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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newport News, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Great Confederate Naval Victory

 
 
A Great Confederate Naval Victory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
1. A Great Confederate Naval Victory Marker
Inscription. On March 8, 1862, the day before her epic battle with the U.S.S. Monitor, the Confederate ironclad ram Virginia (formerly the U.S.S. Merrimack) engaged and sank in the James River two powerful Union sailing Ships of War, the U.S.S. Cumberland and the U.S.S. Congress, and also silenced Union shore batteries on the bluffs at Newport News.

Despite the gallant defense of these vessels, that day’s action vividly demonstrated the superiority of metal over wood. The victory was a high point in the hopes of the Confederacy.

The sinking of these powerful wooden warships was witnessed with dismay by Federal forces at Camp Butler which then included the site of this park. The length of anchor chain from the U.S.S. Cumberland displayed here was recovered from the river bottom in 1909.
 
Location. 36° 58.681′ N, 76° 26.017′ W. Marker is in Newport News, Virginia. Marker is on West Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at entrance to Christopher Newport Park. Marker is in this post office area: Newport News VA 23607, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Newport News (here, next to this marker); A Nameless Grave (within shouting distance of this marker); Collis Potter Huntington
Marker at Christopher Newport Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
2. Marker at Christopher Newport Park
(within shouting distance of this marker); Newport News Point (within shouting distance of this marker); Congress – Cumberland (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters, Hampton Roads (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Newport News Victory Arch (about 500 feet away); The Victory Arch (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Newport News.
 
Also see . . .  CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and USS Congress, 8 March 1862. Naval Historical Center website. (Submitted on August 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, US Civil
 
Marker at Congress & Cumberland Overlook image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
3. Marker at Congress & Cumberland Overlook
The battle that occurred near here marked the end of the age of wooden naval vessels.
Anchor Chain of the U.S.S. Cumberland image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
4. Anchor Chain of the U.S.S. Cumberland
First victim of an ironclad warship in history, sunk March 8, 1862 by the C.S.S. Virginia. This chain is now on display at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond.
James River Overlook image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 11, 2008
5. James River Overlook
In these waters on March 8, 1862, the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia attacked and sank the U.S.S. Cumberland and U.S.S. Congress, and crippled the U.S.S. Minnesota.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,102 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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