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Nova Scotia Markers
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 06 — A Changing Lake-scape
Lake Micmac was smaller Lake Micmac was considerably smaller before the Canal was begun. Evidence for this can be found in the cove to the west where the remains of a forest and marsh area can be seen under the surface of the Lake. To the east is the entrance to the canal and a point of land once referred to as Indian Point. When the lake was lowered in the 1970s a Mi’kmaq camp site was discovered and the large number of artifacts which were found are now in the NS Museum. This lake is . . . — Map (db m78081) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 08 — A Testament to Hard Work
Man-made Bank You are now walking on a man made bank which forms one side of the canal cut. This wall of earth and stone was necessary to contain the depth of water needed to float the barges. During the first phase of the canal construction there would have been a minimum of approx. 2.4 meters (8 feet) of water but this was reduced to approx. 1.2 meter (4 feet) when it was decided to construct a smaller waterway in the 1850s. It is a testament to the work of the Irish and Scottish . . . — Map (db m78100) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 02 — A Village of the Most Primitive Description
Canal Camp You are looking at a part of the remains of what was known as the “Canal Camp.” The row of stones in this area represent the largest feature found to day at Port Wallace. An archeological investigation was carried out in 1997 by Archaeology students from St. Mary’s University but unfortunately nothing was discovered to indicate the use made of this particular building. However, it is in the area known as the Canal Camp where the workers and their families lived . . . — Map (db m77987) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 07 — Barges, Steamboats and Scows
Lock 2 You are now looking at the upper sill of Lock 2. The chambers of the first five Locks on the Canal are approximately 21 meters long and 5.5 meters wide. Therefore the boats and barges used on the system had to be able to fit within these chambers. The watercraft used on the Canal included three steamboats, twelve scows and an 80 ton barge. These craft were used to transport freight and passengers to and from Dartmouth and the interior of the Province. Bricks, pottery and . . . — Map (db m78083) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 01 — Before the Canal
Cutting the Canal You are now standing about one third of the way between Lake Micmac to the South (left) and Lake Charles to the North (right). Before canal construction began in 1826 there was no flow of water between these two lakes. The Mi’kmaq and early settlers wishing to go from one lake to the other had to portage or carry their boats through the 1.5 kilometres of forested area. The man made canal cut with its two locks took three years to construct and was the most difficult . . . — Map (db m77986) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 16 — Benching - An early construction technique
Benching As you look down the Cut you will see, on the left or East bank, stone walls separated by narrow, flat terraces. This construction technique was used by the canal workers to prevent the earth from sliding down the bank. It was obviously an efficient construction method as the sides of the canal cut remain almost intact two centuries later. Stop Gates If you look below and on either side of the channel you will see large cut stones which are the remains of a mitred . . . — Map (db m78117) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — Canal Shubenacadie CanalNational Historic Civil Engineering Site / Site Historique National de Génie Civil
Constructed 1826-1861 Charles William Fairbanks Francis Hall Angus McDougall Engineers / Ingénieurs — Map (db m77984) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 13 — Deep Cut
Hard Digging! From this location you can begin to appreciate the enormous task which faced the canal workers. Prior to 1826 this canal cut or trench did not exist and all of the earth and rock had to be removed. Unlike the lower part of the canal - where you saw the banks which had to be built up - in this area the channel had to be dug out. Simple hand tools, gun powder and raw strength were all that was available for this back breaking task. As you walk along the trails you will see . . . — Map (db m78105) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — Historic Shubenacadie Canal SystemLock 3 — 1824-31 ——— 1856-70
At the point you are approximately 26 meters above sea level, almost at the height of Lake Charles from which the water flows in two directions - south to the Harbour and north to the Bay of Fundy. To get to this point vessels would have traveled from the Harbour to Sullivan’s Pond (lift of 15m) via the inclined plain which no longer exists and passed through Locks 1, 2 and 3. This area of the canal provides an excellent opportunity to view all the components of a lock system - lock, dam and . . . — Map (db m78147) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 03 — Lightning Strikes at Canal Camp
Navvies The most concentrated number of features belonging to the Canal Camp are located in this area beneath the trees and along the roadway. You can still make out the remains of several stone foundations. A plan of this area prepared in 1826 shows a line of small cottages or huts. Approximately three hundred navvies (from the word “navigator” or canal labourer) worked and lived here with their families from 1826 to 1831. A newspaper article of the time reports that on one . . . — Map (db m77988) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 12 — Navvies Dwelling
A Dwelling for Two Families Imagine this structure on top of the stone foundation in front of you. This home would be similar to the one at Site No. 9. However this structure is larger and contains two small stone hearths. When excavated in 1985 by Dr. Stephen Davis of Saint Mary’s University, a knife was found beneath the hearth stones - this is believed to be an Irish tradition. — Map (db m78104) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 09 — Of Bough and Bark
Dwelling Cabin This feature represents an example of cultural transfer by emigrants to Canada from their homeland. This dwelling cabin strongly resembles the description of the cabins of the working poor in Northern Scotland and Ireland, as recorded there in the 1830s. The common elements of this and the cabins in Europe are small dimensions, set into an embankment or hillside, earth floors, no flue or chimney, the fire built on the floor. Here at Port Wallace, the roof was of boughs and . . . — Map (db m78101) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 05 — Official Groundbreaking 1829
Location of prominent historical characters at the ground breaking ceremony General location of the official ground breaking ceremony, July 25th, 1826. Looking south from the walking bridge you are viewing the general location of the official ground breaking ceremony. In a very formal manner, Lord Dalhouse, Governor General of British North America and Sir James Kempt, Lt. Governor of Nova Scotia, broke the first ground for the Shubenacadie Canal. The ceremony was attended by the . . . — (db m78078) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 14 — One of the mysteries yet to be solved…
Possibly a Storage Building for Powder This is the only example of this style of structure found anywhere along the canal. While the Archaeologists are uncertain about its use, it may have been a storage area for black powder used to blast the bedrock found in the Deep Cut. However, an analysis of the surrounding soil did not reveal any evidence of this. It is likely this round stone base would have had a roof of logs and bark. — Map (db m78106) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — Shubenacadie Canal, Port Wallace
From 1826 to 1831, canal labourers constructed two locks and the “deep cut” between Lake Charles and Lake Micmac. During these years, upwards of 250 workers and their families lived here. The locks were rebuilt and operated between 1858 and 1870. — Map (db m77956) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 15 — Summit of the Canal
Highest point of the Canal Ahead you will see Lake Charles which is the highest body of water in the Canal system. From this lake, water flows south to the Halifax Harbour and north to the Bay of Fundy. You are now approx. 29 meters (95 feet) above the level of the harbour and vessels reaching this point have been lifted up this distance by an incline railway and three locks. In the distance you have walked from Lake Micmac, you have climbed approx. 9 meters (30 feet) in elevation. — Map (db m78115) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 10 — The Fairbanks Solution
Lock 3 When first built this lock was made entirely of granite blocks, as represented by the end walls. Like the other structures of the Canal, this lock fell into disrepair between 1831 and 1854. It was completely rebuilt by Charles Fairbanks using the less expensive North American method. When operating the inner walls of the Lock would have had wooden plank surfaces. The lock raised and lowered vessels 3.7 meters (12 feet). — Map (db m77985) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 17 — The Forge
The Blacksmith’s Shop Excavated by Dr. Davis in 1985, this forge operated during both the first construction period (1820s) and the second (1850s). It was here that workers and masons would have their tools repaired and stone picks sharpened. On June 10th, 1862 Henry Findlay, Superintendent of the canal wrote in his log book: “found the fastening on the forge door had been forced off. I then started for the workshop and when half way up to it saw a man at the end of it. I gave . . . — Map (db m77982) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 04 — Unique Construction
Lock 2 Looking north from the walking bridge you see Lock 2. This lock was the first to be constructed on the Canal. Initially the lock was built totally of granite blocks (British construction method), as seen on the east wall. After the first Canal Company ceased operating in 1831 the workings of the Canal fell into disrepair. When the Canal was redesigned in 1854 by Charles William Fairbanks, a Dartmouth native, he introduced a composite stone and brace method (North American . . . — Map (db m78077) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Dartmouth — 11 — Waste Weir and Holding Pond
A water control structure The man-made holding pond in front of you helped to maintain the level of the canal when the lock was in operation. The water in this holding pond had two purposes. It helped maintain the water level in the dry summer months and minimized the drop in water level when the lock was being filled. Each time Lock 3 was used, roughly 400,000 litres of water were sent down to the next level of the canal system. Beneath the boardwalk you are standing on is what is . . . — Map (db m78102) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Black-Binney HouseRésidence Black-Binney
English Built about 1819 by John Black, successful merchant and Executive Councillor (1813-23), this house is a notable example of the finest Halifax residences of its day - the first important era of stone construction in the town. James Boyle Eniacke, Premier of Nova Scotia (1848-54), lived here for some years until about 1855. From then until 1887 the house was occupied by the Anglican Bishop of Nova Scotia, the Rt. Rev. Hibbert Binney. French Construite vers 1819 par . . . — Map (db m77657) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Canadian Corps of Commissionaires
The corps was formed in Nova Scotia and elsewhere across Canada in 1937, on the instigation of the Canadian Government, to find employment for worthy older veterans. Its organization was patterned along military lines of the British Corps of Commissionaires, founded in 1859. The Black-Binney House was acquired by the Board of Governors in 1965, and was restored as an historic building, for use as Divisional Headquarters. It is dedicated to the service of veterans as a Centennial project . . . — Map (db m77805) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Canadian Sailor's Monument
The sailor statue represents those valiant young Canadians who served in both war and peace is symbolic of the thousands of sailors who were instrumental in the victory at sea and a fitting acknowledgement to those who continue to maintain the peace. — Map (db m77597) WM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Captain / Capitaine James Cook(1728-1779)
English Before the voyages that brought him world fame as Captain Cook, this British Royal Navy officier complied navigational charts for the coasts of Quebec and Nova Scotia. While based in Halifax from 1758 to 1762, he learned triangulation and other valuable skills, which later enabled him to produce the first scientific, large-scale hydrographic survey of the dangerous coast of Newfoundland. His charts were to remain standard for a century. Cook’s masterful work prompted the . . . — Map (db m77953) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Carved in StonePierres gravées
English These gravestones were all carved by hand, using chisels and wooden mallets. Many of the old slate stones were quarried and carved around Massachusetts Bay, and shipped to Halifax before the American Revolution. By the 1770s local stone carvers were making gravestones from a poorer quality local slate (or “ironstone”). Most gravestones carved after 1820 are plain, massive sandstone. The images or symbols can be a clue to age. Older stones show symbols of . . . — Map (db m77782) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Charles Morris1711 (Boston, MA) - 1781 (Windsor, NS)
Charles Morris was Nova Scotia’s Chief Surveyor and one of he first residents of Halifax. In 1750, on order from the founder of Halifax, Edward Cornwallis, Morris began surveying the entire peninsula, laying out new suburbs and 240 acres of “common land” to be used for firewood and pasturage. A 1762 plan by Morris defined the original Halifax Common, which was officially granted by King George III to the town’s inhabitants in 1763. Morris’s role in the establishment of Halifax . . . — Map (db m77647) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Deadman's Island
These men died in captivity while serving the United States of America on land and sea during the War of 1812. They lie in unmarked graves here on Deadman's Island.

Followed by a list of 188 men identified by Name, Rank, Ship/Unit, and Date of Death. Map (db m44062) HM

Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Duke of York's Martello TowerYork Redoubt
[English Text only shown] The Duke of York's Martello Tower was one of many small towers built for coastal defence throughout the British Empire. They were usually round, with stone walls too thick to be penetrated by cannon balls. This tower protected the seaward battery from attack by land. The tower was built in 1798 by Prince Edward, fourth son of King George III, while he was the military commander at Halifax. It was named for Edward's brother, the Duke of York. What happened to . . . — Map (db m44629) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Edmund Burke
This plaque is dedicated to the memory of Edmund Burke distinguished scholar, missionary pastor, and prelate, having served for sixteen years, he was elected as Bishop of Sion and first Vicar Apostolic of Nova Scotia on July 4, 1817. He opened the first Catholic school in Halifax. He drew the plans and, on June 9, 1820, laid the cornerstone of this basilica. He died on November 19, 1820 and lies buried in Holy Cross Cemetery. In memory of the Reverend John Enslow Burns Map (db m77747) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Fairview Lawn CemeteryTitanic
Established in 1893, this non-denominational burial ground was originally known as the Green Lawn Cemetery. In 1894, the Fairview Lawn Cemetery Ltd. took over management of the cemetery which it operated for 50 years. Unable to fulfill its commitments with regard to the care and upkeep, the company handed over the cemetery responsibilities to the City of Halifax. On January 13, 1944, it was incorporated into the City of Halifax as the Fairview Lawn Cemetery. A number of famous Canadians are . . . — Map (db m77857) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Fort Needham Memorial Parkand the Halifax Explosion
This marker is composted exclusively pictures and their captions. There is a left side and a right side to the marker. Captions are presented left to right, then top to bottom. Click on the marker image to enlarge it. Left side • This view from Fort Needham was drawn and engraved by Lieutenant Colonel Edward Hick, a British officier stationed in Halifax with the 70th Regiment of Foot from 1778 to 1782. The fort consisted of wooden buildings, for the defence of the . . . — Map (db m77955) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — France and CanadaLa France et le Canada — Theirs is a story of enduring friendship./ C’est l’histoire d’une longe amitié.
France and Canada share a long history. Theirs is a story of enduring friendship. It began 400 years ago, in Nova Scotia, the birthplace of Acadie, with the arrival of the first French settlers and of Samuel de Champlain at Port-Royal in 1605. Halifax had its first contact with France at the beginning of the 18th century. In 1711, the French engineer Delabat drew fortification plans for Chebucto Bay (present day Halifax harbour). In autumn of 1746, the Duc D’Anville led an ill-fated . . . — Map (db m77622) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Georges IslandL’Île-Georges
English The Island was first fortified when the British founded Halifax in 1749. During the period of the Acadian Deportation, 1755 to 1762, the island was sometimes a detention camp for Acadians prior to being shipped to other British colonies. During the 19th century Halifax became a major British naval base and Georges Island one of an inter-connected system of harbour defences. As military technology changed, the defences of Georges Island were updated. The island remained an . . . — Map (db m77619) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Glebe House CampusSaint Mary’s University
On this site in 1802 was erected the school building which became the forerunner of Saint Mary’s University. Edmund Burke, newly appointed as Roman Catholic Vicar General in Nova Scotia, had the two-storey structure built in the hope of extending educational opportunities for Catholic young people and training candidates for the clergy. Burke’s initiative encountered repeated delays caused by opposition from the political establishment of the day and by the scarcity of qualified teachers, . . . — Map (db m77719) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Halifax and RMS TitanicHalifax et le RMS Titanic
English Here, in Halifax, lie the remains of 150 victims of one of history’s most tragic maritime disasters. Just before midnight on 14 April 1912, the White Star liner RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic. The majestic ship sank in less than three hours with the loss of close to 1,500 lives. In the aftermath of the sinking, White Star chartered three ships from Halifax and one from St. John’s to search for the dead. Of the 328 recovered, many were buried at sea. . . . — Map (db m77852) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Halifax CitadelLa Citadelle d’Halifax
English Built to defend against a land-based attack, the Halifax Citadel was the fourth in a series of forts to occupy this hill, The star-shaped fortress, completed in 1856, was the centerpiece of the extensive system of fortifications constructed by the British military from 1749 to protect this strategic port, which by the mid-19th century had become one of four principal naval stations in the British Empire. Garrisoned by the British until the Canadian military assumed control of . . . — Map (db m77827) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Halifax Waterfront Buildings
English From the founding of Halifax in 1749 until the early twentieth century, this portion of the waterfront was associated with men and events in the civic and commercial life of the city. These seven typical warehouses and offices, erected between 1815 and 1905, housed individual merchants as well as international trading and shipping companies. This ironstone building housed the office of the shipping firm, Pickford & Black (1876-1968). The building opposite was the head quarters . . . — Map (db m77826) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Halifax’s Cable Wharf
The Cable Wharf was purpose built in 1913 by the Western Union Telegraph Company and measures 108 x 17 metres (355 x 54 feet). It is where the company’s cable ships, Minia, Lord Kelvin and Cyrus Field docked and underwent minor repairs. Also serving as a supply and maintenance depot for the vessels and their equipment, The Cable Wharf was a prominent feature of the city’s waterfront and a thriving enterprise for over 50 years. Cable Ready The bottom floor of the 91 x 9 . . . — Map (db m77595) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Major General / Major-Général Robert Ross 1766-1814
English Major General Ross sailed to North America in the summer of 1814 from the Peninsular War against France to command the British army on the east coast of the United States, opening a second front to relieve the pressure on the Niagara Peninsula. He personally lead the British troops ashore and marched through Maryland to attack the Americans at Bladensberg on August 24, 1814. From Bladensberg Ross captured Washington D.C. and burned the public buildings of the city, . . . — Map (db m77877) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Mr. John SamwellMr. William Stevens
On your left near this spot lie the remains of … / À votre gauche, près d’ici se trouvent les restes de …. Mr. / M. John Samwell Midshipman / Aspirant de marine • 1797-1813 Mr. / M. William Stevens Boatswain / Maître de manoeuvre • 1757-1813 HMS Shannon English Sacred to the Memory Of Mr John Samwell Midshipman of HMS Shannon who red at the nav(e)l hospital on the 13 of June 1813 aged 18 years Also Mr William Stevens boatswain of . . . — Map (db m77897) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Norway
In memory of members of the Norwegian Merchant Navy, Royal Norwegian Navy and Royal Norwegian Army who were lost at sea or were buried in Nova Scotia during the Second World War We will remember them — Map (db m77596) WM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Old Burying Ground1749 - 1844
This land was set aside as a common burial ground outside the stockade of the new fortified town of Halifax First grave dug June 21, 1749 Granted to St. Paul’s Church June 17, 1793 Closed to burials August 18, 1844 Welsford-Parker Monument dedicated July 17, 1860 — Map (db m77743) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Old Burying GroundLe Vieux Cimetière
English The Old Burying Ground, which contains more than 1,200 head and footstones, constitutes a unique concentration of gravestone art. A rich variety of styles, poignant images and carving skill is reflected in these old stones. The winged skulls and the winged heads, or soul effigies, are exceptional. Used by all denominations, the Old Burying Ground served the city of Halifax from 1749 until its closure in 1844. Fenced and landscaped in the 1860s, it was restored as a park and . . . — Map (db m77784) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Passage to a New Beginning • Passage à un nouveau monde
English Celebrating Canada’s Immigrants In the 1940s and 1950s, Canada opened its doors wide to European immigrants. With haunting wartime memories still fresh in their minds, men, women and children from diverse countries and cultures arrived at Halifax, Saint John and Quebec City. After a voyage of a week or more across the North Atlantic many disembarked confused and exhausted, clutching their worldly possessions. Some were eager to explore their new country, while others . . . — Map (db m77876) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Philippe Aubert de Gaspé (fils)1814 - 1841
English Author of the first Canadian novel of French expression, L’influence du’ livre (1837), written in Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, Philippe-Ignace-Françoise Aubert de Gaspé was born in Quebec City on April 8th, 1814. He worked from 1840 until his death on March 7th, 1841 in Halifax where he was interred. It is believed he was buried in the Poor House cemetery. French Auteur du premier roman canadien d’expression française, L’influence d’un livre (1837), rédige . . . — Map (db m77825) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Pier 21Canada’s National Immigration Museum — Musée national de l’immigration au Canada
English When the Canadian immigration complex known as Pier 21 closed its doors in March of 1971, it marked the end of a more than forty-year saga of human hope, vision, courage and resilience. From its opening on the Halifax waterfront in 1928 to its final months of operation, Pier 21 served as a bridge to new beginnings. More than a million immigrants, refugees, displaced persons and war brides passed through its transit shed on their way to becoming Canadian citizens. During the . . . — Map (db m77616) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Pierre Maillard
This plaque is dedicated to the memory of Pierre Maillard who served as missionary to the Micmac Indians in this country for over thirty years, who succeeded in reconciling the Micmac to British rule, who celebrated the first mass and opened the first Catholic Church in Halifax in 1759, who died on the twelfth day of August, 1762, and lies buried near this place. In memory of the Reverend John Enslow Burns Map (db m77723) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Province House
English Province House is an architectural monument and the setting for signifiant events in Canadian political life. Begun in 1811 and opened in 1819 as the seat of government for Nova Scotia, it is one of the finest Palladian-style buildings in Canada. Its symmetrical composition, harmonious proportions and refined interior detailing are distinguishing features of the classical architecture of Georgian England. Before Confederation, epic orations within these walls contributed to . . . — Map (db m77858) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Samuel Cunard1787-1865
A native son and a great Nova Scotian, he received his early training in this city and became a highly regarded merchant, humanitarian and ship owner. All this was a prelude to his most successful venture, the founding of the British and North American Royal Mail Steam-packet Company and its successor the Cunard Steam-ship Company. Aware of the need for a regular Transatlantic passenger and mail service, Cunard established a fortnightly sailing from Liverpool to Halifax, Boston and return, . . . — Map (db m77879) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Ships and Men of the Royal Canadian Navy
This memorial was erected by the Atlantic Chief and Petty Officies Association to commemorate the Ships and Men of the Royal Canadian Navy who failed to return through enemy action, stress of weather and accidents during The Battle of the Atlantic and to remind future generations of The Price of Victory They are one with the tides of the sea They are one with the tides of our hearts Dedicated in the fifty seventh year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II and the . . . — Map (db m77646) WM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — South African War Monument
Erected by the people of Nova Scotia in honor of those who served and in memory of those who fell in the South African Campaign 1898 - 1902 — Map (db m77859) WM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — St. Mary’s BasilicaLa Basilique St. Mary
English St. Mary’s holds a central position in the history of Roman Catholicism in Nova Scotia. Begun in 1820, the church demonstrated the enhanced ecclesiastical status of the province, which acquired its own Bishop in 1818, and witnessed enormous gains in the legal and social standing of Catholics. A major expansion and redecoration of the church between 1860 and 1874 reflected the growing confidence and importance of the Diocese. St. Mary’s, named a Basilica in 1950, is one of the . . . — Map (db m77721) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — The Grand DérangementGeorges Island - Halifax / Île Georges - Halifax
This monument/marker is made up of four panels, two in English and two in French. Each language has a panel dealing with The Grand Dérangement and Georges Island. On top is a large, round medallion featuring a map showing Acadian deportation routes. English The Grand Dérangement L’Acadie, established by France in 1604, was a strategically located and highly coveted colony. In 1713, it was handed over to England and renamed Nova Scotia. The foundation of Halifax, in . . . — Map (db m77625) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — The Old Burying GroundLe Vieux cimetière communal
English In this common burial ground lie many of the first citizens of Halifax, their descendants and men of the British Army and the Royal Navy who were stationed here. First opened in 1749, the year Halifax was founded, it was used until 1844. During that period, over 12,000 men, women, and children were buried here; fewer than 10% of their graves are marked. The graveyard was granted to St. Paul’s in 1793 and the church has maintained it ever since. Unfortunately, natural . . . — Map (db m77783) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — The Tall Ships Parade 2000Les Grands Voiliers 2000
English For five days beginning on July 20, 2000, Halifax harbour and waterfront was like no other place - wet or dry - on earth. The city was the sole Canadian host of the largest gathering ever of the world’s Tall Ships - majestic world-class symbols of a bygone Age of Sail. The visit marked the the North American terminus of an international, four-month transatlantic race that began in Southhampton (sic), England on April 19th and concluded in Amsterdam on August 24th. Vessels from . . . — Map (db m77741) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — The Welsford Parker MonumentLe Monument Welsford-Parker
English This monument was erected in 1860 in memory of Major A.F. Welsford and Captain W.B.C.A. Parker. These two Halifax men both perished during the Crimean War. In September of 1855 they participated in the assault on the Great Redan, part of the eastern defenses of Sebastopol. George Laing is credited with contracting this rare pre-Confederation war memorial. Laing also built the Federal Building in Halifax (now restored as the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia). Funds for the . . . — Map (db m77744) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — There Was Once a Very Special Ship
The ex-Admiralty ocean salvage tug FOUNDATION FRANKLIN sailed from the Foundation Maritime piers from the early 1930’s to 1948 on rescue and salvage missions in all kinds of weather, in peace and war to assist ships in distress on the great Western Ocean. This plaque is placed here by the Atlantic Chief and Petty Officiers Association to honor the memory of the vessel, her colourful Masters and crew an with respect to our brethren of Canada’s Merchant Navy. “Ah, me son” as on . . . — Map (db m77598) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — Why Aren’t We Americans? • Pourquoi ne sommes-nous pas des Américains?The Old Burying Ground Remembers The War of 1812-1814 • Le vieux cimetière souvient de la guerre de
This marker may be conveniently divided into three section; left, center and right. The center sections is presented first. Center section English We are not Americans because of the service men like the sailors and soldiers, casualties of the War of 1812, buried in this historic burying ground. They fought and died at sea and ashore to prevent the United States’ invasion and annexation of our country. French Grâce aux hommes comme les marins et . . . — Map (db m78073) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Halifax — York Redoubt
[English text] York Redoubt was the heart of the defences protecting the outer harbour approaches to Halifax. Begun in 1793, it was enlarged by the Duke of Kent who constructed a Martello tower here in 1798. The redoubt became an essential link in the communications system protecting the city against surprise attack. Its strategic importance was such that it was rebuilt in the 1860s and 1880s to mount more powerful guns. In the twentieth century York Redoubt became the tactical command . . . — Map (db m44479) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Peggys Cove — Swissair Flight 111 MemorialWhalesback
English text only shown The communities of Peggys Cove and Blandford were central to the recovery operation following the crash of Swissair Flight 111. The Whalesback and Bayswater Beach sites were chosen for their proximity to those communities because they have view lines to the crash site and each other. The three sites combined - Whalesback, Bayswater, and the actual crash site - make a triangular shape, which is reflected in the design of the memorials. Whalesback is at the . . . — Map (db m45717) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Peggy's Cove — Peggy's Cove
This picturesque village and lighthouse are among the most photographed places in Canada. A romantic folk tale is told about how the Cove got its name. Young Peggy was traveling to Halifax to meet her fiance when the ship she was in foundered on the rocks. She was rescued by local folk, and when visitors went to see her they would say they were going to see “Peggy of the Cove.” Collision of crustal plates beneath the ocean floor forced molten material to the surface, which . . . — Map (db m77937) HM
Nova Scotia (Halifax Regional Municipality), Peggy's Cove — Peggy's Cove
Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse Built in 1868, the first lighthouse at Peggy’s Cove consisted of a wooden house topped by a beacon, Each evening, the lighthouse keeper lit a kerosene oil lamp magnified by a catoptric reflector (a silver-plated mirror) creating the red light, which marked the eastern entrance to St. Margaret’s Bay. In 1914, an octagon-shaped lighthouse built of concrete and reinforced steel, standing nearly 15 m (50 ft.) high, replaced the old structure and is the very lighthouse . . . — Map (db m77939) HM
Nova Scotia (Lunenburg County), Bayswater — Swissair Flight 111 MemorialBayswater
English text only shown The communities of Peggys Cove and Blandford were central to the recovery operation following the crash of Swissair Flight 111. The Whalesback and Bayswater Beach sites were chosen for their proximity to those communities and because they have view lines to the crash site and each other. The three sites combined — Whalesback, Bayswater and the actual crash site — make a triangular shape, which is reflected in the design of the memorials. . . . — Map (db m47255) HM
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