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Central in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Central
 
Central Marker - Front Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
1. Central Marker - Front
 
Inscription.
[Front]:
The town of Central, chartered in 1875, grew up along what is now Gaines Street. The post office was called Five Mile from 1851 to 1871. In the 1870s the Atlanta & Richmond Airline Railway built its depot, hotel, offices, and railroad shops at Central. The railroad, later the Atlanta & Charlotte, was acquired by the Southern Railway in 1894. Also called “Centre” and “Central Station,” the town was halfway between Atlanta and Charlotte, 133 miles each way.

[Reverse]:
Issaqueena Cotton Mill, founded by D.K. Norris in 1903, was later operated by Central Mills, Cannon Mills, and Central Textiles. Wesleyan Methodist Bible Institute was founded in 1906 as an elementary and Bible school. It became a junior college in 1928, Central Wesleyan College in 1959, and Southern Wesleyan University in 1994. S.C. Hwy. 93 was once U.S. Hwy. 123, a main route from Atlanta to Charlotte.
 
Erected 2009 by Central Heritage Society and the Town of Central. (Marker Number 39-14.)
 
Location. 34° 43.433′ N, 82° 46.967′ W. Marker is in Central, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (State Highway 93) and Bank Street
 
Central Marker<br>Front, Looking West Along Main Street Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
2. Central Marker
Front, Looking West Along Main Street
 
, on the right when traveling west on West Main Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Central SC 29630, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bertha Evans Morgan Rose Garden (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Central History Museum (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named The Central History Museum (approx. ¼ mile away); Freedom's Hill Church (approx. 1.1 miles away); John C. Calhoun Memorial Highway (approx. 2.7 miles away); Keowee / John Ewing Colhoun (approx. 2.8 miles away); The Piazza (approx. 3.5 miles away); Ashtabula (approx. 3.6 miles away); Calhoun - Clemson School (approx. 3.8 miles away); Blue Key National Honor Fraternity Gateway (approx. 3.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Central.
 
Also see . . .
1. Central, South Carolina. Central is a town in Pickens County, South Carolina, United States. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Town of Central. Located in the northwest corner of the state, Central is midway between Atlanta, Georgia and Charlotte, North Carolina. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Central Heritage Society. The Central Heritage Society was formed in November 1993. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Central Marker Reverse Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
3. Central Marker Reverse
 

4. Central High School. The Central High School is a good example of a small town, educational building rendered in the Classical Revival style. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Morgan House. The Morgan House, constructed in 1893, is one of Central’s most important architectural and historical landmarks. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Atlanta and Richmond Air-Line Railway. Organized in 1870, the Atlanta and Richmond Air–Line Railway combined the Georgia Air Line Railroad and the Air Line Railroad in South Carolina under president Algernon S. Buford. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Railway. The Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Railway emerged from the 1877 re-organization of the Atlanta and Richmond Air Line Railway. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Southern Railway. The Southern Railway (reporting mark SOU) is a former United States railroad. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Southern Wesleyan University. Offical website of Southern Wesleyan University. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. Southern Wesleyan University. Southern Wesleyan University is a four-year and graduate Christian college, with its main campus in the town of Central, South Carolina. (Submitted on April 17, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Central Marker<br>Reverse, Looking East Along Main Street Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
4. Central Marker
Reverse, Looking East Along Main Street
 

11. South Carolina Highway 93. South Carolina Highway 93 (abbreviated S.C. Highway 93 or SC 93) is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of South Carolina. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

12. U.S. Route 123. U.S. Route 123 is a spur of U.S. Route 23. (Submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Central - Rich in History
Railroad buffs will have a field day (or several days) exploring Central. As the midpoint between the major population centers of Atlanta and Charlotte, 133 miles from each, this little town found itself the focus of a railroad boom in 1873. The Atlanta and Richmond Air Line Company set up shop and even gave the town its name. The flood of newcomers brought prosperity, and Main Street exploded. New shops, hotels and other businesses cropped up to meet the social and commercial needs of the burgeoning community. Much of the town's character today is directly tied to the railroad. It's obvious that the railroad tracks run through the middle of town (or should we say the trains run through; local residents could set their watches by the passenger and freight trains that still rumble through daily.) Beyond that, much of the town;s architecture is representative of the Victory era. Although the downtown area is thriving, care has been taken to preserve the original storefronts. (Source: Welcome to Central, South Carolina brochure.
 
Downtown Central Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
5. Downtown Central
 
    — Submitted June 15, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Central High School - National Register Nomination Form (1994)
The Central High School is located on a three-fourths acre site at 304 Church Street in the Town of Central, Pickens County, South Carolina. The original portion of the building built in 1908 was a rectangular masonry block two stories in height designed in a classical revival motif with a monumental portico dominating the facade. An addition constructed of matching materials was added to the rear of the building ca. 1925. This addition increased the number of classrooms from six to ten. The entire building is brick and rests on a brick foundation. The roof is a complex hip form sheathed in standing seam metal and surmounted by a cupola with lunnete vents. The main facade faces east and measures approximately sixty-six feet; the original depth of the building was about sixty nine feet. The addition measures approximately one-hundred-and-eight feet by thirty-five feet.

Additional Descriptive Information
The facade of the school building faces east and presents a three-bay facade (A-B-A). Window fenestration is three single, double-hung, six-over-one, wood sash windows symmetrically spaced at the first and second story on the wings.
 
Central High School (1908)<br>410 North Church Street image, Click for more information
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
6. Central High School (1908)
410 North Church Street
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places
May 20, 1994

This Classical Revival columned structure has served the community as a school, a library, and a community theater and has played other civic roles. (Source: Welcome to Central, South Carolina brochure.)
Click for more information.
 
The second story windows have transoms with multiple lights. Flanking wings bracket the monumental portico, which features four massive masonry columns with Scamozzi capitals supporting the entablature and pediment. The tympanum and frieze have been covered in synthetic siding.

The entry is recessed behind a brick arch and features double entry doors, sidelights and transom which match the window transoms. Small square decorative windows with mullions dividing the lights into triangles are placed over the central doorway.

The brick is laid in running bond with a recessed header row every fifth course, which gives the building a strong horizontal appearance contrasting with the decided vertical thrust of the portico. A wood cornice projects from the facade's surface beneath the parapet. The bond pattern and cornice wrap the north and south elevations of the original block. The 1920s addition repeats aspects of the decorative elements to reflect the earlier design. For example, the bond pattern and corbeling at the corners recall the original design, but use large expanses of flat surfaces to reduce expense and construction time. The later addition takes advantage of the sloping site to incorporate a full basement below the water table.

Six classrooms, an auditorium, basement, indoor restrooms, and stairwells were contained in the original section. A
 
Mount Zion United Methodist Church<br>306 Church Street Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
7. Mount Zion United Methodist Church
306 Church Street
 
two-story addition (ca. 1925) was built at the rear of the main building adding four classrooms, two stairwells and a full basement. Two of the classrooms at the front of the 1908 portion of the building remain intact. Library space was created out of the two rear classrooms in 1969 by removing an interior wall. Wood infill was used in the windows to create shelf space.

Two community theaters were installed in 1977 which required altering the second floor classrooms to accommodate this use. Additional windows were also closed with wood infill.

Significance
The Central High School, located at 304 Church Street in Central, South Carolina, is comprised of a 1908 building and a ca. 1925 rear addition. It is a good example of a small town, educational building rendered in the Classic Revival style quite popular during that period. It is also the work of a prominent architect, Christopher Gadsden Sayre, who designed many school buildings in South and North Carolina. This school is also significant for its role in the educational development of Pickens County. An important landmark in Central, the school is located near the town's center and is one of the larger edifices in the community.

Like many other South Carolina counties, Pickens County did not have a public school program until the latter part of the nineteenth century. Although a Joint stock
 
Central Volunteer Fire Department<br>and City Hall Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
8. Central Volunteer Fire Department
and City Hall
 
Company was organized in 1886 to establish schools, no records document a schoolhouse being established until 1893. On 18 February of that same year, the Pickens County Board of Examiners met to consider petitions requesting that school districts be established in the county. The request was approved and the county partitioned into districts containing nine square miles. The Town of Central was in District 9.

Central established a high school in 1893 that was the pride of the community. students paid fees ranging from $1.00 to $2.25 per month, depending on the class in which they were enrolled. They were also charged $.25 per session to defray costs for heat and incidentals. This school served the town until the Pickens County Board of Education ordered an election, held on 7 October 1907, to determine if a State High School should be established in District 9. The proposal carried; Central became eligible for state funds and work on the present building began shortly afterwards.

Pickens County was very much in line with what was happening in other parts of the state regarding school consolidation and construction. On 12 February 1901, the South Carolina Senate passed a child labor bill prohibiting the mill employment of children under twelve years old and encouraging their education. Although it did not become law until several years later, it no doubt heightened
 
Central Railroad Museum<br>108 Werner Street image, Click for more information
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
9. Central Railroad Museum
108 Werner Street
Hours: 9:00 A.M. to Noon, Second Saturday of each month
Click for more information.
 
awareness of the need, especially in textile centers, for a compulsory school attendance law. Since the textile industry was the primary employer in the town of Central it was inevitable that new schools would soon follow. When the General Assembly passed the school Consolidation Act in 1905 the economic incentive local districts needed to embark on a building campaign came into being.

This new law provided "that County Boards of Education, in giving aid, 'shall give preference to districts which have combined and consolidated two or more school buildings.'" In 1905, the State Superintendent of Education wrote in his annual report that consolidation was advantageous to school districts both in terms of better educational opportunities and in making more effective use of funds. The Consolidation Act provided incentive for districts to reduce the number of small schools within the district by offering state funds to match local appropriations for building schools. There were certain conditions the funding came with, however. Pertinent to the design of schools, as noted in the report, was that "all new school buildings which secure aid should be built according to an improved architectural design." This proved to be an excellent opportunity for the professional design community as this provided incentive to employ professionally trained designers.

The architect of
 
Central Caboose -<br>Located East of the Marker<br>Intersection of West Main and Church Streets Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
10. Central Caboose -
Located East of the Marker
Intersection of West Main and Church Streets
 
the Central High School was Christopher Gadsden Sayre (1876 - ca. 1935). Sayre was a native South Carolinian, born in Mt. Pleasant and educated at the South Carolina College, where in 1897 he took a degree in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Sayre was a prominent designer of school buildings in North and South Carolina. To date, twenty schools in South Carolina and thirty-six in North Carolina have been identified as designed by Sayre or by the firm of Sayre & Baldwin, with which he was associated from 1908-1914. Sayre is also credited with designing at least seven schools in Georgia.

The Central High School building was his sixth, and last, commission for a school before he became associated with James J. Baldwin in 1908. They opened their first office in Anderson, however, by 1914 their business had expanded sufficiently to open a second office in Raleigh, North Carolina. By 1915, Baldwin left the firm, and most of Sayre's work after 1918 was concentrated in North Carolina where he opened branch offices in Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and Asheville. In addition to schools, he also designed a number of county courthouses in the Carolinas, and Georgia. His more prominent courthouse designs include the Bleckley County Courthouse in Baldwin, Georgia (1913); the Moore county Courthouse in Carthedge, North Carolina (1922); and the Saluda County Courthouse in Saluda,
 
Central Caboose -<br>Located East of the Marker<br>Intersection of West Main and Church Streets Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
11. Central Caboose -
Located East of the Marker
Intersection of West Main and Church Streets
 
South Carolina (1917).
    — Submitted April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Morgan House - National Register Nomination Form (2001)
The Morgan House is a single-story, frame residence constructed in 1893 at what is presently 416 Church Street in Central, South Carolina. The house was originally constructed in the Queen Anne style and subsequently altered circa 1917 with Classical Revival design elements. It was built by Jeptha Norton Morgan, a prominent local merchant and banker, in anticipation of his marriage to Minnie Eugenia Morgan. The Morgan House was purchased in 1995 by the Central Heritage Society and is currently used as the Central History Museum.

The Morgan House is located on 2.775 acres on Church Street two blocks from the business district of Central. The immediate area is comprised of other historic single-family residences, historic Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, and non-historic apartment and governmental buildings. The immediate area is still largely residential in character. Main Street and the Norfolk Southern Railroad line are two blocks north of the Morgan House. The now demolished "Railroad Hotel" and railroad depot also were nearby and were the focal points of Central at the turn of the twentieth century. Jeptha Norton Morgan and
 
Freight Train Passing Through Central Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
12. Freight Train Passing Through Central
 
his brother F.A. Morgan owned Morgan's Store, which became one of the region's leading retail establishments serving travelers and nearby residents. Morgan's Store and the other important structures in Central were within easy walking distance of the Morgan House. The site has relatively level topography and the house has an eastern orientation, facing Church Street.

The Morgan House contains approximately 2,900 square feet on a single level over a crawl space. The foundation is brick and the exterior is lapped wood siding. The asymmetrical design has three bays on the front elevation with a main hipped roof complemented with porch and roof gables. Built originally in a Queen Anne gabled-ell design, the original elaborately detailed porch was altered prior to 1917 with Classical Revival detailing including Doric columns and the addition of porch gables with glass, classical motifs.

Except for the aforementioned Classical Revival modifications and the addition of a room at the rear of the house, the house remains largely unaltered. The exterior consists of wood siding with a prominent front porch partially wrapping both sides and adjoining a screened porch on the northern elevation. There also is a rear porch that was reconfigured with the rear addition of the house. The front and side porches feature Doric columns that are paired to flank the concrete steps at
 
Morgan House (1893)<br>416 Church Street image, Click for more information
By Brian Scott, January 9, 2009
13. Morgan House (1893)
416 Church Street
Listed in the National Register of Historic Places
March 29, 2001

Click for more information.
 
the front and side entrances. There are protruding bays on all elevations of the house. The windows are either two over two panes or one over one pane. Historic photographs reveal shutters were originally used on the front windows but subsequently removed at an undetermined date. There are two chimneys with distinctive masonry detailing.

The interior is characterized by a large living room that opens into a central hall. The original floor plan was typical of a Queen Anne gabled-ell design. Adjacent to the living room is the parlor with an octagonal bay featuring large two over two paned windows. There is a distinctive fireplace mantel with a beveled glass mirror. As with all rooms in the house, there is 12" floor molding. The parlor has picture molding and bead-board walls that are presently covered with wallpaper of indeterminable age. The dining room, kitchen and one bedroom opens to the central hall. All rooms with the exception of the kitchen have thirteen-foot high ceilings. The kitchen has a dropped ceiling with ceiling tiles. The rooms have plaster walls except for the parlor and a rear bedroom with bead board paneling. Floors are hardwood although the living room, dining room and parlor have a newer layer of hardwood flooring covering the original floors. All doors and windows have Late Victorian trim with rosettes. Several interior doors have transoms including
 
Morgan House<br>Front Porch Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, January 9, 2009
14. Morgan House
Front Porch
 
one door within the central hall that has distinctive Italianate detailing. Most of the door hardware is historic. There are eight fireplaces in the Morgan House with the original mantels in all rooms except the living room.

The Morgan House has limited alterations with the most noticeable modifications being the front porch alterations and the partial enclosure of the rear porch that coincided with the addition of a room at the rear of the house. The front porch was originally an elaborately detailed porch in a Queen Anne design. The original front porch columns and railings were removed circa 1917 and replaced with Doric columns. The porch was further altered with the addition of gables above the porch featuring glass classical motifs within the gables. Other alterations include a dropped ceiling with acoustical ceiling tile in the kitchen and contemporary wall paneling on the rear walls of the central hall adjacent to the kitchen. Other minor alterations include a modem HVAC system, the addition of a small restroom, and fluorescent lighting in two former bedrooms that are currently used as display rooms. Contemporary ceiling tile also has been added to one of the display rooms although this room still has the original ceiling height. The alterations have not compromised the overall historic character of the house.

A small lateral-gable frame shed with a metal
 
Clarence C. Phillips, Jr. Walking Track<br>South of the Caboose Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
15. Clarence C. Phillips, Jr. Walking Track
South of the Caboose
Plaque reads:
This walking track is
dedicated in memory
of
Clarence C. Phillips, Jr.

He served his community
as a Town Councilman
from October 1984 to
January 1994.
 
roof, probably constructed early in the twentieth century, also contributes to the significance of the nominated property.

Significance
The Morgan House is one of Central's most important architectural and historical landmarks and is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places under Criteria Band C. The former single-family residence is presently the home of the Central History Museum and is an excellent example of late nineteenth century Classical Revival residential architecture. The Morgan House also is significant for its association with Jeptha Norton Morgan and his family, prominent in the growth of Central's economy. Jeptha Morgan and his family contributed greatly to the social and civic life of Central during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The architecture of the Morgan House is significant because of its evolution from its original Queen Anne style to an early twentieth century Classical Revival architectural style. The Morgan House was constructed in 1893 in the Queen Anne style and subsequently altered circa 1917 with classical design elements. This transformation is representative of a wave of popularity that occurred during the first two decades of the twentieth century with renewed emphasis on classical architectural themes. This coincided with the decreasing popularity of the Queen Anne architectural
 
Gaines and Gassaway Store Photo, Click for full size
Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron
16. Gaines and Gassaway Store
When the railroad terminal moved to Greenvile, a few stories in Central closed. R.G. Gaines and Gassaway on Gains Street remained open and even expanded into a two-story brick store with an elevator. Gaines and Gassaway actively traded in general merchandise, farm livestock, and cotton bales. (Source: Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron (2000), pg 38.)
 
style during this time. The architectural transformation of the Morgan House is an excellent example of the later alterations becoming significant in their own right.

Jeptha Morgan was the son of Robert Finley Morgan, a prominent property owner in Pickens and Oconee County. Robert Finley Morgan owned considerable property along the Keowee River and much of the land that later became the central business district of Central. Robert Finley Morgan had six sons and three daughters. Two of the sons, Francis Burt (F.B.) and Jeptha Norton (J.N.), settled in Central to pursue business endeavors. In 1882, Francis and Jeptha Morgan established

F.B. and J.N. Morgan's Store, a mercantile retail establishment on property located on Main Street in Central. The property was purchased by their father in 1882 from J.C. Philpot. Morgan's Store provided groceries, clothing, and general supplies to the growing community of Central. By the early 1880's, Central had become a thriving railroad village benefiting from the completion in 1873 of the rail line through Central by the Atlanta and Richmond Air-Line Company that connected Charlotte and Atlanta. Central is halfway between the two cities and the railroad company established a terminal station where engines and train crews were changed and light repairs were made. Central, which derived its name from its location halfway (133
 
Bank of Central Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott
17. Bank of Central
The Bank of Central was chartered in 1904 and J.N. Morgan as its president. The Farmers Bank, located on Gaines Street, opened later with capital stock at $25,000. The town of Central advanced, but not without adversity. These two banks crashed with Wall Street in 1929. (Source: Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron (2000), pg 34.)
 
miles each way) between Atlanta and Charlotte, was incorporated on March 17, 1875. The economy of Central flourished with the arrival of the railroad, and stores were built near the depot offering supplies and food to travelers and rail employees.

In addition to the founding of Morgan's Store, Jeptha Morgan with his brother and three other businessmen, J.R. Falls, C.B. Smith, and T.M. Norris, founded the Bank of Central. Chartered on January 1, 1904 with deposits of $22,500, Jeptha Morgan was the first president of the bank and was later succeeded as president by his brother. The Bank of Central played an integral role with the development of Central's economy during the first three decades of the twentieth century. The Bank of Central did not survive the depression of the early 1930's. The bank had numerous loans on agricultural crops that it failed to collect during this time.

Morgan's Store did survive the Great Depression and continued to be a focal point of Central's economy as it rebounded. Located on Main Street, it was a retail destination where people purchased retail goods ranging from groceries to clothing to coffins. An early advertisement referred to Morgan's Store as "headquarters for dry goods, groceries, hats, shoes, hardware, clothing, wagons, buggies, furniture, coffins, tinware, crockery, school books, testaments, and Bibles." Morgan's Store
 
Central Mercantile Co. Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott
18. Central Mercantile Co.
The first settlers in the area of present-day Central were Methodist ministers. In 1873 the first post office was established as Centre. Its exact location remains a mystery, but national postal records indicate that in 1875 a second postmaster, Mr. Ross Eaton, replaced the first, Mr. George W. Burroughs. By this time, the town was referred to as Central since it was midway between Atlanta and Charlotte, about 133 miles from each. (Source: Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron (2000), pg 34.)
 
also provided employment for many of the young men and women of Central, and according to long-time resident Mrs. Mattie May Morgan Allen, it "seems like everybody in the community worked there at one time or another." The store's partnership of Jeptha and Francis Morgan ended with Francis's death in 1914 and Jeptha operated the store as sole proprietor until his death in 1923. His family continued to own the store until its closing in 1949. The Morgan Store was demolished in 1956 after Carolina National Bank bought the property.

In addition to Jeptha Morgan's positions as owner of Morgan's Store and founding president and director of the Bank of Central, he also was an officer in Central's first Masonic organization, Central Masonic Lodge. Chartered on December 10,1890, this Masonic organization was founded with fourteen members and met for a period of time upstairs in Morgan's Store. A new Masonic Hall was built on Gaines Street in Central in 1964.

Jeptha Morgan's role as a banker in Central led to his selection as a founding member of the board of the Bank of Commerce in Greenville. The Bank of Commerce was founded in March 1906 and was active in Greenville until 1926. Upon Jeptha Morgan's death in 1923, the Bank of Commerce board passed a resolution recognizing the value of his services and the loss "to the community of a kind, honest and generous hearted citizen."
 
Old Central City Hall<br>415 Gaines Street Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
19. Old Central City Hall
415 Gaines Street
Built of granite blocks during the 1920s, the building was used first as a jail for local offenders and as a city hall. In 1994, prior to acquisition of the Morgan House for use as a museum, Central City Council gave the Central Heritage Society permission to use the old jail as a museum. These plans have been put on hold. (Source: Welcome to Central, South Carolina brochure.)
 
Jeptha Morgan was buried in the cemetery of Mt. Zion Methodist Church. He was active in the church and was involved in the fundraising to build the new sanctuary and auditorium in 1922, shortly before his death.

Following his death on September 30, 1923, Jeptha Morgan's widow, Minnie Eugenia Morgan, continued to own Morgan's Store and play an active role in Central. Minnie and Jeptha had two daughters, Jessie Norton Morgan who was born May 27, 1898, and Jennie Eugenia Morgan who was born on July 10, 1901. Jessie died on November 16, 1999, and Jennie died on May 7, 1985. Both daughters were prominent citizens of Central and became leaders of Central's first Girl Scout troop that was organized in 1942. Both daughters resided in their parents' house for most of their lives. The residence at 416 Church Street became known as the Morgan House and was acquired in 1995 by the Central Heritage Society. It is currently the Central History Museum.
    — Submitted April 17, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. Daniel Keating Norris
Born Nov. 1, 1846 in Lower St. Matthews, Orangeburg Co., S.C. Father was George Norris, a farmer and planter. His mother was Amelia Avinger Norris, (1/24/1812 - 3/29/1883). His mother is buried in his family plot in Pendleton. His father is not buried there. His grandfather was Patrick Nash who came to Fairfield County, S.C. from Ireland and served in the Revolutionary War.

D.K. Norris served in Company F, Second Regiment, S.C. Heavy Artillery, rank of Private, and was badly wounded at the Battle of Bentonville, N.C.

His brother, George Manly Norris, born 1848, served as a Confederate Soldier for six months as a second Lieutenant of Company F, of the Second Regiment of the S.C. Junior Troops (he was only 16 years old). After the war G.M. Norris was a planter in Vance, S.C. D.K. Norris also had another brother, J.F. Norris, of Charleston, S.C.

D.K. Norris died at John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore Maryland on Jan. 23, 1905. He had been ill for some time and went to the hospital for diagnosis and treatment. He is buried in the family plot at the First Baptist Church in Pendleton, S.C. There is a large gravestone but there is no indication that D.K. Norris was a Confederate Veteran. He was given a military funeral.
 
Daniel Keating Norris<br>November 1, 1846-January 23, 1905 image, Click for more information
By Clemson University
20. Daniel Keating Norris
November 1, 1846-January 23, 1905
Norris served as a member of the Clemson Board of Trustees from 1888-1905. Norris Hall is named for him, as is the town of Norris, South Carolina.
Click for more information.
 
    — Submitted April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Issaqueena Mill Photo, Click for full size
Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron
21. Issaqueena Mill
D.K. Norris led fund-raising efforts to establish capital for the Issaqueena Mill. When the mill opened in 1904, kerosene lamps were used for lighting. Outhouses served as employee restrooms and the machinery was powered by steam engines and boilers, which were wood burners that were eventually replaced by coal burning units. In 1930 the mill went into receivership. During the Great Depression employees took a 15% cut in pay. The mill remained open under court order from 1930 until 1935, and by the 1950s Issaqueena Mill had become Plant No. 12 of the Cannon Mills Company. In 1970, the mill turned out 29 million yards of sheeting material. The plant employed about 345 people. (Source: Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron (2000), pg 38.)
 
 
Roller Mill Photo, Click for full size
Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron
22. Roller Mill
Organized in 1902 on Gaines Street, the Central Roller Mill has served the community throughout the 20th century. Occasionally the mill became idle, but with its contemporary additions the mill can produce 100 barrels of flour, 5,000 pounds of corn mill, and 15 tons of mixed feed per day. It operated at this capacity until the 1970s. Presently, the roller mill functions as a retail and warehouse space for an antiques store. (Source: Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron (2000), pg 36.)
 
 
Central Roller Mills<br>300 Madden Bridge Road Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
23. Central Roller Mills
300 Madden Bridge Road
Home of Central Roller Mills Antiques and Specialty Shop, an eclectic collection of antiques, memorabilia and interesting paraphernalia. This authentic roller mill is one of the few remaining examples of this type of structure. (Source: Welcome to Central, South Carolina brochure.)
 
 
Antique Wagon Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
24. Antique Wagon
 
 
Central Roller Mills Signage Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
25. Central Roller Mills Signage
 
 
Central Roller Mills Silos Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
26. Central Roller Mills Silos
 
 
Central Roller Mills Front Porch Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
27. Central Roller Mills Front Porch
 
 
Central Hotel Photo, Click for full size
Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron
28. Central Hotel
The Central Hotel served as a restaurant for passengers of the northbound No. 12 and the southbound No. 39 since the trains stopped in Central at noon. The thriving hostel also provided offices for telegraph operators and Southern Railroad ticketmasters. Sample rooms allowed drummers and traveling salesmen to easily display their products for the inspection of local merchants. Unfortunately, the railroad company's terminal facilities moved to Greenville in 1897, adversely affecting the hotel. It closed and became the residence of John Simms, a freight agent. In 1939 the building burned and it was never rebuilt. ((Source: Pickens County by Piper Peters Aheron (2000), pg 37.)
 
 
Southern Wesleyan University<br>907 Wesleyan Drive Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
29. Southern Wesleyan University
907 Wesleyan Drive
Founded in 1906 at its present location as Central Wesleyan College, the school is sponsored by the Wesleyan Church. The school operated as a junior college until 1959, when it became a senior liberal arts college. Its name was changed to Southern Wesleyan University in 1994. (Source: Welcome to Central, South Carolina brochure.)
 
 
Spirit of the Warrior Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
30. Spirit of the Warrior
Beyond the years yet to come
we honor those who
gave their best.

For hands that served,
hearts that loved,
minds that challenged,
and faith that
lifted us heavenward
to soar higher,
even as the eagles.
 
 
Rickman Library Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, March 6, 2010
31. Rickman Library
This building honors and is named for
Claude Roger Rickman
Dean of the College 1948 to 1968
President 1968 to 1979
Churchman and Educator
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,513 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13, 14. submitted on January 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15. submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   16, 17, 18. submitted on April 17, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   19, 20, 21. submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   22. submitted on April 17, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   23, 24, 25, 26, 27. submitted on April 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   28, 29, 30, 31. submitted on April 17, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
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