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Darien in McIntosh County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
The Burning of Darien
 
The Burning of Darien Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, August 2008
1. The Burning of Darien Marker
 
Inscription. On June 11, 1863 the seaport of Darien was vandalized and burned by Federal forces stationed on nearby St. Simons Island. The town was largely deserted, most of its 500 residents having sough refuge inland. Lost were public buildings, churches, businesses and most private residences. Conducting the raid were units comprised of among the first African-American troops to serve the Union cause, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers under Col. Robert G. Shaw, and the 2nd South Carolina Volunteers under Col. James Montgomery. The burning of Darien, undefended and of little strategic importance, was one of the most controversial events of the Civil War.
 
Erected 2001 by The Georgia Historical Society and Lower Altamaha Historical Society. (Marker Number 95-2.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 31° 22.144′ N, 81° 26.06′ W. Marker is in Darien, Georgia, in McIntosh County. Marker is on Washington St near N Way, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Darien City Hall, 1 block E of US 17. Marker is in this post office area: Darien GA 31305, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
 
The Burning of Darien Marker at Darien City Hall Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. The Burning of Darien Marker at Darien City Hall
 
. Methodists at Darien (within shouting distance of this marker); Oglethorpe Oak (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); McIntosh County (about 400 feet away); Fort King George (about 400 feet away); Darien (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named The Oglethorpe Oak (about 400 feet away); New Inverness (about 400 feet away); Port of Darien (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Darien.
 
Also see . . .
1. Longstreet Highroad Guide to the Georgia Coast & Okefenokee By Richard J. Lenz. (Submitted on August 28, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
2. Robert Gould Shaw. Shaw was promoted to major on March 31, 1863, and to colonel on April 17, so he was in charge of the 54th when they were ordered to loot and then burn the city of Darien, Georgia, on June 11, much to Shaw's dismay. The destruction of the undefended city of little strategic importance had been ordered by Colonel James Montgomery. (Submitted on August 28, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Colonel James Montgomery. James Montgomery (December 22, 1814 – December 6, 1871) was a notorious Jayhawker during the Bleeding Kansas Affair and a controversial Union colonel during the American Civil War. Montgomery was a staunch abolitionist and used extreme measures against pro-slavery populations. (Submitted on August 28, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional keywords. Shaw,U.S.C.T.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,616 times since then. Last updated on September 21, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 28, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
 
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