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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Carroll

Civil War Defenses of Washington

 

1861-1865

 
Fort Carroll Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
1. Fort Carroll Marker
Inscription. Earthworks of Fort Carroll are visible 100 yards to the right at the top of the hill.

Fort Carroll was named in honor of Maj. Gen. Samuel Sprigg Carroll, a West Point graduate from the District of Columbia.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 50.223′ N, 77° 0.417′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE 0.1 miles north of South Capitol Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located in the Fort Carroll Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3720 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE, Washington DC 20032, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. In Memory of Col. Raynal C. Bolling (approx. 0.4 miles away); Republic F-105D Thunderchief (approx. 0.6 miles away); Fort Greble (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bolling Air Force Base (approx. 0.9 miles away); Giesboro Park (approx. 0.9 miles away); Original Federal Boundary Stone Southeast 6
Maj. Gen. Samuel Spriggs "Red" Carroll image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
2. Maj. Gen. Samuel Spriggs "Red" Carroll
(approx. 1.1 miles away); Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 6 (approx. 1.1 miles away but has been reported missing); Original Federal Boundary Stone Southeast 7 (approx. 1.1 miles away in Maryland).
 
More about this marker. The marker displays a plan of Fort Carroll from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. A map shows other Civil War fortifications surrounding Washington, D.C. administered by the park service. The bottom of the marker is a wartime photo, used on many markers of this series, of a gun at Fort Totten, captioned During the Civil War, Washington's forts overlooked farm land.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Carroll. National Park Service page on the fort and nearby Fort Greble. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Samuel S. Carroll. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Fort Carroll Particulars
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

The fort had a perimeter of 340 yards. It covered what was Piscataway Road, passing up Oxen Run. Battery Carroll, with four
Close Up of the Fort Plan and Map of other Forts image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
3. Close Up of the Fort Plan and Map of other Forts
unoccupied positions and another small redoubt were outer works to Fort Carroll

In 1862 armament included two 8-inch siege howitzers, four 32-pdr. seacoast guns, six 12-pdr field guns, one 30-pdr Parrott rifle, and one 24-pdr. Coehorn mortar. However by 1864 the armament had evolved to one 12-pdr field gun, twelve 32-pdr seacoast guns, one 8-inch siege howitzer, two 30-pdr Parrott rifles, and one 24-pdr Coehorn mortar.

Units which spent time at this fort included the 70th New York Infantry, 4th and 10th New York Heavy Artillery, 17th and 19th Maine Heavy Artillery, 9th Rhode Island Infantry, and 8th Massachusetts Heavy Artillery.

In addition to the fortifications, the grounds became an administrative hub for this section of the Washington Defenses, including hospitals, provost marshal facilities, and garrison headquarters. After the war the fort was used for a short time by the Signal Corps.
    — Submitted August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Fort Carroll Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
4. Fort Carroll Marker
The fort and battery remains are behind the marker to the west of the avenue.
View westward from near Fort Carroll Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 27, 2009
5. View westward from near Fort Carroll Marker
South Capitol Street intersection with the Anacostia Freeway (I-295), Bolling Air Base beyond, and downtown Washington in the background across the Potomac River.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,474 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016.
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