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Princeton Township in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Mercer Oak

 
 
The Mercer Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
1. The Mercer Oak Marker
Inscription. The Mercer Oak was named for Brigadier General Hugh Mercer, who fought and was mortally wounded in the Battle of Princeton, January 3, 1777. The white oak is believed to have been here at the time of the American Revolution.

A legend says that Mercer was bayoneted and was laid beneath this tree, refusing to leave the battle until victory was secured. He was actually wounded just uphill, behind enemy lines. Later recovered by his aids, Mercer was carried to the Thomas Clarke House, where he died nine days later. Besides the tree, this county and the nearby roadway are among the many things named in his honor.

Mercer (1725-77), born in Scotland, studied medicine at Aberdeen. As an assistant surgeon to the Scottish Jacobite Army he was present at their defeat by the English on Culloden Moor in 1746. Settling in Pennsylvania in 1747, Mercer served the English Provincial Army in the French and Indian War, attaining the rank of colonel. Moving to Fredericksburg, Virginia in 1761 he married, purchased Washington’s boyhood farm, and practiced medicine. As the Revolution began Mercer was named colonel of the 3rd Virginia regiment in 1775 and in 1776 became brigadier general under Washington.

Collapsing of old age on March 3, 2000, the Mercer Oak continues to be a well-recognized symbol of Princeton Township, of
The Mercer Oak in full glory image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
2. The Mercer Oak in full glory
Mercer Oak photograph courtesy of The Historical Society of Princeton
Mercer County, the New Jersey Green Acres Program, and other entities. An offspring donated by Louise Morse, started in 1981 from an acorn of the Mercer Oak, was plated next to the old stump in 2001.

Created by Chris Wang BSA Troop 88, Princeton, NJ - 1998
 
Erected by State of New Jersey, Division of Parks and Forestry.
 
Location. 40° 19.906′ N, 74° 40.585′ W. Marker is in Princeton Township, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker is on Mercer Street half a mile north of Parkside Drive, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. This marker is in an open field in the Princeton Battlefield Stae Park. Marker is in this post office area: Princeton NJ 08540, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonnade and Gravesite (within shouting distance of this marker); This is Hallowed Ground (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Historic Portico Preservation and Rebuilding (about 700 feet away); Burial Site of those who fell in the Battle of Princeton (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Moulder’s Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away); The British Occupation of New Jersey
The Thomas Clarke House on the hill image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
3. The Thomas Clarke House on the hill
past the flagpole is shown in the background of this 1800’s print as it looked during the Revolution. “Mercer’s Bayonetting” from Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey (Barber and Howe)
(approx. 0.2 miles away); General Hugh Mercer (approx. 0.2 miles away); From Trenton to Princeton (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Princeton Township.
 
Categories. EnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryNotable EventsNotable Persons
 
The Mercer Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, January 1, 2013
4. The Mercer Oak Marker
Some remains of the original Mercer Oak can still be seen behind the marker.
The new Mercer Oak and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, January 1, 2013
5. The new Mercer Oak and Marker
The oak tree seen to the right grew from a seedling of the oak tree under which Gen. Hugh Mercer was mortally wounded. That tree had been located just to the left of the marker.
The Mercer Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
6. The Mercer Oak Marker
Continential Troops on the Princeton Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 6, 2013
7. Continential Troops on the Princeton Battlefield
Two lines of American troops advance on the enemy from the site of the Mercer Oak.
The New Mercer Oak image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 4, 2008
8. The New Mercer Oak
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,111 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey.   7. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   8. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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