Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Virginia Historical Markers

7565 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 7365
 
Accomack County Courthouse and Lawyer's Row image, Click for more information
By Beverly Pfingsten, April 20, 2008
Accomack County Courthouse and Lawyer's Row
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — Accomac Historic District
Has been registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark pursuant to the authority vested in the Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission Act of 1966. — Map (db m7827) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — Accomack County Virginia World War I
In honor of the men of Accomack County, Virginia who died in the service of our country in the World War 1917-1918. — Map (db m7825) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — Accomack County Virginia World War II, Korea & Vietnam
In honor of the men of Accomack County, Virginia who died in the service of our country in World War II, The Korean war and the Vietnam War. — Map (db m7826) WM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — EP 21 — Birthplace of Governor Wise
Here stood the birthplace of Henry Alexander Wise (1806-1876), Governor of Virginia (1856-1860) and general in the Confederate States Army. A talented orator and debator in an age of great orators, Wise was elected to six terms in Congress. He . . . — Map (db m7823) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — WY 19 — Debtors Prison
Built in 1783 in one corner of the jailyard to serve as a residence for the jailer, the building served in this capacity for 41 years. Iron bard, oak batten doors and locks were added in 1842 when it was converted into a prison for debtors in . . . — Map (db m7828) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — Elijah BakerPioneer Baptist of the Eastern Shore of Virginia
who landed at Hunt's Point, Old Plantation Creek, on Easter Sunday 1776 and the same day preached the first Baptist sermon, “At the End of a Horsing Tree.” Opposition of the established church caused him to be deported; but kind . . . — Map (db m71852) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — Makemie Statue
The Presbyterian Historical Society of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania erected this monument and dedicated it on May 11, 1908, at Makemie Park on Holder Creek where Francis Makemie is buried at his Pocomoke home. In 1984 the monument was moved here and . . . — Map (db m7829) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Accomac — EP 22 — Mary Nottingham Smith High School
The first high school for blacks in Accomack County was dedicated on this site in 1932. It was named in honor of Mary Nottingham Smith (1892-1951), a black educator who dedicated her life to educating all young people. In 1956, the school was . . . — Map (db m7822) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Belle Haven — WY 13 — Occohannock Indians
The Occohannock Indians, one of the important Virginia Indian groups on the Eastern Shore, were composed of several tribes including the Onancock, Machipongo, Metomkin, Chincoteague, Kegotank, Pungoteague, Chesconessex, and Nandua. Capt. John Smith . . . — Map (db m71855) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — Assateague Light House
Assateague Light House Rebuilt 1866-1867 Light House Board Acts of Congress June 20, 1860 and July 28, 1866 — Map (db m98850) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — Captain Timothy Hill House
Built circa 1800 is registered as a Virginia Historic Landmark and placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior 2011 — Map (db m59833) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — Christ Sanctified Holy Church1892 - 1984
Was established on this island on February 14, 1892 by Joseph B. Lynch, not far from this location. Doctrine is Justification and Sanctification. This building was erected in 1903. Since this beginning churches are established throughout the . . . — Map (db m59834) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — Keeping the Forest Full of Life
Keeping the Forest Full of Life Wildlife have the same basic needs humans do—food, water, shelter, and space. To make sure those needs are met, refuge staff carefully manage forest areas. They remove some trees, plant others that are . . . — Map (db m98827) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — Still Shining...After All These Years
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Assateague Island Lighthouse is a striking landmark that attracts many visitors. At the same time, it is an active aid to navigation, operated by the U.S. Coast Guard, that gives ships a visual . . . — Map (db m98824) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — The Wild Ponies
Hardy, compact, and spirited—the horses on Assateague Island run freely over a range bounded by ocean and bay. Bands of mares and young led by protective stallions graze on marsh grasses, drink at freshwater ponds, and retreat into island . . . — Map (db m98826) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Chincoteague Island — Welcome to Assateague Village
In the 1800s, after the lighthouse was built, a small community grew up not far from here. By the early 1900s, about 225 lived in the village, which included a school, dry goods store, and a church. The residents harvested resources from the sea, . . . — Map (db m98825) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Exmore — WY 13 — Occahannock
Five miles west is "Hedra Cottage", site of the home of Colonel Edmund Scarborough (Scarburgh), surveyor general of the colony. Beyond, at the end of Scarborough's Neck, was the village of the Occahannock Indians, the seat of Debedeavon, the . . . — Map (db m7608) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Keller — WY-17 — “The Bear and the Cub”
This first play recorded in the United States was presented August 27, 1665. The Accomack County Court at Pungoteague heard charges against three men “for acting a play,” ordered inspection of costumes and script, but found the men . . . — Map (db m7613) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Keller — WY 16 — Oak Grove Methodist Church
Two miles east, on Route 600, meets what is possibly the nation's oldest continuous Sunday School. Begun by William Elliott in his home in 1785, it was moved in 1816 to Burton's Chapel and in 1870 to the present church. — Map (db m7615) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Onancock — Genl. Edmund R. Bagwell
Born June 2, 1840. Died June 13, 1876. His life was gentle and the elements So mixed in him that Nature might stand up And say in all the World. This was a man. — Map (db m7678) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Onancock — Historic Cemetery
Known as the Scott Hall Cemetery, it dates from the late 18th century. Here will be found the grave of Commodore Whaley of the Maryland Navy who was killed in the Battle of the Barges in the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of Onancock Creek in . . . — Map (db m7681) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Onancock — Hopkins and Sons; Hopkins and Brothers
Records of this mercantile business date back to 1842. This store also served the community as a bank and as a social and political meeting place. Deeded in 1970 to Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. — Map (db m7675) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Onancock — Kerr Place
An eighteenth century mansion acquired in 1950 by the Eastern Shore of Virginia Historical Society as headquarters for the society. — Map (db m7682) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Onancock — WY 14 — Onancock
Two miles west is Onancock, founded in 1680. A courthouse was then built and used for a few years. Militia barracks were there in the Revolution. From Onancock, Colonel John Cropper went to the aid of Commodore Whaley in the last naval action of the . . . — Map (db m7673) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Onancock — World Wars I and II
Dedicated to the men and women from Onancock and community who devotedly served their country during World Wars I and II — Map (db m7677) WM
Virginia (Accomack County), Pungoteague — WY 18 — “The Bear and the Cub”
Probable site of Fowkes’ Tavern where this first recorded play in English America was performed August 27, 1665. — Map (db m7611) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Chesapeake House
The famous Chesapeake House occupies two old island homes. Hilda Crockett opened the business in 1944 in the Peter Crockett House with four guest rooms and a dining room on the porch. She expanded by purchasing the Nathan Rayfield House where the . . . — Map (db m39952) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Dr. Copter — Flying Medicine to TangierDavid Buell Nichols, MD — Feb 18, 1948 – Dec 30, 2010
Every week for more than thirty years Dr. David Buell Nichols made the voyage from Hummel Field in Middlesex County to Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay to administer health care to those in need. For an island with no resident doctor, the sound . . . — Map (db m97803) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — First Mobile Home
The former Noble Dise Store was replaced with the island's first mobile home in 1959. Manufactured homes remain popular today, but require a community-wide effort to move one into place after being delivered to the island by barge. — Map (db m39950) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Former Site of New Testament Congregation
In 1946, this building served as the first meeting place of the New Testament Congregation. It was vandalized several times during a rather contentious time in the island's religious history, a story reported in Newsweek, 1947. Throughout the . . . — Map (db m39682) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Q-83 — Fort Albion
In April 1814, during the war of 1812, British forces commanded by Adm. Sir George Cockburn established Fort Albion on the southern tip of Tangier Island. The fort, which included barracks a hospital, a church, parade grounds, and . . . — Map (db m97720) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Gladstone Memorial Health Center
Dr. Charles Gladstone (1880 - 1968) was Tangier's longest serving doctor. He arrived in 1918 and was always on call. Monthly, he would go door-to-door to collect his flat fee of $1.50 but would accept whatever the family could afford. This monthly . . . — Map (db m39684) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Ice Cream StandSite of Tangier's only unsolved murder
This is the site of the island's only unsolved murder. Charles C. "Bud" Connorton, the Town Sergeant, was eating in an earlier building here when he was fatally shot through an open window. His assailant was never identified. — Map (db m39555) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Lee’s Bethel
This cemetery is the possible site of Lee’s Bethel, the island’s first church. Next to the cemetery is the last of the island’s once plentiful garden farms. Tangiermen were famous for growing melons, filling their boats until just the gunnels . . . — Map (db m97873) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Methodist Parsonage
The Methodist Parsonage, the home of the resident Reverend and his family, was erected in 1887. It is the only house on the island with a basement and the first to have an indoor bathroom. It was the first house to have chain link fence, . . . — Map (db m39949) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Swain Memorial United Methodist Church
The most prominent of the island's buildings, Swain Memorial United Methodist Church is easily recognized as the focal point of Tangier. Built in 1899 on the site of the island's second church (1842), it is the center of the Tangier's religious . . . — Map (db m39998) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Tangier Harbor
Mailboat Harbor replaced Steamboat Harbor in the 1930’s as the age of steamboats came to a close. The harbor was first dredged in 1922, from the Eastern side. In 1967, the harbor was dredged through to the Western side of the island. This was a . . . — Map (db m39554) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Q-7-a — Tangier Island
The island was visited in 1608 by Captain John Smith, who gave it the name. A part was patented by Ambrose White in 1670. It was settled in 1686 by John Crockett and his sons’ families. In 1814, it was the headquarters of a British fleet ravaging . . . — Map (db m46705) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Telephone Office, Post Office & Myrt’s
The Telephone Building was built in 1966 by Grover Charnock when radiotelephones were finally replaced with a microwave tower. In front of this is a new home, built on the site of the former Grand Theater, built in 1929 by Gordon Daley, . . . — Map (db m97690) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — The Connorton House
The Connorton House was the home of the town Sergeant, Bud Connorton. On Sunday April 11, 1920, Sergeant Connorton shot and wounded 17 year old Roland Parks. He was trying to enforce a town ordinance that forbade "loafing on store porches and . . . — Map (db m39954) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — The Doctor's House
The Doctor's House was owned consecutively by doctors Samuel Oglesby, William Daisey, Bache Gill, and Charles Gladstone. Dr. Gladstone never lived there, but boarded next door in the Sidney Crockett House. Dr. Gladstone's former office still . . . — Map (db m39951) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — The Double Six
The Double Six Sandwich Shop is where the watermen meet at 3:00 AM for "smokes and coffee" before heading down to the docks to the day's work. Named for the game of Dominos, the shop is open for sandwiches year-round, and was often considered a . . . — Map (db m39683) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — WY-22 — The Parson of the Islands
Joshua Thomas (1776–1853) became a skilled waterman from the in his youth and ferried clergymen from the mainland to the islands of the Chesapeake Bay. He converted to Methodism about 1807, was licensed as an exhorter (or lay preacher) . . . — Map (db m97688) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — The Peter Dise House
The Peter Dise House is one of the oldest on the island and was moved from the "Uppards," the now unoccupied marsh north of the harbor. There were originally four fresh water wells on the island, two on Maine Ridge, one on Canton Ridge and one on . . . — Map (db m39953) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Tangier — Welcome To Historic Tangier Island
For almost 250 years the people of Tangier have wrested a living and a lifestyle from the waters that surround them. Most of their days have been occupied with family, work, church, and the other normal pursuits in which we all engage. But they have . . . — Map (db m97723) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Temperanceville — Anne Makemie Holden
Honors Anne Makemie Holden Landowner, successful business woman manager, champion of American Independence. Daughter of Naomi and Francis Makemie, founder of organized American Presbyterianism Presented June 17, 1998 by Virginia Business and . . . — Map (db m7835) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Temperanceville — WY 15 — Founder of Presbyterianism
Five miles west was the home of the Rev. Francis Makemie, founder of Presbyterianism in the United States. About 1684, Makemie established in Maryland the first Presbyterian Church. Later he moved to Accomac and married. He died here in 1708. — Map (db m7830) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Temperanceville — Francis Makemie Monument
Erected in Gratitude to God And in grateful, remembrance of his servant and minister Francis Makemie, who was born in Ramelton, County Donegal, Ireland, A.D. 1658(?) was educated at Glasgow University, Scotland, and came as an ordained Evangelist to . . . — Map (db m7838) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Temperanceville — Makemie Monument Park
Welcome to Makemie Monument Park Designated as A Virginia Historic Landmark September 6, 2006. And placed on the National Register of Historic Places February 15, 2007. — Map (db m7833) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Temperanceville — This Memorial Pyramid
Commemorates the belief that in this ancient family cemetery were buried near the remains of Francis Makemie, those of his wife Naomi, his daughters Elizabeth and Madame Anne Holden, and his father-in-law, William Anderson. Also those of John . . . — Map (db m7840) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Wallops Island — WY 12-a — NASA Wallops Flight Facility
The Wallops Island Flight Facility was established in 1945 by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and is one of the oldest launch sites in the world. This facility was built to conduct aeronautical research using rocket-propelled . . . — Map (db m63666) HM
Virginia (Accomack County), Wallops Island — Welcome to the NASA Visitor Center
The visitor center displays NASA’s past, present and future projects, as well as, Wallops flight facility’s role in Aeronautical and Space research. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops flight facility was established in 1945, and is one . . . — Map (db m95122) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Afton — Z-20 — Nelson County / Albemarle County
Nelson County. In the foothills of Virginia’s Piedmont, Nelson County was formed in 1807 from Amherst County. The county was named for Thomas Nelson, Jr., governor of Virginia from June to November 1781. The county seat is Lovingston. The . . . — Map (db m4030) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Batesville — GA-40 — Staunton and James River Turnpike
The Staunton and James River Turnpike ran through here at Batesville and stretched for 43½ miles from Staunton to Scottsville. Construction began in 1826 and was completed by 1830. The turnpike provided a direct route for Shenandoah Valley . . . — Map (db m21696) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Brownsville — The Rothwell Family ... / Elisha Wm. Robertson ...
The Rothwell Family of Albemarle County Virginia. Claiborne one of the first of the Rothwells to live in this county, was born about 1741 as reported in The Virginia Advocate, Saturday Oct. 11, 1828 and “died on Oct. 6 in his 87th . . . — Map (db m3996) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 165 — Advance Mills
Villages such as Advance Mills were once common features of rural Virginia, serving as economic and social centers. Advance Mills grew around a single mill that John Fray constructed in 1833 on the north fork of the Rivanna River. By the twentieth . . . — Map (db m55785) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Albemarle Barracks Burial Site
"In 1779 4,000 prisoners, British and their German auxiliaries, captured at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, marched over 600 miles to quarters, called 'The Barracks', situated a half mile north of this site. Traditionally, some of these prisoners . . . — Map (db m37586) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Z-15 — Albemarle County / Greene County
Albemarle County. Albemarle County was formed in 1744 from Goochland County and named for William Anne Keppel, the second Earl of Albemarle, titular governor of Virginia from 1747 to 1754. A portion of Louisa County was later added to Albemarle . . . — Map (db m21585) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Ash Lawn - Highland
Ash Lawn - Highland Home of James Monroe from 1799-1823 Dedicated on July 20, 1985 by Virginia Daughters of the American Revolution State Regent Mrs. G.E. Honts, Jr. — Map (db m63671) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Barrier
In 1814 a ditch 500 yards long was dug to keep grazing animals off the west lawn. The rails that were laid across the banks reminded a visitor in 1823 of "a common post and rail fence, blown down across a ditch." — Map (db m100002) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — 11 — Charcoal
Wood charcoal fueled the forges in the nailery on Mulberry Row and heated the stoves in the kitchen. Charcoal was stored under lock and key in wooden sheds that once stood here. Built about 1794, these "coal sheds" likely resembled temporary . . . — Map (db m100442) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-199 — Clark’s Birthplace
A mile north was born George Rogers Clark, defender of Kentucky and conqueror of the Northwest, November 19, 1752. — Map (db m17271) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 166 — Convention Army The Barracks
In Jan. 1779, during the American Revolution, 4,000 British troops and German mercenaries (commonly known as “Hessians”) captured following the Battle of Saratoga in New York arrived here after marching from Massachusetts. It was called . . . — Map (db m55784) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Discovering Mulberry Row
Mulberry Row’s buildings have all but disappeared—only the remains of four survive. Before re-creating lost buildings and roads, we look at information from many sources. How do we know about this important place and the history of its people, . . . — Map (db m80863) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Q-38 — Dogwood Vietnam Memorial
The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial, a project of the Charlottesville Dogwood Festival, Inc., was conceived late in 1965 after news arrived of the first casualty of the Vietnam War from this area. Consisting of a plaza with a plaque and flagpole, the . . . — Map (db m102815) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — 04 — Horses & Mules
The Eagle. Peacemaker. Tecumseh. Bremo. Wellington. Diomede. These were the six carriage and saddle horses, plus one mule, stabled here in 1821. As many as 30 riding and carriage horses, workhorses, and mules were stabled at various locations on the . . . — Map (db m100157) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Ice House — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Master carpenter James Dinsmore oversaw construction of this Ice House to Jefferson's design in 1802. Enslaved and hired workers filled it each year between November and February with ice cut from the nearby Rivanna River, shallow ponds, or snow . . . — Map (db m68174) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Here on December the tenth MDCCCLXIX the Kappa Sigma Fraternity was founded by William Grisby McCormick • George Miles Arnold • John Covert Boyd • Edmund Law Rogers • Frank Courtney Nicodemus. Manet Mansuraque Est. Map (db m8812) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — G-29 — Monacan Indian Village
Near here, on both sides of the Rivanna River, was located the Monacan Indian village of Monasukapanough. This village was one of five Monacan towns that Captain John Smith recorded by name on his 1612 Map of Virginia, though many more . . . — Map (db m45497) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Mulberry Row — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Every article is made on his farm; his negroes are cabinet makers, carpenters, masons, bricklayers, smith, etc. Duc de La Rochefoucauld Liancourt, 1796 You are standing on Mulberry Row, a road once lined with more than 20 dwellings, . . . — Map (db m68171) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — 02 — Mulberry RowMulberry Row's Evolution
Jefferson attempted to create an efficient plantation based on new approaches to agriculture and manufacturing. To realize his goals, dozens of enslaved and free workers lived and worked here on Mulberry Row. Jefferson added a series of dwellings . . . — Map (db m100132) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Nail-Making
Jefferson set up a nail-making operation in 1794 to provide income until he could “put my farms into a course of yielding profit.” He calculated the nailers’ daily output, the waste of nailrod, and profits. In its first years, the . . . — Map (db m80862) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — North Terrace Wing
What you see here is a reconstruction of the North Terrace wing. The original wing, built 1801-05, housed Jefferson's carriages and the horses and carriages of visitors; most of Jefferson's horses were stabled at the east end of Mulberry Row. Horses . . . — Map (db m100469) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Nursery
This was the general site of the "old nursery," where Jefferson grafted and sowed the seed of special garden plants. He propagated thirteen kinds of shrubs, forty—one species of ornamental trees, twenty—six vegetable varieties, six kinds . . . — Map (db m100003) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Piney River Cabin
Virginia's virgin forest provided materials for the settlers' most basic shelter. Centuries ago, first growth trees were felled and the wood hewn to form this single-room log cabin in Piney River, Virginia, 45 minutes south of here. The structure is . . . — Map (db m53613) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-163 — Revolutionary Soldiers Graves
Jesse Pitman Lewis (d. March 8, 1849), of the Virginia Militia, and Taliaferro Lewis (d. July 12, 1810), of the Continental Line, two of several brothers who fought in the War for Independence, are buried in the Lewis family cemetery 100 yards south . . . — Map (db m3994) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Rio HillArtifacts Found at Rio Hill
Civil War relic collectors found Stuart’s winter camp and skirmish site (shaded area of map) long before the Rio Hill Shopping Center opened in 1989. Metal detectors were used to search the area and artifacts—bullets, buttons, belt and . . . — Map (db m7692) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Rio Hill 1864 SkirmishGeorge A. Custer Attacks a Confederate Winter Camp
In December 1863, Confederate troops established winter quarters here. The approximately 200 soldiers, under the command of Capt. Marcellus N. Moorman, were from Stuart’s Horse Artillery Battalion and were equipped with 16 cannons. The men built . . . — Map (db m7690) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — G-26 — Rio Mills
The 19th-century mill village of Rio Mills stood 600 yards west of here, where the former Harrisonburg-Charlottesville Turnpike crossed the South Fork of the Rivanna River. Following the Battle of Rio Hill on 29 February 1864, Union General George . . . — Map (db m19836) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Site of Viewmont
Built before 1744 by Col. Joshua Fry 1699-1754 Surveyor, Mathematician, Pioneer Commander-in-Chief of Virginia Forces French and Indian War George Washington Inscribed over his Grave “Here lies the good, the just and the noble . . . — Map (db m23244) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-197 — Skirmish at Rio Hill
On February 29, 1864, General George A. Custer and 1500 cavalrymen made a diversionary raid Into Albemarle County. Here, north of Charlottesville, he attacked the Confederate winter camp of four batteries of the Stuart Horse Artillery commanded by . . . — Map (db m7685) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — 05 — Slave Housing
Over 200 years ago, four log dwellings stood here. The first, constructed in the 1770s and destroyed by fire ca. 1790. was the "Negro quarter," a large 17 x 34 foot structure intended for multiple enslaved individuals or families. Three identical, . . . — Map (db m100176) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — 08 — Smokehouse/Dairy
In the long, three-celled wooden structure that stood here between ca. 1790 and 1809, Jefferson combined two of what he considered "indispensable" elements of a Virginia plantation, the "smoke house" and "dairy." His unusual design placed "two . . . — Map (db m100440) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — GA-46 — Southern Albemarle Rural Historic District
Bounded by the James River to the south and the Rivanna River to the north, this nationally significant district encompasses 83,627 acres. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007, it includes buildings influenced by Jefferson’s . . . — Map (db m23240) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Textiles — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Panel 1 Jefferson introduced mechanized cloth production to his plantation when trade embargoes and looming war cut off the supply of imported British cloth. In 1811, he hired William McLure, a free white artisan and "a very ingenious man," . . . — Map (db m68175) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial“The Hill that Heals”
Dedicated to the lasting memory of all who served our country in Vietnam and Southeast Asia. Champ Jackson Lawson, Jr. — 04 November 1965 Grandville Reynard Jones, Jr. — 05 December 1965 Oscar Mauterer — 15 February . . . — Map (db m102781) HM WM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Levy Legacy — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
After Jefferson's death in 1826, his heirs sold his property, including his slaves, to pay his debts. Naval officer Uriah Phillips Levy, who admired Jefferson for his support of religious liberty, purchased Monticello in 1834 to preserve it. This is . . . — Map (db m80808) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Meadow Run Grist Mill
Not far from the Tavern, the Michie family owned and operated a mill and general store. At the turn of the century the mill fell from decay. In order to recreate the Michie's Tavern-plantation (which stretched for several miles) Historic Michie . . . — Map (db m53611) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Monticello Graveyard
This graveyard had its beginning in an agreement between two young men, Thomas Jefferson and Dabney Carr, who were school-mates and friends. They agreed that they would be buried under a great oak which stood here. Carr, who married Jefferson's . . . — Map (db m80807) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — These Willow Oaks
These willow oaks were planted by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip in ceremonies honoring the royal visit to the Western Virginia Bicentennial Center July 10, 1976. — Map (db m21950) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Thomas Jefferson
Here was born Thomas Jefferson April 13, 1743 Lover of Liberty Map (db m68666) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Thomas JeffersonCitizen-Statesman-Patriot
The greatest advocate of human liberty Opposing special privileges He loved and trusted The People To commemorate his Purchase of Louisiana Erected by The Jefferson Club of St. Louis MO on their pilgrimage Oct 12, 1901 to . . . — Map (db m99849) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Tobacco Barn ca.1790
This barn was once a place to hang and dry harvested tobacco plants. Tobacco was the primary cash crop in early Virginia. Many large landholders, including the Michies, grew tobacco as their principal money-making crop. However, in time, these . . . — Map (db m53612) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Q-22 — Union Occupation of Charlottesville
On 3 Mar. 1865, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s Union Army of the Shenandoah entered Charlottesville to destroy railroad facilities as the 3rd Cavalry Division led by Bvt. Maj. Gen. George A. Custer arrived from Waynesboro. Mayor Christopher H. . . . — Map (db m95140) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Vanguard of FreedomUnited States Army — Bicentennial 1775–1975
Citizens of central and western Virginia have contributed significantly to national defense and to the U.S. Army throughout its 200-year history. During the Revolutionary War, Virginians fought valiantly as members of the militia and the . . . — Map (db m21890) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Viewmont
Birthplace of Lottie Moon Baptist Missionary to China 1873-1912 — Map (db m23041) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — William Holding Echols — 1859–1934
William Holding Echols (1859–1934), Professor of Mathematics, lived in this pavilion. By precept and example, he taught many generations of students with ruthless insistence that the supreme values are self respect, integrity of mind, contempt . . . — Map (db m62645) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Wood Trades
This chimney and foundation are all that remain of the “joiner’s shop”, one of the first structures on Mulberry Row. From about 1775, free and enslaved workmen produced some of the finest woodwork in Virginia. Sawyers and carpenters . . . — Map (db m80860) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Cobham — GA-48 — St. John School — Rosenwald Funded
The St. John School, built here in 1922–1923, served African-American students during the segregation era. Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears Roebuck and Co., collaborated with Booker T. Washington in a school-building campaign begining in . . . — Map (db m102560) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Covesville — GA-44 — Covesville Apple Industry
In 1866 Dr. William D. Boaz established the first commercial apple orchard in Covesville. These orchards specialized in the Albemarle Pippin, which became one of the most prized and profitable apple varieties grown in Virginia. By 1890 the success . . . — Map (db m25473) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Covesville — Z-21 — Nelson County / Albemarle County
Nelson County. In the foothills of Virginia’s Piedmont, Nelson County was formed in 1807 from Amherst County. The county was named for Thomas Nelson, Jr., governor of Virginia from June to November 1781. The county seat is Lovingston. The . . . — Map (db m44042) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Crozet — W-170 — Crozet
The town grew around a rail stop established on Wayland’s farm in 1878. It was named for Col. B. Claudius Crozet, (1789–1864)—Napoleonic Army officer, and Virginia’s Engineer and Cartographer—he built this pioneer railway through . . . — Map (db m1798) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Earlysville — GA-41 — Earlysville Union Church
Earlysville Union Church is a rare surviving early-19th-century interdenominational church constructed in Albemarle County. Built in 1833, this frame structure served as a meetinghouse for all Christian denominations on land deeded by John . . . — Map (db m21650) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Earlysville — First Buck Mountain Church
This tablet placed here by the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia in the year 1930, commemorates the founding of the First Buck Mountain Church established under the authority of The Church of England and builded one mile west of . . . — Map (db m21690) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Esmont — Ballenger Church
Shortly after the formation of St. Anne's Parish in 1745, this established church stood on a knoll 100 yards north on nearby Ballenger Creek. Not used regularly after the old parish was dissolved in 1785, the building was in ruins by 1820 and was . . . — Map (db m29953) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Esmont — The Glebe
In 1762 the vestry of St. Anne's Parish purchased from William Burton 400 acres here for the residence and lands of the rector of the parish, established in 1745. This glebe was so used almost until the dissolution of the old parish. It was sold in . . . — Map (db m29951) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Gordonsville — Z-151 — Albemarle County/Louisa County
ALBEMARLE COUNTY Albemarle County was formed in 1744 from Goochland County and named for William Anne Keppel, the second Earl of Albemarle, titular governor of Virginia from 1737 to 1754. A portion of Louisa County was later added to Albemarle . . . — Map (db m22780) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Gordonsville — G-25 — General Thomas Sumter
Thomas Sumter was born on 14 Aug. 1734 in this region. Sumter, a member of the Virginia militia during the French and Indian War, moved to South Carolina in 1765. He served as a lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army (1776–1778); in June . . . — Map (db m17501) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Greenwood — W-164 — Mirador
Nearby stands Mirador the childhood home of Nancy, Viscountess Astor, the first woman member of Parliament. Born Nancy Witcher Langhorne in 1879, she lived here from 1892 to 1897. In 1906 she married Waldorf Astor and moved to England permanently. . . . — Map (db m1535) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Greenwood — Mirador
This was the girlhood home of Viscountess Nancy Astor, first woman member of the British Parliament. She was a daughter of Chiswell Dabney Langhorne, who bought “Mirador” in 1892. The house was built sometime after 1832 for James M. . . . — Map (db m1536) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Greenwood — VDOT Workers’ Memorial
The monument before you honors Virginia state highway workers who lost their lives while serving the Commonwealth’s travelers. No public funds were used to build this memorial. It was built entirely with donations from Virginia Department of . . . — Map (db m26332) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Grottoes — Shenandoah’s Deer
“Look! There’s a deer!” Visitors often exclaim these words in Shenandoah national park-an amazing fact since deer were not here in 1926 when Congress authorized Shenandoah. Years of hunting and other human activity had eliminated them. . . . — Map (db m46006) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Grottoes — Skyline DriveThe High Road Through Shenandoah National Park
Among the scenic roads of America’s national parks, the Skyline Drive may be the most famous. For decades the Drive has given millions of visitors easy access to the mountains and sky of Shenandoah National Park. The Skyline Drive follows the . . . — Map (db m46008) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Ivy — W-161 — Birthplace of Meriwether Lewis
Half a mile north was born, 1774, Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, sent by Jefferson to explore the far west, 1804–1806. The expedition reached the mouth of the Columbia River, November 15, 1805. — Map (db m1795) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Ivy — W-162 — Jackson’s Valley Campaign
Late in April 1862, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson marched his army out of the Shenandoah Valley through the Blue Ridge Mountains to deceive Union Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont into thinking he was headed for Richmond. On 3 May, . . . — Map (db m1797) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — W-204 — Castle Hill
The original house was built in 1765 by Thomas Walker, explorer and pioneer. Tarleton, raiding Charlottesville to capture Jefferson and the legislature, stopped here for breakfast, June 4, 1781. This delay aided the patriots to escape. Castle Hill . . . — Map (db m22439) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — W-205 — Revolutionary War Campaign of 1781Mechunk Creek
After reinforcements from Brig. Gen "Mad" Anthony Wayne arrived on 10 June 1781, the Marquis de Lafayette moved south from his camp on the Rapidan River to prevent further raids by Gen. Charles Cornwallis British troops encamped at Elk Hill. By 13 . . . — Map (db m22617) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — GA-43 — Southwest Mountains Rural Historic District
Extending from the Orange County line on the north to the outskirts of Charlottesville with the Southwest Mountains forming its spine, this historic district encompasses more than 31,000 acres and contains some of the Piedmont’s most pristine and . . . — Map (db m17447) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Lindsay — JE-6 — Maury’s School
Just north was a classical school conducted by the Rev. James Maury, rector of Fredericksville Parish from 1754 to 1769. Thomas Jefferson was one of Maury’s students. Matthew Fontaine Maury, the “Pathfinder of the Seas,” was Maury’s . . . — Map (db m17459) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Midway — W-225 — Miller School
W 225 A bequest of Samuel Miller (1792–1869) provided funds to found the Miller School in 1878. Miller, a Lynchburg businessman born in poverty in Albemarle County, envisioned a regional school for children who could not afford an education. . . . — Map (db m21699) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Proffit — G-22 — Proffit Historic District
Ben Brown and other newly freed slaves, who founded the community after the Civil War, first named the settlement Egypt and then Bethel. About 1881, the community became known as Proffit when the Virginia Midland Railway placed a stop here, . . . — Map (db m16946) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-35 — Barclay House and Scottsville Museum
Here stands the Barclay House, built about 1830, later the home of Dr. James Turner Barclay, inventor for the U. S. Mint and missionary to Jerusalem. He founded the adjacent Diciples Church in 1846 and served as its first preacher. It is now the . . . — Map (db m17995) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Ferries In Virginia/TheHatton Ferry/Heritage
Ferries In Virginia The James, York, Rappahannock and smaller rivers were the primary means of commercial transportation in Virginia until the advent of railroads in the mid-1800’s. In most locations ferries provided the only way to cross . . . — Map (db m14527) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA 37 — Hatton Ferry
James A. Brown began operating a store and ferry at this site on rented property in the late 1870’s. In 1881 he bought the land from S. P. Gantt at which time the store became a stop on the Richmond and Alleghany Railroad. Two years later, Brown was . . . — Map (db m12882) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-38 — Hatton Ferry
Five miles southwest of here is the Hatton Ferry on the James River which began operating in the 1870s. James A. Brown established the ferry and a store on land first rented and then purchased from S.P. Gantt in 1881. In 1883 when a post office was . . . — Map (db m88501) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Hatton Ferry
History of Hatton Ferry. The Hatton Ferry began operation in 1870, when Buckingham County authorities issued a court order to construct a public ferry across the James River to the Albemarle County lands of Thomas P. Gantt (ca. 1846-1896), a . . . — Map (db m99392) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-36 — Historic Scottsville
In 1745 old Albemarle County was organized at Scott’s landing, its first county seat, here on the great horseshoe bend of the James River. In 1818 the town was incorporated as Scottsville, beginning in 1840 it flourished as the chief port above . . . — Map (db m17894) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Hurricane Camille
On August 20, 1969, flood waters of the James River rose to this point as an aftermath of Hurricane Camille causing great loss to the people of Scottsville. This plaque was erected to remind all who read it of the vulnerability of mortal man to . . . — Map (db m17948) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — ScottsvilleWhen War Came
At 3 p.m. on Monday, March 6, 1865, the first of Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s 10,000 cavalrymen under Gens. Wesley Merritt, Thomas Devin, and George A. Custer entered Scottsville unopposed. To accomplish their mission—destroy the James . . . — Map (db m17844) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Scottsville Confederate Cemetery
In memory of the soldiers who died in the Confederate General Hospital in Scottsville 1862-1863 Beattie, F.M. Co. H 23 NC Boyle, Andrew Co. D 41 VA Brashear, Denis P. Co. E 4 AL Clark, Henry Co. E 15 AL Clark, Hosey L. Co. F 2 MS . . . — Map (db m22784) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-45 — Wilson Cary Nicholas1761-1820
Just to the south was Mount Warren, the home of Wilson Cary Nicholas. He served in the Continental army, represented Albemarle County in the General Assembly (1784–1789, 1794–1799), and was a delegate to the Virginia Convention of 1788 . . . — Map (db m19406) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Shadwell — W-203 — Edgehill
The land was patented in 1735. The old house was built in 1790; the new in 1828. Here lived Thomas Mann Randolph, governor of Virginia 1819–1922, who married Martha, daughter of Thomas Jefferson. — Map (db m17335) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Shadwell — W-202 — Shadwell, Birthplace of Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson—author of the Declaration of Independence, third president of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia—was born near this site on 13 April 1743. His father, Peter Jefferson (1708–1757), a . . . — Map (db m17306) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Simeon — FL-8 — Ash Lawn – Highland
This estate was the home of James Monroe, fifth president of the United States. In 1793, James and Elizabeth Kortright Monroe purchased 1,000 acres adjoining Jefferson’s Monticello. Called Highland, the plantation, eventually totaling 3,500 acres, . . . — Map (db m23437) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Simeon — W-201 — Colle
The house was built about 1770 by workmen engaged in building Monticello. Mazzei, an Italian, lived here for some years adapting grape culture to Virginia. Baron de Riedesel, captured at Saratoga in 1777, lived here with his family, 1779–1780. . . . — Map (db m21952) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — "For God and Country"
In Loving Memory of Kate Waller Barrett, 1859-1925 First President American Legion Auxiliary Department of Virginia 1922 National President American Legion Auxiliary 1923 ▼▲▼▲▼ This Tablet . . . — Map (db m72401) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — "Pursuers of Booth the Assassin"Alexandria National Cemetery
. . . — Map (db m73446) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — 115 Prince StreetCaptain's Row
George Washington's 1749 Survey shows this lot fronting the Potomac River. The original house on this site was built in 1783. It was destroyed in the great fire of January 18, 1827, which consumed 53 houses and numerous outbuildings in Old Town. . . . — Map (db m71794) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — 1323 Duke Street – From Slavery to Freedom and Service — Alexandria Heritage Trail
Text, upper half of marker panel: This house, built by Emmanuel Jones by 1888, stands at the corner of a block that witnessed the extremes of 19th century African American experience. From a slave trading company to significant . . . — Map (db m46124) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — A National Cemetery System
Civil War Dead An estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in the Civil War between April 1861 and April 1865. As the death toll rose, the U.S. government struggled with the urgent but unplanned need to bury fallen Union troops. . . . — Map (db m92115) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — A Tale of Three Jurisdictions
Did you know that you traverse the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia when you cross this bridge? The brass lines in the walkway mark the boundaries. They also commemorate the cooperation required to build this bridge. Follow the . . . — Map (db m60241) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — AlexandriaAlexandria in the Civil War
“Alexandria is ours,” declared Col. Orlando Wilcox of the 1st Michigan Vol. Inf. as his regiment captured the city on the morning of May 24, 1861. When Virginia's vote of secession became effective, Union forces immediately crossed the . . . — Map (db m159) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E-89 — Alexandria Academy
On 17 Dec. 1785, George Washington endowed a school here in the recently established Alexandria Academy “for the purpose of educating orphan children.” In 1812, an association of free African Americans founded its own school here in . . . — Map (db m813) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria Canal (1843 - 1886)Lock #3
Buried beneath this canal stone lies Lock #3 of the Alexandria Canal, which connected the Harbor of Alexandria with the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal in Georgetown, D.C. between 1843 and 1886. After Crossing the Potomac on an aqueduct bridge near the . . . — Map (db m80668) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E 88 — Alexandria Library Sit-In
On 21 August 1939, five young African American men applied for library cards at the new Alexandria Library to protest its whites-only policy. After being denied, William Evans, Edward Gaddis, Morris Murray, Clarence Strange, and Otto L. Tucker each . . . — Map (db m82774) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria National Cemetery
Securing the Capital On May 24, 1861, Gen. Winfield Scott ordered eleven regiments of Union troops from Washington, D.C., across the Potomac River, where they captured Arlington and Alexandria. After their defeat in July at Manassas, . . . — Map (db m92113) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria Railroads
Three railroads developed in Alexandria during the mid-19th century, a period of limited industrial expansion for the City. Alexandrians had a invested heavily in the Alexandria Canal which opened in 1843, giving the city access to the rich . . . — Map (db m72379) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria Washington LodgeNo. 22 AF & AM
Chartered A.D. 1788 Destroyed by Fire May 19, A.D. 1871 Rebuilt A.D. 1874 Adolf Cluss - Architect This plaque mounted in cooperation with the City of Alexandria by the Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22 Ancient Free and . . . — Map (db m69947) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Alexandria, VirginiaMarket Square — Alexandria Historic District
Wording on stone tablet to left: Alexandria, Virginia County seat of Fairfax 1742-1800 Organized 13th July, 1749 Incorporated by the Assembly of Virginia 1779 Ceded to the Federal Government 1789 First boundary . . . — Map (db m69923) HM WM
Virginia, Alexandria — E 124 — Alfred Street Baptist Church
Alfred Street Baptist Church is home to the oldest African American congregation in Alexandria, dating to the early 19th century. It has served as a prominent religious, educational, and cultural institution. In 1818, the congregation, then . . . — Map (db m14623) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Bank of Alexandria
Established in 1792, this was the first financial institution authorized by the General Assembly of Virginia. The building was completed in 1807. It is one of the oldest surviving commercial structures in Alexandria and is a fine local example of . . . — Map (db m81250) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Battery Rodgers
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Battery Rodgers Here stood Battery Rodgers, built in 1863 to prevent enemy ships from passing up the Potomac River. The battery had a perimeter of 30 yards and mounted five 200 pounder Parrott . . . — Map (db m41413) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E 139 — Beulah Baptist Church
African Americans escaping slavery found refuge in Alexandria after Union troops occupied the city in 1861. The Rev. Clement “Clem” Robinson established the First Select Colored School in 1862. Hundreds of students registered for day and . . . — Map (db m98079) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Bombproof
Two bombproofs, each measuring 200 feet long by 12.5 feet wide, were located in the center of Fort Ward. During normal operations the bombproofs were used as meeting rooms, storage facilities, and sometimes as a prison. In the event of an attack, . . . — Map (db m7716) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Braddock Cannon
(North Side): This monument marks the trail taken by the army of General Braddock which left Alexandria on April 20, 1755 to defend the western frontier against the French and Indians. Erected by the Society of Colonial Dames of America . . . — Map (db m7567) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Brigadier General Montgomery D. Corse, CSA
Brigadier General Montgomery D. Corse, CSA Born here in 1816, died Alexandria 1895. Volunteer, Mexican War 1846-1848. Prospector in California, Commander, 17th Virginia Infantry Regiment, CSA. Post-war civic leader and banker. Buried . . . — Map (db m65489) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Bush Hill
Josiah Watson, a wealthy merchant and postmaster of Alexandria, established his 272-acre plantation, “Bush Hill”, in 1791. Richard Marshall Scott purchased the plantation in 1791; his family stayed here for 200 years. Scott was an . . . — Map (db m2610) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Capt. James McGuire House
Built 1816-18 by Capt. James McGuire Occupied for much of his Alexandria ministry by Rev. Samuel Cornelius, Pastor First Baptist Church, 1824-41 Restored 1964-65 by Mr. & Mrs. John Page Elliott Alexandria Historical Restoration . . . — Map (db m66551) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Colross-Alexandria's Urban PhoenixAlexandria Heritage Trail
For over a century, this two-acre block was occupied by a mansion known as Colross. Built in 1800 by John Potts, the mansion, with its outbuildings, gardens, orchard, and a "clover lot" was in effect a small plantation. Colross's owners . . . — Map (db m72384) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Contrabands and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial
The Contrabands and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial is dedicated to honoring more than 1,700 people of African descent buried here during and following the Civil War, as well as those who may have been laid to rest after the cemetery officially . . . — Map (db m77244) HM WM
Virginia, Alexandria — Contrabands and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial
Seeking freedom and a chance to begin a new life thousands of African Americans fleeing slavery flooded Civil War-era Alexandria. The city was quickly overwhelmed, and as living conditions grew dire, many perished from disease and deprivation. In . . . — Map (db m86652) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — D.C.'s First Building BlockJones Point Park
In 1791, surveyors on Jones Point began to lay out the ten-mile square that would become Washington, D.C. The first marker for the survey—the south cornerstone—was set in place on this spot. Although the stone within this protective . . . — Map (db m60162) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Engin Artemel
As Planning Director (1977-1984) Engin Artemel led the City of Alexandria in planning for the transformation of its industrial waterfront to one that can be enjoyed by visitors and residents alike. Inspired by beautiful active urban waterfronts in . . . — Map (db m99596) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Entrance Gate to Fort WardOfficers' Hut
The Fort Ward entrance gate, completed in May 1865, provided the only access to the interior of the fort. The gate's decorative details include stands of cannonballs and the insignia (castle) of the Army Corps of Engineers which designed and . . . — Map (db m7680) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — T-45 — Episcopal High School
Episcopal High School, on the hill to the southwest, was founded in 1839 as a boys' preparatory school, one of the first in the South; girls were admitted in 1991. The school was a pioneer in the establishment of student honor codes in preparatory . . . — Map (db m7559) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fighting BackStar-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail — War of 1812
With Alexandria under British control in August 1814, top-ranking U.S. military men gathered at this high point above the city. President Madison conferred with Secretary of the Navy William Jones, Brigadier General John Hungerford, and U.S. Navy . . . — Map (db m81243) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — First Catholic Church in VirginiaA. D. 1795
This stone taken from the canal of the Potomac Company of which Washington and Fitzgerald were Directors commemorates the erection of the First Catholic Church in Virginia, A. D. 1795, which stood until 1839 about twenty feet behind this . . . — Map (db m79678) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — First Original Federal Boundary StoneDistrict of Columbia
Placed April 15, 1791. Protected by Mount Vernon Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, April 30, 1926. — Map (db m60178) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — First Presbyterian Church of Alexandria"Old Presbyterian Meeting House"
Panel 1 - upper middle of east face: The First Presbyterian Church of Alexandria founded A.D. 1772 House of worship erected 1774. Destroyed by lightning July 20, 1835. Rebuilt on the same lot A.D. 1836. Panel 2 - . . . — Map (db m77843) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Former USCT Burial GroundRather Die Freemen Than Live To Be Slaves
This corner of the cemetery was probably reserved for members of the U.S. Colored Troops, some of whom were veterans of battles like the siege of Petersburg and the Battle of the Crater. In 1864, a group of USCT convalescing at L'Ouveruture Hospital . . . — Map (db m87058) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fort Ellsworth
Fort Ellsworth, one of 68 earthen forts built to protect Washington during the Civil War, was constructed in 1861. When completed, the fort had a perimeter of 618 yards and was an irregular Vauban-type star design of French origin. The fort was . . . — Map (db m45046) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fort Ward1861-1865
On May 24, 1861, when Virginia's secession from the Union became effective, Federal forces immediately occupied Northern Virginia to protect the City of Washington, D.C. After the Confederate victory at the Battle of First Bull Run (First Manassas) . . . — Map (db m7676) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fort Ward1861-1865
This stairway leads up the west wall of Fort Ward between the Northwest Bastion (to the left) and the Southwest Bastion (to the right). Fort Ward had 14 cannon emplacements along this area of the wall that created overlapping fields of fire. . . . — Map (db m7709) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fort Ward
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Ward Here stands Fort Ward, constructed in 1861 to protect the approaches to Alexandria by Little River Turnpike and Leesburg Turnpike. In 1864, the fort was enlarged to a perimeter of 818 . . . — Map (db m41117) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fort Williams
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 100 yards to the west stood Fort Williams, built in 1863 to guard the approaches to Alexandria by Little River Turnpike and Telegraph Road. It had a perimeter of 250 yards and emplacements . . . — Map (db m80467) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Fort Worth
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 Here stood Fort Worth, built in 1861. It had a commanding view of the Cameron Valley and guarded the approach to Alexandria by Little River Turnpike. The fort had a perimeter of 463 yards . . . — Map (db m80466) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E-131 — Franklin and Armfield Slave Office(1315 Duke Street)
Isaac Franklin and John Armfield leased this brick building with access to the wharves and docks in 1828 as a holding pen for enslaved people being shipped from Northern Virginia to Louisiana. They purchased the building and three lots in 1832. From . . . — Map (db m72628) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E-109 — Freedmen’s Cemetery
Federal authorities established a cemetery here for newly freed African Americans during the Civil War. In January 1864, the military governor of Alexandria confiscated for use as a burying ground an abandoned pasture from a family with Confederate . . . — Map (db m68192) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Friendship Fire Company
Organized 1774 Original building erected July 23, 1855 New addition erected October 30, 1972 Housing relics for future generations. Gift of Bernard B. Brown — Map (db m65818) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Gadsby’s Tavern
Erected 1792. Popular resort and famous hostelry of the Eighteenth Century. Here was held in 1798 the first celebration of Washington's Birthday in which he participated, and from its steps Washington held his last military review and gave his last . . . — Map (db m146) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Gazette House
This building dates to 1801. Between 1852-1911 the Alexandria Gazette newspaper was printed here. In 1862 while Alexandria was occupied by the North during the Civil War, Union soldiers burned this building because it was reported here that St. Paul . . . — Map (db m41832) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — George Washington High School
Dedicated to the memory of those of our boys who served in World War II and did not come back Erected by the graduating classes of 1943**1944**1945**1946**1947 (west side) Robert Rumshin • Herbert Joseph Petrello • Benjamin J. . . . — Map (db m80571) WM
Virginia, Alexandria — Green & Brother Furniture
Steam Furniture Works. Established 1828. Green & Brother, manufacturers of chamber, hall, parlor, dining-room, school, and church furniture. Wholesale and retail. Ssend for price list. Handrail, newells, balusters, brackets, bed-posts, table-legs; . . . — Map (db m71742) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Guarding the PotomacBattery Rodgers 1863-1865
The area around Jones Point, which lies just south of the nation’s capital, was an obvious location for early defensive fortifications. During the Civil War (1861-1865), Battery Rodgers was built overlooking the cove to guard the river approach . . . — Map (db m69911) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E 86 — Historic Alexandria
Alexandria was named for the family of John Alexander, a Virginia planter who in 1669 acquired the tract on which the town began. By 1732, the site was known as Hunting Creek Warehouse and in 1749 became Alexandria, thereafter a major 18th-century . . . — Map (db m47) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Historic Street
In the 1790's many Alexandria streets were paved with cobblestones. According to legend, Hessian soldiers provided the labor to cobble Princess Street. These cobbles remained essentially untouched until 1979, when the street was restored using the . . . — Map (db m71813) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Home of Dr. James Craik(Born 1730 - Died Feb. 6, 1814)
Close personal friend and family physician of Washington. Surgeon in Braddock's campaign, also with Washington throughout the Revolutionary War. Was at his bedside when he died and received his last messages. — Map (db m72341) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Home of Edmund Jennings LeeCompleted 1801
Eminent lawyer, he lived here until 1837. His son, Cassius Francis Lee until 1865. Edmund Jennings Lee served as Vestryman and Warden of Christ Church, whose Glebe lands he successfully defended from confiscation after the Revolutionary War. Major . . . — Map (db m8566) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Home of Elisha Cullen Dick(Born 1750 - Died 1825)
Was consulting physician in Washington's last illness. At the moment of Washington's death he stopped the bedroom clock, which can be seen in Alexandria Washington Lodge, and conducted the Masonic Funeral service at his grave. — Map (db m71751) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Home of Henry Lee(Light Horse Harry)
Famous Revolutionary Soldier, Father of Robert E. Lee. Was ardent supporter of Federalists. Defended Washington in political contests and delivered eulogy before Congress at Washington's Death in which he used the now famous phrase: "First in . . . — Map (db m72316) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Hooff's Run BridgeAlexandria Heritage Trail
The bridge is one of the last remnants of Alexandria's first railroad, the Orange & Alexandria. The “O&ARR,” as it was commonly called, opened in 1851 and had 148 miles of track in 1860. The bridge was constructed by the railroad as it . . . — Map (db m99330) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — James Bland Homes
Funded by the U.S. Public Housing Administration and built by the Alexandria Housing and Redevelopment Authority (ARHA) between 1954 and 1959, the James Bland Homes was Alexandria's fourth public housing project, and it more than doubled the city's . . . — Map (db m72374) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — James Harris House
Built 1816-17 by James Harris Owned 1835-37 by George W. Carlin Occupied late 1830's by William C. Reynolds, twice Secretary Alexandria Lodge of Washington No. 22, A.F. & A.M. Restored 1964-66 by Jean Keith Alexandria Historical . . . — Map (db m66549) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — John Douglass Brown House
Farm house in Fairfax County, Virginia, located upon part of a seven hundred acre land patent granted to Margaret Brent in 1654. Owned and occupied by descendants of John Douglass Brown and Mary Goulding Gretter since 1816. Placed by John . . . — Map (db m71738) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — John Fitzgerald1776-1976
This building was the warehouse of John Fitzgerald, Alexandria merchant and officer of the third Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line.

Colonel Fitzgerald was a close friend of General George Washington and he was his secretary and . . . — Map (db m81247) HM

Virginia, Alexandria — E 117 — Jones Point
American Indians first frequented Jones Point to hunt and fish. The point is likely named for an early English settler. By the 1790's, military installations were established at Jones point due to its strategic location on the Potomac River. The . . . — Map (db m79997) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Lake Cook
Lake Cook is named for Dayton L. Cook, P.E., the City of Alexandria's Director of Transportation and Environmental Services, who was instrumental in the purchase, design, and construction of the Eisenhower Valley public improvements. Mr. Cook helped . . . — Map (db m27160) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E-91 — Lee’s Boyhood Home
Robert E. Lee left this home that he loves so well to enter West Point. After Appomattox he returned and climbed the wall to see “if the snowballs were in bloom.” George Washington dined here when it was the home of William Fitzhugh, . . . — Map (db m8548) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — E-93 — Lee-Fendall House
“Light Horse Harry” Lee, Revolutionary War officer, owned this land in 1784. The house was built in 1785 by Phillip Fendall, a Lee relative. Renovated in 1850 in the Greek Revival style, the house remained in the Lee family until 1903. . . . — Map (db m8567) HM
Virginia, Alexandria — Lee-Fendall House
Built by Philip Richard Fendall in 1785 on land purchased from Henry (Light Horse Harry) Lee. Lee was a brilliant cavalry officer in the Revolution, close friend of George Washington, Virginia Assemblyman, member of Congress and Governor of . . . — Map (db m8596) HM

7565 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 7365
Paid Advertisement