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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rice in Prince Edward County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

High Bridge

 
 
High Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Laura Troy, July 23, 2008
1. High Bridge Marker
Inscription. One mile north stood the Southside Railroad Bridge, spanning the 75-foot-wide Appomattox River. On 6 April, 1865, nine hundred Union soldiers attempting to burn the 2500-foot-long, 126-foot-high structure were captured by Confederate cavalry. Crossing on 7 April, retreating Confederates burned four spans but failed to destroy the lower wagon bridge thus allowing Union soldiers to cross and attack at Cumberland Church north of Farmville.
 
Erected 1989 by Virginia Historic Landmark Commission. (Marker Number F 73.)
 
Location. 37° 16.517′ N, 78° 19.404′ W. Marker is near Rice, Virginia, in Prince Edward County. Marker is at the intersection of Prince Edward Highway (U.S. 460) and County Route 640, on the right when traveling west on Prince Edward Highway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rice VA 23966, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cavalry Battle at High Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Cavalry Battle at High Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Rice’s Depot (approx. 1.8 miles away); a different marker also
High Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
2. High Bridge Marker
named Rice’s Depot (approx. 1.8 miles away); Action at High Bridge (approx. 2.2 miles away); Battle of Sailor's Creek (approx. 2.2 miles away); African-Americans at High Bridge (approx. 2.3 miles away); Camp Paradise (approx. 2.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Rice.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lee's Retreat. Map and tour guide to key locations along the retreat route. (Submitted on August 14, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. High Bridge over the Appomattox River. Wikipedia entry. “Rebuilt after the Civil War to its former dimensions, the 21-span structure was 2,400 feet (730 m) long at a maximum height of 160 feet (49 m) above the Appomattox River Valley. Its owner, Norfolk and Southern, has abandoned the corridor, gifting 33 miles of the line to the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. (Submitted on April 28, 2012.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. High Bridge has opened to the public.
A foot trail along the High Bridge Trail takes visitors
High Bridge - Before Modifications for Trail Use image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. High Bridge - Before Modifications for Trail Use
Looking from the north bridge abutment across the bridge. The iron bridge dating to the early 20th century stands, and pillars of the wartime bridge, to the right of the trusses, remain.
to the bridge which is open to the public. The bridge crosses the Appomattox. The entire High Bridge Trail will eventually 34 miles long and still in development. To see the site of High Bridge from Farmville, head north out of town on Route 45, cross the river then turn east on River Road and continue 3 miles to a parking area. Be prepared for a walk and take some water. The bridge is a mile walk southeast of River Road, but well worth the hike.
    — Submitted April 26, 2012, by Bruce RInehart of Virginia Beach, Virginia.

 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
High Bridge Today image. Click for full size.
By Bruce RInehart, April 10, 2012
4. High Bridge Today
The bridge is safe for hikers, bicycles, and horses.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Laura Troy of Burke, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,354 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Laura Troy of Burke, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Bruce RInehart of Virginia Beach, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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