Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sandston in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Seven Pines

Bloody Stalemate

 

—1862 Peninsula Campaign —

 
Seven Pines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. Seven Pines Marker
Inscription. Confederate attacks on May 31, 1862, designed to push the Union army away from Richmond, struck an isolated wing of the Federal Fourth Corps in this vicinity.

The heaviest action took place along the Williamsburg Road. Marching from the west, men of Gen. D.H. Hill’s Division broke Gen. Silas Casey’s line and pushed on toward the Seven Pines crossroads east of here. Close-quarters fighting raged in and around Casey’s Redoubt, which stood close to this spot. Hill’s attack unleashed “the most terrible fire of musketry … that I have ever witnessed,” thought Casey.

Late in the day, Confederate leader Gen. Joseph E. Johnston fell wounded north of here at Fair Oaks. The next day, Gen. Robert E. Lee took command of the army. The encounter at Seven Pines was the largest battle fought in Virginia during the first 14 months of the Civil War. There were more than 70,000 troops engaged and at least 10,000 casualties.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War, and the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 31.364′ N, 77° 18.74′ W. Marker is in Sandston, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker is on E Williamsburg
Battle Map from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
2. Battle Map from Marker
The most intense fighting of the battle occurred along this stretch of the Williamsburg Road.
Road (U.S. 60), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in the parking lot of the Sandston Library. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23 E. Williamsburg Road, Sandston VA 23150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battlefield of Seven Pines (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battlefield of Seven Pines (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); McClellan’s First Line (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battlefield of Seven Pines (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sandston (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Battlefield of Seven Pines (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Battlefield of Seven Pines (approx. 0.4 miles away); McClellan’s Picket Line (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Sandston.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains “A June 1862 photograph of Union artillery positions along the Williamsburg Road near here.” There is also a map showing troop positions at the time of the battle.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a Virtual Tour by Markers of the Battle of Seven Pines. Unfortunately the Seven Pines & Fair Oaks battlefields were lost to development long ago.
 
Also see . . .
1. Seven Pines. CWSAC Battle Summaries website. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Seven Pines. Detailed information of the Seven Pines battle. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. Tidewater Virginia, The 1862 Peninsula Campaign. Civil War Traveler. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,773 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement