strong City was referred to as Cottonwood Station until 1881. In February of 1881 a petition was signed by a majority of the citizens and presented to the legislature asking that the body officially change the name to Strong. It was approved and Cottonwood Station was renamed in honor of William Barstow (W.B.) Strong, General Superintendent and later, . . . — Map (db m45601) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie Naitonal Preserve — Back to Basics
"It seemed... a lonely little house of scholarship, with its playground worn so bare... But that humble little school had a dignity of a fixed and far off purpose... It was the outpost of civilization... driving the wilderness farther into the west. It was life preparing wistfully for the future." James Rooney, Journey from Ignorant Ridge, 1976 Providing a basic education for their children was a high priority to prairie settlers. Classes began here at the Lower . . . — Map (db m60949) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve — Curious Outbuildings
Stephen F. Jones spared no expense in the construction of his Spring Hill Ranch outbuildings. The Flint Hills provided the main building materials for both the house and outbuildings - high quality limestone quarried and hand cut here in Chase County. Like today's garages, the carriage house, the small building with the wooden doors, protected a carriage or buggy from the prairie sun, wind, rain and snow. Next to the carriage house stands an unusual chicken house - even the poultry on . . . — Map (db m49503) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve — Little Barn on the Prairie
Upon completion, ranch owner Stephen F. Jones learned that his barn was one of the largest barns in the state of Kansas at the time. Like most of the buildings on the ranch, the Spring Hill barn was built of limestone -- the foundation of the Flint Hills prairie. Its three stories housed stalls, feed and grain storage for the large scale, year-round ranch operation. A team and wagon could enter the upper level by one of the ramps, unload, and easily turn around inside to exit. The . . . — Map (db m49498) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve — Prairie for the People
When Stephen F. Jones began acquiring this property for his Spring Hill Ranch in 1878, Kansas had been a state for 17 years, and much of the Kansas prairie was already being converted into cropland. The majority of the land which now comprises the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve was originally the property of the Spring Hill Ranch. More recently known as the Z Bar, the ranch included fertile bottom lands along Fox Creek which could be cultivated for crops, as well as thousands of acres . . . — Map (db m49462) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve — Spring Hill Ranch
has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America — Map (db m49497) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve — Vital Necessities
The raised concrete slab behind the house covers a combination storm and root cellar, accessible from a lower level of the house. It is said that Mrs. Jones "feared tornadoes and took extreme precautions against them." This underground chamber also maintained the proper temperature and humidity for storing fruits and vegetables through the winter. The structure closest to the house is thought to be a curing house where meats were preserved by pickling or curing or simply a summer kitchen. . . . — Map (db m49501) HM
Kansas (Chase County), Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve — Welcome to the Prairie
You have arrived at the only unit in the National Park Service dedicated to the tallgrass prairie ecosystem. Tallgrass prairie once covered a vast region that stretched from Mexico into Canada. Today, only a small fraction - perhaps less than four percent - of North America's native tallgrass prairie remains. The Kansas Flint Hills is home to the largest remnant of unbroken tallgrass prairie. Formerly known as the Spring Hill / Z Bar Ranch, the preserve provides a rare opportunity to . . . — Map (db m49499) HM
Kansas (Chautauqua County), Sedan — Midland Railway
Kansas First Excursion Railroad Baldwin KS — Map (db m57907) HM
Kansas (Chautauqua County), Sedan — N B "Stony" Wall
First Ford Agency in Kansas — Map (db m57905) HM
Kansas (Chautauqua County), Sedan — Traveling Circus Posters
The traveling circus was "here today and gone tomorrow". The one day stop included two performances. Circus management sent an advance crew two weeks ahead of time to let everyone know that the show was coming. The posters were 28" x 42" and hung in store windows by the hundreds. Larger posters hung on buildings and barns. The big circus came in on the railroad and thought nothing of posting 5,000 to 8,000 posters. — Map (db m57890) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — 2nd Kansas Colored Infantry at Fort Blair
The brush arbor was located in this general area and was used for a dining area for the troops at Ft. Blair. The colored troops were having lunch here when Quantrill's attackers approached from both the east and the south. The troops made their way through the mounted guerillas to the fort in order to retrieve their weapons and display their expert marksmanship, fearlessly defending the small camp and keeping the stars and stripes flying above Ft. Blair — Map (db m37626) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — American Legion Post 206 Veterans Memorial
Honoring all veterans of all wars and conflicts engaged by the United States — Map (db m37387) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Battle of Baxter Springs — October 6, 1863
Major General J.G. Blunt left Ft. Scott on October 4, 1863 en route to Ft. Smith. With him was his military escort consisting of about 125 men from Company I, Third Wisconsin Cavalry, and Company A, Fourteenth Kansas Cavalry. They proceeded by way of the Military Road, intending to visit Ft. Blair on the way. Gen. Blunt seemed to care a great deal about military display. He was proud of his elegantly uniformed band which played in the plaza at Ft. Scott before they departed. Advancing south . . . — Map (db m37627) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Baxter Springs Civil War Memorial
(dedication on front of marker) Erected by the United States to the Memory of the Officers and Soldiers Killed in the Battle of Baxter Springs October 8, 1863, and Other Engagements in this Vicinity who are Buried near this Monument, and Whose Names are Known, are Inscribed Hereon. (list of names on south side of marker) Maj. Henry Z. Curtis Asst. Adj. Genl. U.S. Vols. Chaplain Ozem B. Gardner 13th Kansas Infantry 14 Kansas Cavalry T. B. Long     E. B. . . . — Map (db m21140) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — 49 — Baxter Springs Massacre
On October 6, 1863, Gen. James Blunt and about 100 men were met near Baxter’s springs by William Quantrill and several hundred Confederates masquerading as Union troops. As Blunt’s band was preparing a musical salute the enemy fired. This surprise attack prevented organized resistance, and though Blunt escaped nine-tenths of his men were killed. The raiders also attacked Lt. James Pond and 95 men encamped at the springs. This force was likewise caught off guard but resisted until the enemy . . . — Map (db m37840) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — 9 — Baxter Springs Massacre Burial Site — Civil War Tour
First burial site for victims of the Baxter Springs Massacre and the attack on Ft. Blair. In 1869, the bodies were moved to the National Cemetary plot west of town. — Map (db m37836) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Bischosberger Hotel — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
Julius Bischosberger, a native of Prussia, came to Baxter Springs in 1868 and constructed a frame building for the Bischosberger Hotel and Restaurant on this site. Directly across the street to the north was the Bischosberger Livery and Feed business. Weary travelers could get a warm meal and bed, and have their horses fed and cared for. In 1900, the property on this site was razed. The present brick building was constructed that year and was used as the Baxter Springs Post Office until . . . — Map (db m37434) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Black Dog Trail — Commemorating
Opened in 1803 by Chief Black Dog (Manka-Chonka) and his band of Osage Indians who had a village nearby where springs once flowed freely. — Map (db m37839) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Cafι on the Route — Route 66 Roadside Attraction
Built circa 1870, the cafι was formerly the Crowell Bank, which Jesse James robbed in 1876. It is currently a restaurant and bed and breakfast. Recognized by Hampton Hotels Save-A-Landmark program as a site worth seeing. — Map (db m37551) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Chicago Drug Store — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
On this site, G. G. Gregg established the Chicago Drug Store in 1868, just as the town became a center for the cattle trade. The block of businesses was known as Keenan's Old Stand at that time. The Drug Store carried prescriptive and non-prescriptive medications, paint, oil, glass and fine jewelry. Gregg ran the business until 1895 when he sold to A. R. Kane. The Kane Drug Store also included a jewelry shop and watch repair service. In 1900, Kane became one of he founders of the Baxter . . . — Map (db m37501) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Crowell Bank — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
The first bank in Baxter Springs was the Bank of Baxter also called the Crowell Bank. It was established in 1870 and did business in this building. H. R. Crowell, the founder, was the second mayor of Baxter Springs. In May of 1876, Jesse James and an accomplice who may have been Cole Younger, held up the bank cashier and made off with $2900. The bandits headed south for Indian Territory, taunting locals to give pursuit. They were pursued by a posse to a point seven miles south of town. There . . . — Map (db m37531) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Drovers' and Farmers' Bank — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
In the late 1880s, this building was constructed by W. H. Horner, and in it he established the Drovers' and Farmers' Bank. The Bank was purchased by John M. Cooper and J. N. McDonald, who changed the name to the Traders' Bank. They were later joined in the bank by Will Hartley and Torrence Connor and established a new bank called the Baxter Bank. Cooper built a building on the corner across the street and moved the bank in 1900. Throughout this century, this building has housed several law offices. — Map (db m37502) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — 4 — Fort Blair — Civil War Tour
Fort Blair, constructed as a garrison for soldiers guarding the Military Road, was attacked by rebel forces of William Quantrill on Oct. 6, 1863. Although greatly outnumbered, Lt. James Pond and men from the 3rd Wisc. Cav. and Kans. 2nd Colored Inf. defended the fort with little loss of life. — Map (db m37838) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Fort Blair Blockhouse
This is a replication of the blockhouse which records tell us was in the center of the encampment. The original blockhouse measured 16 feet square and was constructed of logs. It was built to store equipment and supplies. Reports indicate that it was used as an infirmary to care for the injured after the attack. — Map (db m37621) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Fort Blair Breastworks
The breastworks that enclosed Ft. Blair measured 80 feet by 100 feet. A trench, called a rifle pit, encircled the breastworks on the inside. The dirt that was extracted to create the rifle pits was then piled outside the walls to provide a protective berm. The rifle pits are indicated here by the rocks and timbers. Near this spot, Lt. Pond fired the camp's only cannon, a small 12 pound mountain howitzer. The three volleys he fired at the invading guerillas forced them into flight to the . . . — Map (db m37599) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Fort Blair West Breastworks
The west wall of the breastworks had been removed the day before the attack in order to enlarge the encampment to make room for more than 100 additional cavalry troops which had arrived under the command of Lt. Pond. — Map (db m37623) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Illinois Cash Store — Baxter National Bank
The Illinois Cash Store, a grocery and dry goods store, was constructed on this site in 1868 by John M. Cooper who came to Baxter Springs from Illinois. In 1886, he constructed a new brick building one block south and moved the business. in 1900, Cooper constructed the present brick building to house the Baxter Bank. The upstairs was used as the Masonic Lodge Hall. In 1905, this building was acquired by the Baxter National Bank. Baxter National had been established in 1885 by A.R. Kane, J.J. . . . — Map (db m52061) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Indiana House — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
The Indiana Hotel, later renamed the Indiana House, was constructed on this site around 1870. Christian Null acquired the Indiana House in 1881 and operated the business until its closing in the late 1890s. In 1900, the present building was erected, replacing one of the colorful landmarks of Baxter Springs' "cowtown" era. In this century, it was a feed store, a grocery store, and later a general merchandise store. — Map (db m37533) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — John Baxter
In the spring of 1849, John Baxter, his wife and 8 children moved to this site and built an inn and general store and offered food and lodging to travelers who passed along the Military Road. Baxter was a colorful character -- a speculator, business man, and "gun toting preacher". A tragedy ended the life of this first citizen when he was killed in a shootout over a land dispute. Baxter Springs, incorporated in 1868, had been named for its first settler and the springs that flowed near his home. — Map (db m37598) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Murder of C. M. Taylor — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
In 1872, the Mayor of Baxter Springs, J. R. Boyd, shot and killed C. M. Taylor, marshal, near this spot. Bad blood had existed between the two for some time. The marshal approached Boyd to serve him a warrant for arrest on an assault charge. Taylor asked for Boyd's arms - a revolver and a derringer. Boyd promptly drew the derringer and shot Taylor through the heart. He fell to the street dead. — Map (db m37437) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Ohlen's Restaurant and Bakery — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
Henry and Louisa Ohlen purchased this property in February 1878 and opened Ohlen's Restaurant and Bakery. Among their offerings were ice cream and oysters which were advertised "in their proper seasons." The Ohlen's [sic] also offered a day boarding house so those who wished could "freshen up" before their meal. The restaurant was also known as Delmonico's. In the fall of 1889, the Ohlen's [sic] tore down their frame restaurant and constructed the present brick building in an effort to . . . — Map (db m37505) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Opperman Harness and Saddle Shop — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
J. P. Opperman, a native of France, came to Baxter Springs in 1871 and established the Opperman Harness and Saddle Shop located on this site. The building is still here, but lies beneath the present facade. Opperman's was one of the most successful businesses in Baxter Springs. This block of buildings was referred to as "Willard's Old Stand" throughout the 19th century. J. P. Opperman served as mayor of Baxter Springs from 1883 to 1890. Upon retirement, Opperman turned the business over to . . . — Map (db m37471) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Phillips 66 Petroleum Company Gas Station
Built in 1930 by the Independent Oil and Gas Company, this Tudor Revival style gas station was purchased by Phillips 66 Petroleum Company the same year. The original "house" style brick building was modified in the 1940s to the L-shaped plan seen today. Gas was sold and vehicles were serviced here in Baxter Springs through the 1970s. Grant funds from the National Park Service have made it possible to restore the building for use as a visitors' center. The . . . — Map (db m37388) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Polster Dry Goods Store — Baxter Springs Historic Walking Tour
In May of 1893, the Polster Brothers, Charles, John and Ed, and their mother, Elizabeth Polster, had a grand opening for their new dry goods store. The public was entertained with music by an Italian harpist, and the building was lavishly decorated with plants and paintings. Their move to this location was prompted by a devastating fire that had destroyed the Polster Hotel, Dry Goods Store, and Drug Store one block north. All the businesses had been established by the father of the Polster . . . — Map (db m37503) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — The Battle For Fort Blair
William C. Quantrill, a former Kansas school teacher, headed a guerilla army which had committed many outrages around Lawrence and Kansas City, one being the Lawrence Massacre. Quantrill received a commission of Colonel, supposedly either from General Sterling Price or the Confederate Governor of Mississippi. On his route to Texas to spend the winter of 1863 he heard of the fort at Baxter Springs and on October 6th, made a surprise attack upon the fort with approximately 300 men. Two days . . . — Map (db m37692) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Baxter Springs — Veterans Memorial
. . . — Map (db m73093) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Carona — 1932 Plymouth 0-6-0 Switch Engine
This engine is one of the first internal combustion engines used by the Missouri Pacific Rail Road. It ushered in a new form of motive power that eventually replaced the steam engine. This engine was last used at the Mackie-Clemens Mine #22 in the 1970s. The locomotive is mechanically driven thru a transmission and has drive chains to the wheels. It was restored by the Heartland's in 1999. — Map (db m34696) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Carona — Missouri Pacific Wooden Frame Depot
This wooden frame depot is typical of most small town stations of this era. The depot and water tower was [sic] originally built in the 1880s and was located about Ό mile south. The depot was torn down and moved in 1941. Due to the shortages caused by World War II the lumber and parts were recycled into the present structure. The railroad sold the depot in 1959 and it was used for hay storage. In 1996 the John Thompson family donated the depot to the Heart of the Heartlands. The depot was . . . — Map (db m34676) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Carona — Southern Pacific Bay Window Caboose
This Caboose was used by the Southern Pacific Railroad. Train crews lived in the caboose as the train traveled across the country. The bay window style allowed the crew to watch the train for any problems while riding. This caboose is on loan to the Heartland's and is owned by several club members. — Map (db m34710) HM
Kansas (Cherokee County), Columbus — Cherokee County WWI Veterans Memorial Clock Tower — "Dedicated to Veterans of All Wars"
1919 • Donated thru civic contributions Mrs. C.E. Bartlett, Chairperson 1955 • Removed from old courthouse 1983 • Rediscovered & refurbished by Mr. Starr Smith 1988 • Donated & rededicated to all Cherokee County Veterans by Starr & Eugenia Smith "We pledge to give your work of love the care and appreciation it deserves" Cherokee County Citizens — Map (db m34726) HM
250 markers matched your search criteria.
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 301 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.