Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Tennessee Historical Markers

3003 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 2753
 
Prelude: The Green McAdoo School Marker image, Click for more information
By Yugoboy, August 16, 2013
Prelude: The Green McAdoo School Marker
Tennessee (Anderson County), Clinton — Prelude: The Green McAdoo School
Freedman's Hill, or Foley Hill as it came to be known, has long been an educational site for the African American community, whether in the schoolhouse built by the Freedman's Bureau after the Civil War, later destroyed by fire, or the churches of . . . — Map (db m70646) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1D 24 — Elza GateThe Elza Gate
From April 1, 1943, until March 19, 1949, this was the site of Elza Gate. Elza Gate was the primary entrance to the secret community of Oak Ridge and along with six other entry points, it was manned by armed guards. Elza Gate took its name from a . . . — Map (db m88625) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — Erected in Memory of New Bethel Baptist Church
Opened 1851 - Closed 1942 Church building Stood 47 feet in front of this stone In Memory of our Dead And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes, and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither shall there be . . . — Map (db m70485) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1D 23 — Oak Ridge
In 1943, Oak Ridge was created as the residential center for the Clinton Engineering Works. Located on the northeast corner of a 59,000-acre reservation acquired by the government in 1942, the community was designed by Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill, . . . — Map (db m81358) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1D 34 — The Emery Road
On a route that was first authorized to be "cut and cleared" in 1787, the Rock Pillar Bridge 60 yards to the north-northeast was built in the early 1900's. This road became known as the Emery Road and was one of the earliest routes used in the . . . — Map (db m89677) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1D 27 — The Robertsville Community
The Robertsville Community was settled in 1804 by Collins Roberts, who had received a 4,000-acre land grant in this region. Robertsville was one of four communities in the area that predated Oak Ridge. The community was dispersed in 1942 when the . . . — Map (db m95701) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1D 29 — The Scarboro Community
The Scarboro Community was founded by three brothers in the early 1790s. Jonathan, David and James Scarborough traveled from Virginia and settled here. Scarboro was one of four area communities that predated Oak Ridge. The community remained largely . . . — Map (db m32575) HM
Tennessee (Anderson County), Oak Ridge — 1F 38 — The Wheat Community
The Wheat Community was settled during the middle of the 19th century and took its name from the first postmaster, Frank Wheat. The area had originally been known as Bald Hill. Roane College, a liberal arts college, operated here from 1886-1908. . . . — Map (db m88494) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Bell Buckle — 3G 27 — The Webb School
Founded 1870, at Culleoka, by William R. ("Sawney") Webb, whose brother John M. ("Old Jack") Webb joined him in 1874. It moved here in 1886. Its curriculum, embracing chiefly Latin, Greek and Mathematics, was designed to give a sound preparatory . . . — Map (db m24169) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 16 — Andrews' Raiders
On this knoll, members of the Federal party which attempted to destroy the Western & Atlantic R.R. in 1862, assembled before starting their foray. It started with seizure of the engine "General" and ended with recapture of the engine at the Georgia . . . — Map (db m80317) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 6 — Army of the CumberlandJune 27, 1863
The Reserve Corps (Granger) moved south along this road, screened by the Army's Cavalry (D.S. Stanley). Taking Guy's Gap, against minor resistance, they pushed rapidly into Shelbyville, evacuated the same morning by the Corps of Maj. Gen. Leonidas . . . — Map (db m26075) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Austin C. Shofner
Because Shofner and his compatriots brought home stark evidence of Japanese atrocities, the United States and their allies were compelled to alter their strategy in WWII. These reports of Japanese atrocities ignited an urgency to resolve the war . . . — Map (db m25051) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Bedford County, Tennessee Veterans Memorial Plaza
The Veterans Memorial Plaza is conceived and designed to honor, commemorate and forever remember the veterans of Bedford County Tennessee who have served in the armed forces throughout the world. It is to recognize the sacrifices these brave men . . . — Map (db m85709) WM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 23 — Church of the Redeemer
This was Lot 44 of the original town plan. A log church was built here in 1815. The Presbyterians used it, and built the present church in 1817. In 1856, a Catholic congregation bought the building, selling to the Northern Methodists in 1894. These . . . — Map (db m25049) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 29 — Clement Cannon, Sr.
Born in NC, 1783; veteran of the War of 1812; early Bedford County manufacturer; Whig political leader. In 1810 Cannon provided 100 acres of land for the site of the "Town of Shelbyville" and in 1817 donated 5 acres to Dickson Academy and a lot to a . . . — Map (db m26807) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 22 — Confederate Cemetery
In the cemetery north of the road are buried Confederate soldiers of the Army of Tennessee, who fell while opposing the advance of Rosecrans' Army of the Cumberland through Liberty Gap and Guy's Gap, in late June, 1863. Also buried here are soldiers . . . — Map (db m25864) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Fighting in ShelbyvilleRain, Muddy Roads, and Swollen Rivers — Tullahoma Campaign
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River ended on January 2, 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, Bragg's . . . — Map (db m85714) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 28 — Henry Brevard DavidsonJan. 28, 1831 - March 4, 1898
Born in a house which stood here. Enlisted in the 1st Tenn. Volunteers for the Mexican War; on graduation from US Military Academy in 1853, commissioned in Dragoons. Resigning for the Confederacy and rapidly promoted to colonel, he was captured at . . . — Map (db m85444) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — In Memory of the "Shelbyville Rebels" Co. F.
In memory of the "Shelbyville Rebels" Co. F. 41st Tenn. Reg't. C.S.A. and all soldiers from Bedford County who fought for the Confederacy in the War Between the States 1861-1865 Erected and affectionately dedicated by the Agnes L. . . . — Map (db m85555) WM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Martin Shofner1758 - 1838
Son of Michael, an immigrant from Frankfurt on Main, Germany in 1760. Migrated by covered wagon, horseback and afoot from North Carolina in 1808 with his family and settled this tract of land on Thompson's creek. The land was granted to him by the . . . — Map (db m80313) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 31 — Prentice Cooper1895-1969
Governor of Tennessee for three successive terms 1939-1945. A native of Bedford County and graduate of Webb School, Princeton and Harvard Law School, he was Attorney General of the 8th Judicial Circuit, a member of the 63rd and 70th General . . . — Map (db m25868) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Shelbyville, TennesseeCelebrating the First 200 Years
Shelbyville was established in 1810 on 100 acres of land donated by Clement Cannon (1783-1860), local manufacturer and veteran of the War of 1812. The city was named in honor of General Isaac Shelby (1750-1826), statesman and noted Revolutionary War . . . — Map (db m85443) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — 3G 37 — Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration
This 90-acre tract is home of the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration - "The World's Largest Walking Horse Show". On July 17, 1939, a non-profit association was chartered to conduct a national celebration to honor and exhibit the Tennessee . . . — Map (db m25869) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Tribute to Revolutionary War Veterans of Bedford County, Tennesee
To honor and commemorate the men who fought in the American Revolution and sleep in Bedford County — Map (db m85553) WM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Tribute to Veterans of Bedford County, Tennessee
In honored memory of the veterans of Bedford County, who died in W.W.II, the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam Conflict. — Map (db m85554) WM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Shelbyville — Tribute to World War I Veterans of Bedford County, Tennessee
. . . — Map (db m85711) WM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Tullahoma — 2E 24 — Moore County / Bedford County
Moore County Established 1871; named in honor of Major Gen. William Moore He settled in Tennessee in 1808, coming from Kentucky. Commanded a company in the Creek War; finished the War of 1812 as a Major General. Member of the State House . . . — Map (db m61915) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Wartrace — 3G 42 — Beechwood Plantation
The Beechwood Plantation house, which formerly stood at this site, was an important Confederate headquarters during the Tullahoma Campaign. It was built for Col. Andrew Erwin, Jr. and family in 1826. The Erwins, who were southern sympathizers, . . . — Map (db m25862) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Wartrace — 3G 34 — Strolling Jim
Strolling Jim, the first World's Champion Tennessee Walking Horse, is buried in a pasture directly behind the Walking Horse Hotel. Foaled in 1936, this former work horse was ridden to the championship by Floyd Carothers at the first Walking Horse . . . — Map (db m24165) HM
Tennessee (Bedford County), Wartrace — 3G 44 — Wartrace
In 1850, Rice Coffey gave eight acres to the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad on which the main line would run with a depot and freight house at the junction of the branch line to Shelbyville. In 1851, town lots were laid off. The following year, . . . — Map (db m88407) HM
Tennessee (Benton County), Camden — David Benton
Born 1779, South Carolina, died 1860, Benton County Tenn. Citizen soldier, War of 1812, member of Benton County's first quarterly court February 1836. Patriot for whom Benton County was named. Presented to the Citizens of Benton.

(Base monument) . . . — Map (db m74482) HM

Tennessee (Benton County), Camden — Fighting on the Tennessee RiverCavalry versus Navy
During the Civil War, several engagements occurred along the strategically important Tennessee River within about five miles of here. In each one, cavalrymen engaged naval forces. On April 26, 1863 near the mouth of the Duck River east of here, . . . — Map (db m74512) HM
Tennessee (Benton County), Camden — 4A 50 — Mary Cordelia Beasley-Hudson
Mary Cordelia Beasley-Hudson, a life-long resident of Benton County, was an advocate for women's suffrage. The Tennessee General Assembly approved an amendment to the state constitution to allow women's suffrage on April 15, 1919. Seven days later . . . — Map (db m81359) HM
Tennessee (Benton County), Camden — 4A 21 — Thomas Clark Rye
Born June 2, 1863, in a log cabin, about 1/2 mile N., he studied law at Charlotte, later began practice at Camden. Attorney General of the 13th Judicial District, 1908-12, he was the last Tennessee governor to be elected by a convention. Inaugurated . . . — Map (db m74481) HM
Tennessee (Benton County), Holladay — Fort JohnsonControlling the Tennessee River
Take Exit 133, State Route 191, and drive north to visit two state parks associated with the struggle to control the Tennessee River during the Civil War.      In 1861, the Confederates built Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River and Fort Henry on . . . — Map (db m96639) HM
Tennessee (Bledsoe County), Pikeville — 2B 24 — Bragg Invades Kentucky
On Aug. 29, 1862, the Army of Mississippi was enroute to Kentucky: Army Headquarters was near Dunlap; Col. Joseph Wheeler's Cavalry Brigade was moving against Maj. Gen. A McD. McCook's Federal Division at Altamont. Advance elements of Maj. Gen . . . — Map (db m81360) HM
Tennessee (Bledsoe County), Pikeville — 2B8 — Rhea County / Bledsoe County
(obverse) Rhea County Established 1807; named in honor of John Rhea Revolutionary veteran, who fought at King's Mountain. Delegate to the North Carolina Convention which ratified the U.S. Constitution; member of the Tennessee . . . — Map (db m63645) HM
Tennessee (Bledsoe County), Pikeville — 2B 21 — Sequatchie College
About 500 yds. NW. This school was the outgrowth of a community meeting at Bryant Camp Ground in 1858. War conditions delayed opening until 1865, with Prof. Gerry Rodgers first president. The first student body included both Confederate and Federal . . . — Map (db m57953) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Friendsville — The Underground RailroadFriendsville Quakers and Cudjo's Cave
Members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) came to Blount County in the 1790s looking for a place to worship in peace. Hardworking and industrious, opposing war and slavery, they developed the land and founded the prosperous settlements . . . — Map (db m81361) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Knoxville — 1E 18 — James Gillespy's Fort
About 2 miles northeast. Attacked Oct. 13, 1788, by 300 Indians under John Watts, the half breed. Defenders held out until ammunition was exhausted. 28 were taken prisoner; 17 slaughtered and bodies burned. Thereafter the locality was called the . . . — Map (db m90458) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 49 — Alleghany Springs
Yellow Sulphur Springs was developed on a modest scale by Jesse Kerr in 1859. In 1885, Nathan McCoy, of Indiana, built an elaborate hotel here. John Hanlon took it over in 1900, and operated it until the outbreak of World War I. It burned in 1933. — Map (db m58503) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 14 — Chilhowee
On Abram’s Creek, near the site of the early Cherokee village, Chilhowee, William and Robert James established a water-powered cotton and woolen spinning and weaving factory. A charter for the business was issued in 1846 and the mill was evidently . . . — Map (db m58501) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 104 — Freedman's Institute
A three-story brick building was erected 1872-74 on this site to train blacks as teachers. Institute was begun in 1867, in a log house ½ mile north, and later moved into a new building, financed mainly by friends. By 1879, it had trained 80 . . . — Map (db m81362) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — General Sam Houston
March 2, 1793 – July 26, 1863 Born In Rockbridge County VA Moved To TN in 1807 Taught At This Schoolhouse In 1812 Attended Porter Academy In 1813 Joined Army In 1813 In Maryville, TN Studied Law In Nashville, TN In 1818 . . . — Map (db m1733) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 5 — Houston's Station
Established by James Houston in 1785, it stood about 300 yards east on Little Nine Mile Creek. From here, in 1786, John Sevier led 160 horsemen against the Cherokee towns. In 1788, the Kirk family was massacred about three miles south; shortly . . . — Map (db m58500) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1 E 100 — John Craig's Fort
Site of the original settlement of Maryville. Here Captain John Craig in 1785 erected a fort on Pistol Creek to protect settlers from Indian raids. In 1793 as many as 280 men, women, and children lived within its walls for several months, surviving . . . — Map (db m58839) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 42 — Maryville College
Founded in 1819 by the Synod of Tennessee, Presbyterian Church in the USA, as The Southern and Western Theological Seminary, its first president was Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D. Its original buildings were on Broadway at College Street. Receiving its . . . — Map (db m36993) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — Maryville During the Civil War"A shameful...fire"
During the antebellum period, Blount County supported abolitionism. In 1822, local Quakers and other residents formed an abolitionist society, and in the decades following, local clergymen preached against the evils of slavery. When the county . . . — Map (db m69452) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1 E 56 — Montvale Springs
7 ½ mi. S, this resort was termed the Saratoga of the South in stagecoach days. First advertised in 1832; Daniel Foute, built a log hotel there in 1837. In 1853, Asa Watson, of Mississippi, built the Seven Gable Hotel. Sidney Lanier spent much . . . — Map (db m81363) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E46 — New Providence Church
This Presbyterian church was founded in 1786 by Rev. Archibald Scott, of Virginia. In 1792, Rev. Gideon Blackburn built a log church here; the stones in the present wall are from a church which replaced it in 1829; the brick church replaced it in . . . — Map (db m28733) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 55 — Pride Mansion
Dr. Samuel Pride, first Worthy Master of the New Providence Masonic Lodge, built his house here. Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, enroute to the relief of Burnside at Knoxville, billeted himself here. From 1878 to 1900 it was the Friends’ Normal Institute. . . . — Map (db m58509) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1 E 75 — Relief of Knoxville
Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, U.S.A., arrived in Blount County with 25,000 men, Dec. 5, 1863, to relieve Gen. Ambrose Burnside besieged at Knoxville by Gen. James Longstreet. The 15th Corps camped around Maryville, the 11th around Louisville and the 4th . . . — Map (db m58836) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 51 — Samuel Henry's Station
On the hill to the south, beside the Great War and Trading Path, later the Federal Road, Samuel Henry, Sr., built a fort by 1792. The half-breed John Watts and 200 followers attacked it in August, 1793. Henry’s first mill was authorized in 1795. He . . . — Map (db m58508) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E16 — Where Houston Enlisted
Here, where Blount County's first courthouse stood, Sam Houston "took a dollar from the drum", thus marking his first enlistment in the United States Army, March 24, 1813. This culminated in his command of the Army of Texas, which decisively . . . — Map (db m28579) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Maryville — 1E 109 — William Bennett Scott, Sr.ca. 1821 - 1885
William B. Scott, Sr., a free Black, migrated to East Tennessee in 1847 after increased racial tension in North Carolina. He made harnesses and saddles in Blount County’s Quaker community of Friendsville until the Civil War. In Knoxville, during the . . . — Map (db m81364) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Seymour — 1E 19 — Eusesbia Church
Early settlers coming down the Great War & Trading Path in 1784-85 camped here; it was the scene of their first death and burial. In 1786 the Rev. Archibald Scott of Virginia organized a Presbyterian congregation in the area; the church was built . . . — Map (db m81365) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Townsend — An Early Mountain Community
In the early 1900s family farms covered the valley. Self-sufficiency was the rule in those days, but most people made use of the mill, the country store, and the blacksmith shop. The buildings assembled here represent part of a typical mountain . . . — Map (db m58475) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Townsend — Civilian Conservation Corps
In Honor of the Civilian Conservation Corps 1933 – 1942 whose hands built roads, trails, bridges, buildings, campgrounds, and picnic areas in Great Smoky Mountains National Park for the benefit and enjoyment of the people. “If you . . . — Map (db m58440) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Townsend — 1E 13 — John Mitchel
This Irish patriot, exiled from his homeland for revolutionary newspaper activities, settled in the cove about two miles from here in 1855. After a short stay he moved to Knoxville. The rest of his life was taken up with lecture tours and newspaper . . . — Map (db m56818) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Townsend — 1E 110 — The Little River Lumber Company
This is the former site of the Little River Lumber Company mill complex. Founded in 1901 by Col. W.B. Townsend for whom this community is named, the company was one of the largest commercial lumber operations in the Smokies. From 1901 to 1939, the . . . — Map (db m36995) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Townsend — 1E 15 — Tuckaleechee Villages
Near here was one of these three Cherokee villages, unoccupied when settlers arrived about 1791. A branch of the Great War and Trading Path forked here, one to North Carolina, the other to villages on the Little Tennessee. The Virginia trader, . . . — Map (db m46477) HM
Tennessee (Blount County), Walland — 1E 48 — Gamble's Station
A mile north, on Little River, Josias Gamble built a fort in 1740. Gov. William Blount came here in 1790, to pacify and disperse a gathering of settlers about to attack the Indians to recover stolen horses. The fort was never attacked, but was a . . . — Map (db m46479) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Charleston — Charleston on the HiwasseeA Strategic Crossing
Charleston, formerly Fort Cass during the “Trail of Tears” (Indian removal of 1838), was strategically important in the military struggle for East Tennessee. The East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad bridge here, the line’s only crossing . . . — Map (db m69343) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Charleston — The Henegar House"A bird can't live here!"
During the war, Henegar House’s occupants, as in many other Tennessee homes, were divided in their loyalties. Henry Benton Henegar, the owner, was a Unionist while his wife, Margaret Lea Henegar, was a secessionist. Whenever Confederates occupied . . . — Map (db m69346) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — 2A 71 — "Chief Jack" Walker
Here stood the home of John Walker, Junior, known as “Chief Jack”. A grandson of Nancy Ward, he was prominent in the affairs of the Cherokee nation, belonging to the party advocating a voluntary treaty of removal of the Cherokees to the . . . — Map (db m81366) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — Cleveland During the Civil WarStruggle for Control
When the Civil War began, Cleveland was a divided community with most residents being sympathetic to the Union. Confederate troops occupied the area in 1861 to control the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad and to protect the vitally important . . . — Map (db m69342) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — 2A-92 — Cooper Cemetery
In 1873, Bennet Cooper (1797-1886) gave one-quarter of an acre of land for a family burying ground. His first wife, Lydia, was buried there along with several other family members. The cemetery is located on a ridge behind the Cooper Homeplace which . . . — Map (db m81367) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — Lee College
Since 1885 this campus has been dedicated to the purposes of Christian higher education. Lee College was founded by the Church of God as Bible Training School on January 1, 1918, on Caut Avenue in Cleveland. The school relocated in Sevierville in . . . — Map (db m49558) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — 2A 41 — Oak Grove Male Academy
Chartered Dec. 16, 1837, this was the first such institution in the Ocoee Purchase; here was its home during its entire existence. An early teacher (1843) was Henry von Aldehoff, a native of Prussia and graduate of Bonn University. This building was . . . — Map (db m49559) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — 2A 44 — Red Clay Council Ground
One mile west was this Cherokee council ground. Here was held the last council between the United States and the Cherokee nation, preceding the removal of the Indians to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. John Howard Payne, author of “Home, Sweet . . . — Map (db m49722) HM
Tennessee (Campbell County), Caryville — 1D 37 — Stone Millcirca 1900-1934
1.5 miles to the southeast on Cove Creek. Joel E. Stone built a dam, grist mill and a saw mill, which he and his family operated until 1934 when Norris Lake was raised. The mill served the surrounding area as a community center and whistle-stop for . . . — Map (db m74243) HM
Tennessee (Campbell County), Jellico — All Veterans Memorial
Tennessee Amvets dedicates this memorial to all veterans living or deceased who have honorably served their country that freedman may reign. Governor Don Sandquist — Map (db m74228) WM
Tennessee (Campbell County), Jellico — Civil War in TennesseeWar in the Mountains
Tennessee’s mountain residents were bitterly divided about secession in 1861, although most were Unionist. In Huntsville (Exit 141), Scott County residents voted to secede and join Kentucky if Tennessee joined the Confederacy. Confederate . . . — Map (db m74227) HM
Tennessee (Campbell County), LaFollette — Big Creek GapNatural Opening
The road in front of you winds through Big Creek Gap, one of the few natural openings through the Cumberland Mountains in the region. During the Civil War, this corridor was much narrower and steeper, and even lightly loaded wagons found travel . . . — Map (db m74229) HM
Tennessee (Cannon County), Woodbury — 2E 63 — "Mister Jim" Cummings
Born in Cannon County in 1890, James Harvey Cummings, known as “Mr. Jim”, was a farmer, attorney, politician, and statesman. Having served in the Tennessee General Assembly from 1928 to 1972, except for 1949 – 1953 when he was . . . — Map (db m60422) HM
Tennessee (Cannon County), Woodbury — 2E 1 — Cannon County/Warren County
Cannon County Established 1836; named in honor of Newton Cannon Governor of Tennessee, 1835–39; Member of Congress, 1814–17 and 1821–27; Served in Creek War and War of 1812. Warren County Established . . . — Map (db m60421) HM
Tennessee (Cannon County), Woodbury — 2E 14 — Early Industry
On Short Mountain, 7.1 mi., Henry Hoover & John Beeson established a millstone and grindstone factory in 1806. An inscription on a bluff of the mountain, and discarded fragments of stone mark the spot. — Map (db m60423) HM
Tennessee (Cannon County), Woodbury — 2E 16 — Forrest Rested HereJuly 12, 1862
Here Forrest, with his newly organized brigade of about 1400 cavalrymen, halted for a short rest before making his successful raid on Federal forces at Murfreesboro under Gen. T.L. Crittenden. He freed a number of hostages from this locality and . . . — Map (db m76173) HM
Tennessee (Cannon County), Woodbury — 2E 22 — The Trail of Tears
In the valley to the south, that part of the Cherokee nation which took part in the enforced overland migration to Indian Territory rested for about three weeks in 1839. About 15,000 persons of various ages took part in the march. Several who died . . . — Map (db m76174) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Atwood — 4A 17 — Carroll County
Established 1822: Named in honor of William Carroll An officer in the War of 1812; governor of Tennessee, 1821-27 and 1829-35; Served as governor longer than any other man. — Map (db m52132) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Atwood — 4A 17 — Gibson County
Established 1823; Named in honor of Colonel John Gibson who served with distinction under General Andrew Jackson in the Natchez Expedition, 1812 - 13, and in the Creek Wars. — Map (db m52134) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Atwood — 4A 34 — Gordon Browning1889 - 1976
Governor Browning was born in Carroll County. After graduating from Cumberland Law School in 1915, he began practicing in Huntingdon. He commanded Battery D, 114th Field Artillery in France in World War I. In 1922 he was elected to Congress and . . . — Map (db m51404) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Clarksburg — ClarksburgPrelude, Battle of Parker's Crossroads — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec 15, 1862-Jan 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s supply line between Columbus, Kentucky, and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m74967) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Hollow Rock — 4A 53 — Alexis de Tocqueville At Sandy Bridge
Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859), author of the classic Democracy in America, and Gustave de Beaumont (1802-1866) spent four frigid days and nights, December 12-16, 1831 at Sandy Bridge, now Hollow Rock. The postmaster, Zephaniah Harris, and . . . — Map (db m52647) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Hollow Rock — 4A 14 — Hollowrock Church
Founded in 1822, this Primitive Baptist Church has been in constant use. It holds an annual foot-washing ceremony the first Sunday in May, which is attended by communicants and witnesses from many parts of this and neighboring states. — Map (db m52585) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Huntingdon — 4A 27 — Isaac R. Hawkins
Born in Maury Co., he was an officer of volunteers in the Mexican War. A lifelong staunch Unionist, he was a delegate to the Constitutional Union Party convention of 1860, later an officer in the Federal Army. A delegate to the Republican convention . . . — Map (db m52608) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Huntingdon — 4A 9 — Nathan Nesbitt
Lived and is buried about 3½ miles southeast. On December 9, 1822, he made a trail through the woods to the new county seat, carrying a crosscut saw. Arrived at Huntingdon, he sawed a door in the new log courthouse and thus, as Chairman of the . . . — Map (db m52609) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Huntingdon — 4A 28 — Oak Hill Cemetery
Established in 1822, this cemetery contains the remains of soldiers from every major American war since the establishment of the state. Among those buried here are two from the War of 1812, three from the Mexican War, and thirty-eight from the Civil . . . — Map (db m51407) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Huntingdon — 4A 8 — Old Racetrack
Built about 1818 in the area to the east. Here also were held barbecues, barn dances, prize fights and cockfights. Here, according to court records, David Crockett “participated in an affray,” while attending the races. He was fined six . . . — Map (db m52584) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — 4A 22 — Bethel College
Founded as Bethel Seminary at McLemoresville in 1842 by the West Tennessee Synod, Cumberland Presbyterian Church, with Rev. Ruben Burrow principal. Incorporated in 1847, it became Bethel College in 1850 and moved here in 1872. It was presented to . . . — Map (db m52842) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — 4A 16 — Clear Lake
About 3 miles SE, the lake was discovered in 1785 by Henry Rutherford, who surveyed the majority of west Tennessee. It was orginally named Boyd's Lake, for the Rev. Adam Boyd, chaplin [sic] of the North Carolina Regiment in the Revolution, who later . . . — Map (db m81368) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — 4A 11 — Forrest's RaidDec. 24, 1862
Moving to McKenzie, Forrest's Brigade captured the 100 - man garrison. Here they spent Christmas Eve, while working parties completed destruction of 4 miles of trestles and bridge between the forks of the Obion River. Other parties completed . . . — Map (db m52174) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — Harris-Collier-Holland FarmOne Family's Story
Albert Gallatin Harris purchased this farm in 1829 and built the present house in 1857. After camping on the land during the Civil War, Union troops ransacked the farm, killing or stealing all the livestock. They did not burn the house because the . . . — Map (db m74514) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — 4A 46 — James Monroe McKenzie1818 - 1873
James Monroe McKenzie, entrepreneur and philanthropist, was born in February 12, 1818. In 1860 he donated land for the depot and freight office where the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad crossed the Memphis and Ohio Railroad, resulting in the . . . — Map (db m81369) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — McKenzie's StationA Strategic Junction — Forrest's First West Tennessee Raid
(preface) Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest led his cavalry brigade on a raid through West Tennessee, Dec. 15, 1862-Jan. 3, 1863, destroying railroads and severing Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's supply line between Columbus, Kentucky, and Vicksburg, . . . — Map (db m74532) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McKenzie — 4A 43 — Webb School
Originally founded in 1923 as the black "County Training School" at Smyrna, Tennessee. It was moved to McKenzie in 1927, and named "Webb High School" in honor of John L. Webb. With over 1900 alumni, this school, under the leadership of J. L. Seets . . . — Map (db m52177) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McLemoresville — 4 A 13 — First County Court
The home of R.E.C. Dougherty stood on the foundations of the house to the north. Here, as Chairman, he held the first meeting of the Carroll County Court, March 11, 1822. Members were, Daniel Barcroft, John Bone, Banks W. Burrow, Edward Gwin, John . . . — Map (db m51405) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), McLemoresville — 4 A12 — Forrest's RaidDec. 29, 1862
Forrest's Brigade, re-armed, and re-equipped with material and horses captured from the Federal storehouses which they had plundered, passed through here enroute to Lexington and their re-crossing of the Tennessee River at Clifton. — Map (db m51406) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Trezevant — 4A 33 — Christmasville
First used as Post No. 2 by the 1785 surveyors, a town was later established on November 14, 1823, at John Christmas McLemore's Bluff, on the South Fork of the Obion River. Goods were shipped down the river until 1854. Buckeye Point, 1 mile east, . . . — Map (db m52130) HM
Tennessee (Carroll County), Trezevant — 4A 35 — Hillsman House
On the old McKenzie Road one mile north stands the historic home of Major Jack Hillsman, Civil War veteran, son of pioneer Reddick Hillsman from North Carolina who helped organize Carroll County in 1821. The two-story house, completed in 1869, was . . . — Map (db m52192) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 123 — Carter County's Train History
Carter County’s railroad history is the story of three trains – the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina, better known as Tweetsie (1881-1951); the Southern Railroad (1911-1940); and the North American Rayon Steam Engine (1936-1992). The . . . — Map (db m46561) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 119 — Cedar Grove Cemetery
Cedar Grove Cemetery was originally established as a "colored cemetery" in the early nineteenth century on a tract of land adjacent to a trail that became known as Gap Creek Road. The remote and rocky terrain often required the use of dynamite to . . . — Map (db m81370) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 62 — Covered Bridge
This bridge over Doe River was built early in 1882 at a cost to the county of $3000 for the bridge and $300 for the approaches. The site was chosen by J.J. McCorkle, Wiley Christian and H.M. Rentfro. The committee were Thomas E. Matson, Engineer, . . . — Map (db m46706) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 54 — Duffield Academy
These stones are from the foundation of the academy established Sept. 13, 1806, with Maj. George Duffield, Chairman, Nathaniel Taylor, George Williams, Alexander Doran & John Greer, Trustees. In 1807, Andrew Taylor, Abraham Henry and Reuben Thornton . . . — Map (db m46607) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 61 — Green Hill Cemetery
The Tipton family cemetery, it stood near the homesite of Samuel Tipton (1752-1833) and Susannah Reneau (1767-1853). Col. John Tipton, father of Samuel, deeded it to him in 1784. The house was later the home of a nephew, Isaac P. Tipton, whose . . . — Map (db m81371) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1 A 15 — Sabine Hill
Built about 1818 by Mary (“Polly”) Patton Taylor, widow of Gen. Nathaniel Taylor, of the War of 1812. Both are buried in the cemetery nearby. Among their great-grandsons were Governors Alfred A. and Robert L. Taylor, of Tennessee, and . . . — Map (db m46387) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 72 — Samuel Powhatan CarterAug 6, 1819 – May 26, 1891
Born in this house. After attending Washington College and Princeton, graduated from U.S. Naval Academy; serving in the Navy until May 1, 1862, he was appointed brigadier general, U.S. Volunteers. His most conspicuous service was a raid into East . . . — Map (db m46749) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 16 — Sycamore Shoals of the Watauga
In this neighborhood, on Sept. 26, 1780, Rev. Samuel Doak conducted religious services for the frontiersmen from Virginia and North Carolina, including the Watauga and other settlements in what is now Tennessee, upon the start of their decisive . . . — Map (db m47152) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 19 — The Mansion
“The Mansion” was built before 1780 by John Carter and his son Landon. John Carter was chairman of the Watauga Association, a court of five men elected by the settlers of the Watauga Count in May 1772, “to govern and direct for the . . . — Map (db m47102) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 52 — Transylvania Purchase
In this valley, March 17, 1775, the Transylvania Company, led by Richard Henderson, John Williams and Nathaniel Hart, bought from the Cherokee, led by Chief Oconostota, all the lands between the Kentucky and Cumberland Rivers. Over 20 million acres . . . — Map (db m47196) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 8 — Watauga Fort
400 yards northward and ½ mile northeast of the mouth of Gap Creek, stood Watauga Fort. Here, July 21, 1776, the settlers under Captain James Robertson repulsed the Cherokees under Old Abraham of Chilhowee, and Lt. John Sevier rescued . . . — Map (db m47187) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Elizabethton — 1A 53 — Watauga Purchase
Here, March 19, 1775, at the Sycamore Shoals, the Watauga Association, Charles Robertson, Trustee, bought from the Cherokee, with Oconostota as chief, lands along the Watauga, Holston and Great Canaway (now New) Rivers. The consideration for the . . . — Map (db m47180) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Johnson City — 1A 31 — Carter County / Washington County
[Front]
Established 1796 named in honor of Landon Carter Treasurer of Washington and Hamilton Districts. Speaker of the first State of Franklin Senate, later its Secretary of State, also Lieutenant Colonel of the Washington . . . — Map (db m45948) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Johnson City — 1A 17 — Dungan’s Mill
6.5 miles northwest, at the mouth of Brush Creek, is a mill built by Jeremiah Dungan in 1779, and continuously operated since then. East of it was a stone fort erected by pioneers of the Watauga Settlement.
Dungan and other pioneers are buried . . . — Map (db m45997) HM
Tennessee (Carter County), Watauga — 1A 108 — Range School
Range School was in operation prior to Oct. 29, 1843. It began as a common school with classes held in a log sheep barn donated by Jonathan Range. In 1901, a one-room frame building was constructed near the original site. A brick building was . . . — Map (db m53528) HM
Tennessee (Cheatham County), Kingston Springs — Connection To JohnsonvilleU.S. Military Railroad
In November 1863, Federal troops occupied Kingston Springs to serve as headquarters for the supervisors of the U.S. Military Railroad Construction Corps. They oversaw the construction of this section of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad. When . . . — Map (db m69365) HM
Tennessee (Chester County), Henderson — 4C 25 — Cox's RaidOctober 25, 1862
Attacking this place at dawn, the Confederate cavalry battalion of Maj. N.N. Cox killed one Federal soldier, captured three officers and 33 enlisted men of "B" Co., 49th Illinois Infantry, and dispersed the rest. They burned the railroad station and . . . — Map (db m84787) HM
Tennessee (Chester County), Henderson — 4C 29 — Freed-Hardeman College
The campus includes the sites of predecessors Henderson Male and Female Institute (1869-1885), West Tennessee Christian College (1885-1897), Georgie Robertson Christian College (1897-1907), and National Teachers Normal and Business College . . . — Map (db m84788) HM
Tennessee (Chester County), Jacks Creek — 4C 31 — Jacks Creek
The Jacks Creek community was settled in the 1820s in Henderson (now Chester) County. It furnished men to the 13th Infantry, 18th Newsome's and 21st Wilson's Calvary units, C.S.A., and was the site of a skirmish 1 mi. N on Sept. 12, 1863, and an . . . — Map (db m84789) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Cumberland Gap — Daniel Boone's TrailFrom North Carolina to Kentucky — 1769
Map (db m80240) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Cumberland Gap — 1D13 — Harrow School
Founded by Rev. & Mrs. A. A. Myers in 1890. First classes held in basement of Congregational Church on site of present Cumberland Gap School; later moved 1/2 mile west to Harrow Hall. Operated as a division of its successor, Lincoln Memorial . . . — Map (db m80233) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Cumberland Gap — Iron Furnace
From the early 1820s to the 1880s, an iron smelting business here took advantage of the rushing waters of Gap Creek. Today only the creek and part of the original 30-foot-high stone tower remain, a small part of an industrial complex of buildings, . . . — Map (db m81372) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Cumberland Gap — 1D14 — Three States Cornerstone1 1/2 mi.
The cornerstone for Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee is on Three States Peak. The first Virgina - North Carolina (later Tennessee) boundary at this point was surveyed in 1779 by Dr. Thomas Walker and Col. Richard Henderson. The present line and . . . — Map (db m80235) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Cumblerland Gap — 1D8 — Cumberland Gap
First explored, 1750; Long Hunters used it until 1760, and Daniel Boone in 1769, cutting the Wilderness Trail through it in 1775. Hosts of pioneers followed even before the road was built in 1796. Postal service was established in 1795 and a post . . . — Map (db m80232) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Harrogate — Lincoln And Cumberland GapPassage to the West
Cumberland Gap became the principal passage between the eastern and western theaters of operation in the Upper South during the war. Whichever side held the high ground here held the Gap. In 1861, Confederate Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer's men . . . — Map (db m35761) HM
Tennessee (Claiborne County), Harrogate — 1D 36 — Lincoln Memorial University
"If you come through this misery alive... I want you to do something for all those mountain people who have been shut out of the world all these years." These words of President Abraham Lincoln to General O. O. Howard in 1863 proved to be the . . . — Map (db m35760) HM
Tennessee (Clay County), Celina — 2D 42 — Butler's Landing / Bailey Butler
Butler's Landing Daniel Boone, on his trip to the Western Territory in 1773, followed the old game and Indian trail to where two creeks flowed into the Cumberland River. He referred to them as the Twin or Double Creeks in his journal. On this . . . — Map (db m74336) HM WM
Tennessee (Clay County), Celina — Celina During the Civil WarHamilton's Tennessee Cavalry Battalion
During the Civil War, the residents of the eastern and Cumberland River sections of present-day Clay County (then part of Jackson and Overton Counties) were usually Confederate sympathizers, while those in the western section supported the Union. . . . — Map (db m74297) HM
Tennessee (Clay County), Celina — Dale Hollow DamOn Obey River
Constructed and operated by Corps of Engineers Department of the Army.

This is one of a series of dams in the Cumberland River Basin for flood control, power, navigation and water conservation.

Height of dam - 185 ft. Length of dam - . . . — Map (db m91771) HM

Tennessee (Clay County), Celina — 2D 31 — Free Hill(s) Community
Free Hill(s), a historic Black community, was established northeast of Celina before the Civil War by former slaves of Virginia Hill. Hill brought her slaves from North Carolina to then Overton County, purchased 2,000 hilly and rough acres, settled . . . — Map (db m74274) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Del Rio — 1C 22 — Grace Moore
Born in a house which stood just across the creek, on Dec. 5, 1901, she was educated at Ward Belmont College, in Nashville, and after further musical study in Washington and New York, she became one of the outstanding operatic sopranos of her day. . . . — Map (db m40736) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Del Rio — 1C 73 — John Floyd Arrowood1891-1925
Born two miles west April 1891, Arrowood was one of the first American soldiers to be decorated for bravery in World War I. The French government, on Nov. 14, 1917, awarded him the Croix de Guerre for the rescue of several men under his . . . — Map (db m40735) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Del Rio — 1C2 — Tennessee / North Carolina
(obverse) Tennessee Cocke County Established 1797, named in honor of SENATOR WILLIAM COCKE (1796, 1797, 1799 to 1805) An officer of the Revolutionary Army; one of the leaders of the State of Franklin and member of the . . . — Map (db m40739) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Newport — 1C 57 — Governor Ben Walter Hooper
Born in Newport on October 13, 1870, Hooper was a successful Cocke County attorney. He was elected governor and served two terms, 1911-15. His election is attributed to the influence of fusion, the coalition of the prohibition factions of both . . . — Map (db m61778) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Newport — 1C34 — Jefferson County / Cocke County
Side A * Jefferson County * Established 1792: named in honor of Thomas Jefferson Secretary of State; formerly member of the Continental Congress; principal author of the Declaration of Independence; later Governor of . . . — Map (db m81373) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Newport — 1C20 — Kiffin Yates Rockwell
Born in a house 500 yards south, he attended W & L University and V.M.I. Enlisted in the French Foreign Legion, August, 1914: incapacitated for infantry service by wounds, May 1915. Transferring to the French Air Force, he helped found the . . . — Map (db m28228) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Newport — 1C 66 — The War Ford
Located .2 mi. east on the Big Pigeon River is a strategic crossing used by the Cherokees. In Aug. 1782, Gen. Charles McDowell of Burke Co., North Carolina, raised an army of five hundred mounted militia from Morgan District to cross the mountains, . . . — Map (db m61779) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Newport — 1C 19 — Whitson’s Fort
About 2 miles northeast, south of the mouth of Cosby’s Creek, William Whitson, Jr., established a fort on the east bank of Pigeon River in 1783. It was an important frontier outpost, since there was a ford there, and the west bank of the river was . . . — Map (db m58404) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Parrottsville — Johnson's Parrottsville SlavesOrigin of Tennessee Emancipation Day
In 1842, state senator Andrew Johnson, a resident of neighboring Greene County, purchased his first slave here in Parrottsville. Her name was Dolly, and she was fourteen. Her son claimed that she approached Johnson and asked him to buy her because . . . — Map (db m92476) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Parrottsville — 1C 64 — Swaggerty Fort
This fort, one of only two known remaining blockhouses in Tennessee, was built about 1787 by James Swaggerty for protection from the Indians. Located on land of his Uncle Abraham Swaggerty, it consists of three levels. The cantilevered structure was . . . — Map (db m61780) HM
Tennessee (Cocke County), Parrottsville — The Hanging of Peter ReeceSwift Retribution
During the Civil War, both Union and Confederate forces accused each other of committing atrocities against prisoners and civilians. The hanging of Peter Reece, a Unionist who lived near present day Harned Chapel United Methodist Church, illustrates . . . — Map (db m87171) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 18th Indiana Battery
Hoover's Gap, TN. June 24, 1863. The 18th Indiana Battery, commanded by Capt. Eli Lilly, dislodged one Confederate artillery piece and forced the Confederate batteries to change position. The battery, along with Wilder's Brigade, did considerable . . . — Map (db m81374) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 20th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
. . . — Map (db m30694) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 2E 40 — Beech Grove Engagement
On June 24, 1863, Union forces under Rosecrans overpowered Confederate defenders on Hoover's Gap, commanded by Stewart, Bate, and Bushrod Johnson. This was the beginning of Bragg's withdrawal to Chattanooga. Unknown soldiers who fell in the battle . . . — Map (db m26052) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — Confederate Cemetery
Originally the site of a pioneer cemetery, many early residents are buried here. In 1866, returned Confederate soldiers, under the leadership of Maj. William Hume and David Lawrence, collected and reinterred here the bodies of soldiers who fell at . . . — Map (db m24162) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 2E 6 — Fort Nash
Near here, on Garrison Fork, this fort was established, about 1793, for the protection of settlers and travelers to and from the southwest. Until its abandonment, about 1804, it was an important stopping place and administrative center. — Map (db m26050) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — General A. P. Stewart's DivisionMonument at Beech Grove, Tennessee
(Front):General A.P. Stewart Stewart's Division 2nd Army Corps (Hardee) Army of Tennessee CSA Dedicated 24th Day of April 2010 By Benjamin F. Cheatham Camp 72 Sons of Confederate Veterans Manchester, Tennessee (Reverse):Battle of . . . — Map (db m30698) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — General Forrest's Farewell Order MemorialUnknown Confederate Soldiers Memorial
Forrest's Farewell Order to his Cavalry Corps ExtractGainesville, Ala., May 9, 1865 Civil war, such as you have passed through, naturally engenders feelings of animosity, hatred, and revenge. It is our duty to divest ourselves of all such feelings, . . . — Map (db m30715) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — 2E 41 — Henry Watterson
Born in Washington, Feb. 16, 1840, where his father, Harvey Magee Watterson, was in Congress, he spent most of his boyhood in a house 100 ft. W. Subsequently Confederate soldier, journalist and political leader, he founded the Louisville . . . — Map (db m81375) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Beech Grove — Pledge to the South
The South is a land that has known sorrows; it is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; a land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; but a land of legend, a land of song, a . . . — Map (db m24167) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Corporal Brian James Schoff
Nov. 27, 1983 to Jan. 28, 2006 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment 101st Airborne Division "Operation Iraqi Freedom" "Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you: Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your . . . — Map (db m83224) WM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 45 — Experiment in Armor
Hereabouts, on June 20, 1941, Maj. Gen. George S. Patton, Jr., personally led his 2nd Armored Division across several fords of Duck River, quickly surrounding and defeating his maneuver opponents in the Manchester vicinity, thus proving that modern . . . — Map (db m24968) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 47 — General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold
General "Hap" Arnold, WW II Commander of the Army Air Forces, is commemorated by the Air Force research and development installation bearing his name. In 1944, he directed long range planning for air research and development to maintain this . . . — Map (db m25920) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Granny Hickerson Cemetery
This cemetery was established in the early 1800's, by the burial on this spot of David Hickerson and his wife Nancy Hickerson. It has been known throughout the years as the Granny Hickerson Cemetery, though members of other families are also known . . . — Map (db m69657) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 5 — Old Stone Fort
About 1/2 mi. S.W. are remains of stone fortification and moat of ancient and unknown origin. One theory is that it was built by a party of 12th Century Welch voyagers who entered the country via the Gulf of Mexico. Near here also was the capital of . . . — Map (db m24967) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — 2E 46 — Pioneer Armored Maneuvers
Maneuvering in this vicinity, June, 1941, the 2nd Armored Division, USA, commanded by Mag. Gen. George Smith Patton, Jr., gave the first demonstration in America of the mobility and decisive power of armor in large-scale combat operations. Maneuver . . . — Map (db m24969) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — The Civilian Conservaton Corps
The Civilian Conservation Corps was launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt April 5, 1933 as a lifeline for undernourished sons of the Great Depression. Each company consisted of about 200 men who were housed in Tennessee barracks under the . . . — Map (db m81376) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — Anatomy of a Campaign
In late June of 1863, Union Major General William S. Rosecrans launched a massive offensive from his base in Murfreesboro in an attempt to drive Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s 43,000-man Army of Tennessee from its entrenchments at . . . — Map (db m75354) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Manchester — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1862 — The Confederate War Industry
When Manchester was founded in the late 18th century, local lore has it that the town, named for Manchester, England, was destined to become an American version of this powerful industrial city. The Duck River falls, it was noted, would provide an . . . — Map (db m75355) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 12 — Army of Tennessee
Withdrawing to this area after the Battle of Murfreesboro, Gen. Braxton Bragg established his command post near here. Other units went into defensive winter quarters at Bell Buckle, Shelbyville & Wartrace. Here they remained until late June, 1863, . . . — Map (db m81378) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 72 — Baillet Sisters
Jane (Jennie) Baillet 1834 - 1918 Emma Adell Baillet 1838 - 1926 Affa Ann Baillet 1850 - 1934 This house was the home of Jane, Emma, and Affa Baillet whose family purchased the property . . . — Map (db m81379) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 34 — Camp Forrest
Originally established in 1926 for training the Tennessee National Guard, this became a Federal training area, Jan. 10, 1941. It was named for Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest, CSA. Units training here included the 8th, 33rd, 79th & 80th Inf. Divs., 17th . . . — Map (db m24446) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Camp Forrest Monument
Camp Peay 1926 - 1940 Camp Forrest 1940-1946 Arnold Center 1949 Tullahoma, Tenn A tribute to the men and women who trained and worked at Camp Forrest and contributed significantly to victory in World War II. — Map (db m24430) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2 E 19 — Coffee County / Franklin County
Coffee County Established 1836; named in honor of Major General John Coffee Soldier, surveyor and close friend of Andrew Jackson. Tennessee troops under his command took a decisive part in the New Orleans Campaign, December 23, 1814 to . . . — Map (db m81380) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 44 — Confederate Cemetery
1 mile SW are buried 407 unknown Confederates. Many of these died in one of the hospitals established here when Tullahoma was headquarters for the Army of Tennessee during the first six months of 1863, following the Battle of Murfreesboro and . . . — Map (db m24296) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Confederate Memorial
On this ground are buried 407 unknown Confederates. Many of these died in one of the hospitals established here when Tullahoma was headquarter for the Army of Tennessee during the first six months of 1863. Following the Battle of Murfreesboro and . . . — Map (db m75311) HM WM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Fortress TullahomaStrategic Rail Center — Tullahoma Campaign
(preface) After the Battle of Stones River ended on January 2, 1863, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans occupied Murfreesboro. Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew south to the Highland Rim to protect the rail junction at Tullahoma, Bragg’s . . . — Map (db m81382) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 11 — Isham G. Harris
Born near here, 1818. Was the only governor of Confederate State of Tennessee. In Congress 1849-51; elected governor, 1857-59-61. When U.S. forces captured Nashville, joined staff of Army of Tennessee for remainder of War. Fled to Mexico, 1865; . . . — Map (db m61914) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — 2E 56 — James W. Starnes
South of here, at Bobo's Crossroads, Col. Starnes, 4th Tennessee Cavalry, CSA, then commanding Forrest's Old Brigade, was killed in a skirmish while his brigade was screening the withdrawal of the Army of Tennessee from Tullahoma to the Chattanooga . . . — Map (db m24188) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Maplewood Confederate CemeteryHallowed Ground
Tullahoma was the headquarters and logistics center of the Confederate Army of Tennessee for the first six months of 1863 after the Battle of Murfreesboro. At least three hospitals here treated soldiers wounded during Gen. Braxton Bragg’s 1862 and . . . — Map (db m75310) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Rangers2nd Ranger Bn         5th Ranger Bn
On January 8, 1943 2nd Army commenced an intensive training course to train Rangers at Camp Forrest. Tennessee. The 2nd Ranger Battalion was formed on April 1, 1943 by Lt. Col. W. C. Saffrans. Later these Rangers were trained and led by Major J. . . . — Map (db m24433) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — The Red Caboose
The car displayed here is a side bay window model caboose built in 1964 by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad at the company’s South Louisville yards. The exterior is restored to the original L & N red. The purpose of a caboose was to provide . . . — Map (db m75318) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — From Contraband to United States Colored Troops
No sooner did the North begin its invasion than slaves fled to Union lines seeking freedom. This presented problems for military commanders and President Lincoln. The political aims of the war did not initially include emancipation. Before Lincoln’s . . . — Map (db m75324) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — Anatomy of a Campaign
In late June of 1863, Union Major General William S. Rosecrans launched a massive offensive from his base in Murfreesboro in an attempt to drive Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s 43,000-man Army of Tennessee from its entrenchments at . . . — Map (db m75325) HM
Tennessee (Coffee County), Tullahoma — Tullahoma CampaignJune 24-July 4, 1863 — Race to Tullahoma
When the Union Army of the Cumberland captured Manchester on June 27th, Braxton Bragg’s Confederate forces retreated here to Tullahoma - a supply base and Army of Tennessee headquarters since January, 1863. Tullahoma, however, was tactically a . . . — Map (db m81383) HM
Tennessee (Crockett County), Alamo — 4D 38 — Robert H. White, Ph. D.(1883 - 1970)
Robert H. "Bob" White was born in Crockett County 10 miles west of this site. He served 15 years as Tennessee's first official State Historian. He had previously served as a college teacher and a consultant to many departments of state government as . . . — Map (db m52977) HM
Tennessee (Crockett County), Bells — 4D 29 — Cherryville
3½ miles west, this town, first called Harris' Bluff, later Harrisburg, was the first to be incorporated (Oct. 18, 1821) in west Tennessee. In 1833, the electors for the surrounding four counties delivered their returns here. Industries . . . — Map (db m52999) HM
Tennessee (Crockett County), Gadsden — 4D 30 — First Strawberries
Coming to this region from his native Maryland in 1867, David Brandenburg established here the first large-scale strawberry-growing operation in Tennessee. The industry has now become an important factor in the produce economy of the mid-South. — Map (db m53032) HM
Tennessee (Crockett County), Maury City — 4D 36 — Thomas Conyers, Sr.1757 - 1847
One mile due north is the grave of this veteran of the Revolutionary War who enlisted in 1776, wintered at Valley Forge, served in numerous battles, afterwards fought Indians, and was honorably discharged at Pittsburgh. He moved to what is now . . . — Map (db m56291) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crab Orchard — 2C 12 — Thomas "Big Foot" Spencer
Thomas Sharp Spencer first visited Middle Tennessee in 1776. In the spring of 1778 he became the first Caucasian to clear land, build a cabin, and grow corn in the area. The following winter he resided in a giant hollow sycamore tree south of . . . — Map (db m84367) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — Cumberland County at WarDivided by Conflict
Divided loyalties in Tennessee produced a bitter and violent Civil War experience in Cumberland County, the only county that did not report a vote either for or against secession. Confederate supporters joined Co. B, Lt. Col. Oliver P. Hamilton’s . . . — Map (db m69232) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — Cumberland County's First Steam Engine
This engine was brought to Cumberland County from Indianna by Samuel Cline about 1872. It powered a sawmill and grist mill at what was then Northville. Donated to Cumberland County by Mason Hatfield in 1956. — Map (db m69300) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Crossville — 2 C 20 — Kemmer Stand / Tavern
In 1817, John Kemmer purchased land here and built Kemmer Stand, a wayside inn, at the intersection of Burke Road. It was two-story, two-section structure that housed many travelers traversing the Cumberland Plateau. At the crest of this hill lies . . . — Map (db m18194) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Pleasant Hill — Affair at Cumberland MountainA Brief Fight
Less than half a mile west of here, on the Lewis Whitaker farm, the only engagement of the war in Cumberland County between regular Union and Confederate troops took place on December 9, 1863. Several companies of Col. Thomas J. Jordan’s 9th . . . — Map (db m69228) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Pleasant Hill — 2C 11 — Pleasant Hill
Pleasant Hill Was incorporated in 1903. Pleasant Hill Academy, a secondary school, was founded here in 1884 by the American Missionary Association of the Congregational Churches to provide an education for the young people of the Cumberland Plateau. . . . — Map (db m69229) HM
Tennessee (Cumberland County), Pleasant Hill — The Journey of the BellPioneer Hall Museum — Revere and Sons Bell
1817 Cast by Revere and Sons, Boston, Massachusetts 1817-1824 Hung in steeple of 2nd Congressional Church, Marblehead, Massachusetts 1825-1886 Placed in Old North Congregational Church, Marblehead 1886 Purchased by J.J,H. Gregory . . . — Map (db m69230) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Brentwood — 3A 21 — Hood's RetreatDec. 16, 1864
In this neighborhood, late in the evening of his decisive defeat at Nashville, Hood reorganized his army for withdrawal southward. Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee's Corps, supported by Chalmers' Cavalry Division, covered the withdrawal, fighting . . . — Map (db m54043) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 19 — Alexander Wilson
In the spring of 1810, Alexander Wilson, noted author, naturalist, and known as the "Father of American Ornithology", visited this area while on a horseback trip over the Natchez Trace to the Mississippi River. While here he lodged with the pioneer, . . . — Map (db m83282) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3B 23 — Casper Mansker1746–1820
Two blocks west is the grave of this renowned frontiersman and Goodlettsville’s first citizen. Coming first to the Cumberland Settlements in 1770, he returned in 1780 and built his fort one-half mile north on Mansker’s creek. He repeatedly fought . . . — Map (db m2428) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 204 — Goodlettsville Cumberland Presbyterian Church
In 1843, Goodlettsville Cumberland Presbyterian Church was organized near Mansker Creek and was originally known as Mansker Creek Congregation. In January 1848, the church moved to the present location and burned in 1901. The present edifice was . . . — Map (db m2583) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 72 — Mansker’s First Fort
Here on west bank of the creek that he discovered in 1772, Kasper Mansker and other first settlers built a log fort in 1779. John Donelson’s family fled here in 1780 for safety from Indians. Mansker abandoned the fort in 1781 and moved to Fort . . . — Map (db m2586) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 14 — Mansker’s Station
Here, near Mansker’s Lick, Casper Mansker established a station of the Cumberland Settlements in 1780. The road connecting with Nashboro was built in 1781. John Donelson and his family moved here after abandoning his Clover Bottom Station, following . . . — Map (db m2375) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 15 — Old Stone Bridge
Immediately to the east is one of the stone bridges over which passed the old stage road from Nashville to Louisville. The stage line operated until the rail-road was completed in 1859. — Map (db m83281) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Goodlettsville — 3A 146 — William Bowen HouseCirca 1787
Near Mansker’s Creek stands a rare example of Federal architecture built by Capt. William Bowen and Mary Henley Russell. Bowen, an early pioneer and Indian fighter had served in the French & Indian and Revolutionary wars before moving his family to . . . — Map (db m85438) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hendersonville — Davidson County/Sumner County
Davidson County. Established 1783; named in honor of Brig. Gen. William Lee Davidson of North Carolina. Distinguished officer in the revolutionary War. Served with the Army at Valley Forge. Killed in action at Cowan’s Ford, N.C., 1781. . . . — Map (db m2374) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — "Have the Negro Houses Placed Where the Old Ones Stands"
When Jackson's plantation turned a profit in the 1820s, he invested it in slaves and buildings. Letters sent from Jackson to Andrew Jackson Jr. and his overseer in 1829 show that brick was being made for new buildings. In September 1829, Andrew . . . — Map (db m85383) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — “A Being so Gentle And Yet So Virtuous”Rachel and Andrew’s Tombs
Rachel Jackson quietly suffered through Jackson’s bid for the White House, as his enemies attacked the circumstances of their marriage. Although Jackson easily won the presidency, Rachel dreaded the gossiping whispers of Washington’s social circles. . . . — Map (db m81403) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A Future President's HomeFrom Adversity, Strength
Andrew Jackson took on life with grit and determination. Both served him well. Through persistence, ambition, and luck, the boy born into a struggling immigrant family and orphaned at age fourteen, would become a respected lawyer, judge, . . . — Map (db m81404) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A home for Jackson’s Slaves1821-1865
Andrew Jackson arrived at the Hermitage in 1804 with nine slaves. By 1821, that number had risen to fifty. In 1823, Jackson brought another thirty enslaved African Americans here from his recently sold Alabama plantation. Faced with pressing . . . — Map (db m81405) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A Landscape Of InequalityEnslaved Life at The Hermitage
The idyllic planter’s life presented to white visitors by the Jackson family was based on the unpaid labor of over 150 enslaved black men, women, and children. Without the grueling labor of these individuals, the Jackson family could not have lived . . . — Map (db m52407) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — A Lively PlaceFinding Strength in Family and Community
For nearly thirty years – from the construction of the brick dwellings in 1829 to the sale of this parcel of land in 1856 – the Field Quarter was home to at least eight enslaved families at The Hermitage. With fifty to eighty . . . — Map (db m85429) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Abandonment and PreservationStories Lost, Then Found Again
In the years after Andrew Jackson’s death, the Jackson’s financial situation changed for the worse. The log farmhouse/slave cabin slowly fell into ruin. In 1889, the state of Tennessee entrusted the property to the Ladies’ Hermitage Association. . . . — Map (db m81406) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Alfred’s CabinA Life of Toil
While the bold and dramatic claim center stage, history is also written in the quite, humble ways...and lives. Alfred Jackson was unique among the enslaved at The Hermitage. Born at The Hermitage to Betty, the cook, and Ned, the carpenter, Alfred . . . — Map (db m81407) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Cabin-by-the-Spring
In 1940, The Ladies' Hermitage Association constructed this building to be used for meetings and receptions. Today, the cabin still serves as a meeting place and classroom, and is also rented for private functions. — Map (db m85380) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Civil War at The HermitageA President's Home in Wartime
Although no Civil War battles were fought here, the war touched Andrew Jackson's farm in other ways. Jackson had been a firm Unionist, putting down Nullification and its potential for civil war during his presidency. However, after his death, his . . . — Map (db m85365) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Determined ResistanceFighting for Freedom
In spite of the threat of violence, the men, women, and children who Andrew Jackson held in bondage still found ways to fight against the injustice and inhumanity of slavery. There were several instances of slaves running away. Jackson family . . . — Map (db m85475) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Explore The Hermitage Grounds
From this point, you have many tour options inviting you to think about another time here at this 1120–acre National Historic Landmark. Use the map to guide you to any of the many points of interest you’ll find throughout Andrew Jackson’s . . . — Map (db m85369) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Field Quarter Trail
This path leads to the Field Quarter, an area that was once home to at least eighty enslaved African–Americans. A series of illustrated signs near exposed building foundations at the site help you to “see” what life was like for . . . — Map (db m81410) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Field Quarter Trail
This path leads to the Field Quarter, an area that was once home to at least eighty enslaved African-Americans. A series of illustrated signs near exposed building foundations at the site help you to "see" what life was like for this part of the . . . — Map (db m85379) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Ginning and Pressing "King Cotton"Wealth Created by Enslaved Hands
Andrew Jackson built a cotton gin and press at The Hermitage in 1807, both of which stood in the field in front of you. It was a shrewd decision on Jackson's part, not only making his plantation more self-sufficient, but also generating additional . . . — Map (db m85479) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Growing CottonA Risky Venture
Andrew Jackson called it his farm, but in reality, The Hermitage was a large cotton plantation dependent upon enslaved labor. All the agricultural activities on Jackson’s 1000 – acre plantation supported his cotton. On average, Jackson’s . . . — Map (db m81422) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Icehouse
The Hermitage icehouse, a common feature on larger farms and plantations during the nineteenth century, stood on the north side of the smokehouse. Archaeological excavation at this site in 1993 uncovered a portion of a 20 by 20 foot . . . — Map (db m85480) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Land Conservation at The HermitagePrescribed Grazing Plan
Prescribed grazing at the Hermitage improves forage, animal, soil, and water resources. Animal resources are improved by striving to maintain quality forge 3” to 8” tall. This height allows graze animals to have optimum intake. . . . — Map (db m81424) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Land Conservation at The HermitageNative Warm Season Grasses Plan
Native warm season grasses grow well during the summer heat. These are bunch type grasses, and the bare ground between the grass clumps provides wildlife cover and nesting space. Habitat conditions are excellent for species such as bobwhite quail, . . . — Map (db m85446) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Property, Family, Humanity
For the Jackson family, the enslaved were property and the foundation of their wealth. The monetary value of the enslaved far exceeded the combined worth of the Hermitage land, mansion and other improvements. Andrew Jackson himself had no . . . — Map (db m52412) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — Stories Told by Things the Enslaved Left Behind
Artifacts found during excavations of the Field Quarter have much to say about daily life within the Hermitage enslaved community. Animal bones tell us a great deal about diet. Buttons and sewing equipment provide details about clothing. Marbles, . . . — Map (db m85445) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Architectural Evolution Of The HermitageA Matter of Style and Substance
Like its landscape, so too have the homes of the Hermitage been touched by time and circumstance. Andrew and Rachel Jackson's first Hermitage home was a substantial and well-furnished two-story log farmhouse, where they lived from 1804 until well . . . — Map (db m85367) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Belted Galloway
The Belted Galloway is an heirloom breed of beef cattle originating in the mountainous region of Galloway in southwestern Scotland. A hardy breed, they are naturally polled (hornless) and are distinguished by their thick heavy coats and white belt . . . — Map (db m81425) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Field QuarterLives of Labor
In 1806, Andrew Jackson purchased 640 acres north of the first Hermitage and in turn used this land mostly for field crops such as cotton and corn. Jackson chose this portion of that land to build dwellings for his field slaves because of its . . . — Map (db m85432) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Field Quarter SpringNourishing Body and Spirit
Known as “Muddy Spring” in Andrew Jackson's time, this fast flowing spring was the primary source of water for the fifty to eighty enslaved men, women, and children who lived in the nearby Field Quarter. Along with its life-sustaining . . . — Map (db m85382) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The First HermitageWorlds Apart, Side by Side
These log buildings tell a remarkable American story unlike any other. From 1804 to 1821, as a two-story farmhouse and kitchen outbuilding, the First Hermitage housed future United States President Andrew Jackson and his family. Here, Jackson lived . . . — Map (db m52420) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Garden Privy
This small brick privy or necessary is something of a mystery. No documents or illustrations record the presence of such a building when the Jackson family lived on the property. Archaelogical evidence suggests that an older building may have stood . . . — Map (db m85374) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — 3A 13 — The Hermitage
Home of Andrew Jackson (1767~1845), Major General in the Army, hero of the Battle of New Orleans, and seventh President of the United States. It was originally built in 1819; partially burned in 1834, during Jackson's second term, replaced by the . . . — Map (db m36280) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage GardenAn Ever Changing Delight
As with all living things, the Hermitage Garden cannot be wholly defined by any particular moment in time. Gardens grow and change. Few records tell us about the appearance of the garden Andrew Jackson enjoyed. Jackson hired gardener William Frost . . . — Map (db m85370) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage Landscape1804-1821
At a time when limited resources led to smaller dwellings, the distinctions between indoor and outdoor life blurred. When Jackson lived in the log farmhouse, this area buzzed with dawn-to dusk activity, sounds and smells. Cramped housing for white . . . — Map (db m81426) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage LandscapeFrontier Farm to Cotton Plantation to Shrine
At first glance, The Hermitage Landscape may seem largely untouched by time. Look more closely, however, and discover the changes brought by over 200 years of labor...living...and a changing America. White Americans and their slaves first . . . — Map (db m85360) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage MansionSymbol of Democracy?
Elegant as it is, The Hermitage Mansion is also a prime example that, indeed, beauty sometimes does lie “in the eye of the beholder.” Andrew Jackson's visitors got their first good look at his home as they rounded the graceful curves of . . . — Map (db m85366) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hermitage OverseerBetween Two Worlds
As was common at large plantations, Jackson hired a white overseer on an annual contract to supervise farm operations, particularly the lives and work of the enslaved. The overseer's contract began on January 1, after the previous year's crop had . . . — Map (db m85477) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Hunter’s Hill Farm Building
This log building was not part of Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage. In 1929, a fire destroyed one of Jackson’s original barns. To help replace it, The Ladies’ Hermitage Association purchased and moved this log building from the nearby Hunter's Hill . . . — Map (db m52416) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Jackson Family Cemetery
Andrew Jackson's strong sense of family extended beyond those he embraced during his lifetime. Reaching into the future to touch generations yet to come, he deeded a small portion of the garden in trust to serve as a family cemetery. Stones . . . — Map (db m85372) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The North Cabin
The remains of the North Cabin stood near this spot until 1988 when it was dismantled because of structural instability. The foundation of the chimney is the only part of the building visible. The North Cabin was a one-story log dwelling with a . . . — Map (db m85478) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The SpringhouseWater for The Hermitage
Of all the enticements Tennessee offered settlers, one promised both survival and a future: Water. Falling from above, bubbling up from below, flowing in broad river “highways”: Water. Two natural free-flowing springs made The . . . — Map (db m81428) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The TriplexReclaiming the Past
Rarely do facts alone uncover the past. Scholarship, judgment, and analysis all have roles in interpreting evidence, and hints, of long-ago lives. So it is with these stones marking the location of a building that Hermitage archaeologists have named . . . — Map (db m52410) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The War Road
In 1915, The Ladies' Hermitage Association planted this double line of trees to serve as the border for a new entryway intended for visitors arriving by automobile. Each tree came from a battlefield where Andrew Jackson fought, such as the Plain of . . . — Map (db m85363) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Hermitage — The Work YardThe World Behind the Mansion
The stately trees and park-like grounds of today’s Hermitage bear scant resemblance to the working plantation of Andrew Jackson’s time. As the farm developed, trees were cleared to make room for fields and pastures. By the time the first . . . — Map (db m52408) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 122 — Academic Building At Fisk University
The Academic Building at Fisk University was designed by Nashville architect Moses McKissack and was made possible by a gift from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. On May 22, 1908, William H. Taft, later 27th President of the United States, laid the . . . — Map (db m4511) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 64 — Adolphus Heiman1809 - 1862
Born Potsdam, Prussia. Came to Nashville 1838. Lived in home on this site. Architect, Engineer & Builder; Designed Univ. of Nash. Main Bldg., Central State Hosp. Main Bldg., Suspension Bridge over Cumberland River. Masonic Leader; Adj. U.S. Army . . . — Map (db m4512) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 122 — Albertine Maxwell
Regarded as the symbol of dance in her adopted hometown of Nashville, Ellen Albertine Chaiser Maxwell (1902-96) operated the Albertine School of the Dance (1936-80). She had danced with Chicago Opera, Adolf Baum Dance Co., and Ruth St. Denis Dance . . . — Map (db m24195) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Alvin C. York
Front: Armed with his rifle and pistol his courage and skill, this one Tennessean silenced a German Battalion of 35 machine guns, killing 25 enemy soldiers, and capturing 132 in the Argonne Forest of France, October 8, 1918

Right side: . . . — Map (db m86362) HM

Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Andrew JacksonJackson.
Born March 15, 1767 Died June 8, 1845 Seventh President of the United States 1829-1837 Commander of victorious American forces at Battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815 This equestrian statue by Clark Mills was erected by the Tennessee . . . — Map (db m85487) HM WM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — Andrew Johnson1808-1875
17th President of the United States of America 1865-1869 — Map (db m85485) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 108 — Anne Dallas Dudley
1876-1955 Anne Dudley played a significant role in the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment by the State of Tennessee. A native of Nashville, she served as president of the Nashville Equal Suffrage League, 1911-15; president of the . . . — Map (db m4524) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 3A 153 — Arna Wendell Bontemps1902 - 1973
At this site lived Arna W. Bontemps, one of the most prolific contributors to the Harlem or Negro Renaissance. From 1943 to 1965, Bontemps, an award-winning poet, playwright, novelist, biographer, historian, editor, and author of children's books, . . . — Map (db m4959) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 10 — Assault on Montgomery HillDec. 15, 1864
500 yards east of here, Maj. Gen. T. J. Wood led an assault by his IV Corps against the Confederate skirmish line on the hill, eventually carrying it. Attacking the main line about 600 yards south, Wood was unable to take it by direct assault, the . . . — Map (db m52302) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 73 — Assumption Church / Cardinal Stritch
(Assumption Church side): Nashville’s second oldest Catholic church, dedicated Aug. 14, 1859, its rectory on right was added in 1874, school on left in 1879. The present altar, windows, and steeple were added later. The Germantown . . . — Map (db m4517) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 17 — Battle of NashvilleLee's Position — Dec. 15, 1864
Here, Stephen D. Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee, bestrode the highway and railroad. Cheatham's Corps held the right of the line, which ran northeast about 2 miles to Rain's Hill. After the Confederate left was broken in the afternoon's fighting, . . . — Map (db m52849) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 6 — Battle of NashvilleTaking of Redoubt No. 5 — Dec. 15, 1864
Hood's Redoubt No. 5 was on this hill. Couch's Division of the XXIII Corps, sweeping to the south of the route of Smith's XVI, captured it and the hills to the east late in the afternoon. Wilson's cavalry, crossing the highway about 2 miles south, . . . — Map (db m53357) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — 126 — Battle of Nashville(December 16, 1864) — Assault on the Barricade
During the retreat from Nashville, Colonel Edmund Rucker's brigade attempted to block the Union pursuit by erecting a barricade of fence rails and logs across Granny White Pike, 1/2 mile south of this spot. During the ensuing night attack by Union . . . — Map (db m60230) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N2 4 — Battle of NashvilleConfederate Defenses - Dec. 16, 1864
Lee's Corps held the right flank of the line in the final stages of the battle, linking with Stewart to the west. Here it extended east, then south around Peach Orchard Hill. Violent attacks by Steedman's brigades were repulsed bloodily: Lee did not . . . — Map (db m81429) HM
Tennessee (Davidson County), Nashville — N1 3 — Battle of NashvilleFederal Defenses
The hill to the west was a strong point in the system of permanent Federal defenses, started in 1862, which extended to the river on both sides of the town. Artillery was emplaced here from time to time. — Map (db m84792) HM

3003 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers were listed. Next 2753
Paid Advertisement