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Arlington in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Abingdon Plantation Restoration
 
Abingdon Plantation Restoration Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., June 12, 2008
1. Abingdon Plantation Restoration Marker
 
Inscription. The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority worked in concert with Federal, state and local historic preservation agencies and professionals in the field to develop the restoration plan for the Abingdon Plantation site. The restoration process involved:
careful excavation and cataloguing of all archaeological features below ground
repairs to the original brick foundations, retaining as much of the original building material as possible
restoring unstable portions of the original foundations using new building materials
providing new above-ground reconstructions of previously buried ruin features

[The remaining text from the marker is included in picture captions below]
 
Location. 38° 51.077′ N, 77° 2.677′ W. Marker is in Arlington, Virginia, in Arlington County. Click for map. Marker is located between the parking garages at Ronald Reagan National Airport. Marker is in this post office area: Arlington VA 22202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Abingdon (here, next to this marker); The Industrial Age (here, next to this marker); The Hunter Family (a few steps from this marker); Abingdon Plantation (a few steps from this marker); The Custis Family (a few steps from this marker); The Alexander Family (a few steps from this marker); The Ages of Abingdon (within shouting distance of this marker); Ronald Reagan (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Arlington.
 
Abingdon Plantation Restoration Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., June 12, 2008
2. Abingdon Plantation Restoration Marker
 

 
Additional comments.
1. "Abingdon House Ruins" photograph
The title and the caption beneath the photograph entitled "Abingdon House Ruins" are misleading. The caption contains a quotation from an inscription on the left side of the marker that describes a foundation. However, the photograph does not show any "ruins" or any actual foundation.

The structure in the foreground of the photo is actually an above-ground reconstruction of portions of an original structure that were previously buried. After excavation, cataloguing and repair, the original structure was reburied. I personally observed parts of this process.

For further information about the reconstruction, read the text of the primary inscription on the marker. The last line of the text states that the restoration process involved "providing new above-ground reconstructions of previously buried ruin features". The photograph shows one of these reconstructions.

I therefore suggest the following title for the photograph: "Reconstructed Abingdon House Foundation".
    — Submitted May 25, 2011, by Bernard H. Berne of Arlington, Virginia.
 
Reconstructed Abingdon House Foundation Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., June 12, 2008
3. Reconstructed Abingdon House Foundation
The brick foundation supported the house structure. Originally built in the 1740s, the house was of a typical colonial style featuring oak framework, brick side chimneys, a central hallway and a steep roof. In the 1850s, a second story was added with a pediment, wings, and front and back porches. These changes greatly altered the original appearance of the house.
 
 
Abingdon Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W.
4. Abingdon Marker
The Washington Branch of the Association for the Preservation for Virginia Antiquities placed this plaque in 1933 to commemorate the Abingdon Ruins.
 
 
Reconstructed Abingdon Kitchen/Laundry Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., June 12, 2008
5. Reconstructed Abingdon Kitchen/Laundry
Although detailed construction information is incomplete, this structure was probably used as a kitchen/laundry. Because kitchens had open hearths, they were located away from the main house to avoid fire damage. It was much easier to rebuild a burned kitchen than to replace a house. Archaeological investigations uncovered the foundation of a double hearth represented here.
 
 
Abingdon Plantation Restoration Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., June 12, 2008
6. Abingdon Plantation Restoration Marker
Artifacts have been recovered from archaeological excavations at this site. These artificacts and a more detailed history of Abingdon Plantation are housed within Historic Terminal A of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.
 
 
Abingdon Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., June 8, 2008
7. Abingdon Marker
Compound parlor hearths on the north end of the house.
 
 
Digging Through Layers Of Time exhibit Photo, Click for full size
By PaulwC3, December 23, 2011
8. Digging Through Layers Of Time exhibit
A display in Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Exhibit Hall of the artifacts unearthed at the Abingdon Plantation site.
 
 
Daily Life: Colonial Times at Abingdon Plantation exhibit Photo, Click for full size
By PaulwC3, December 23, 2011
9. Daily Life: Colonial Times at Abingdon Plantation exhibit
A display in Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Exhibit Hall of the artifacts unearthed at the Abingdon Plantation site.
 
 
Trade United Abingdon with the World exhibit Photo, Click for full size
By PaulwC3, December 23, 2011
10. Trade United Abingdon with the World exhibit
A display in Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Exhibit Hall of the artifacts unearthed at the Abingdon Plantation site.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on June 18, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,733 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 18, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on June 17, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on June 18, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   8, 9, 10. submitted on December 17, 2012, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Pictures of some of the actual artifacts recovered. They are currently displayed in Historic Terminal A of the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. • Can you help?
 
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