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Near Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Birthplace of Calhoun
 
Birthplace of Calhoun Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Anna Inbody, May 28, 2011
1. Birthplace of Calhoun Marker
 
Inscription.
On this land settled by his father Patrick Calhoun in the 1750s, defended against the Indians in the Cherokee War and the enemies of liberty in the American Revolution, John Caldwell Calhoun, American statesman and champion of the old South, was born March 18, 1782, and nurtured to young manhood.
 
Erected 1962 by Abbeville County Historic Society. (Marker Number 1-5.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Abbeville County Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 3.598′ N, 82° 26.986′ W. Marker is near Abbeville, South Carolina, in Abbeville County. Marker is on Mt. Carmel Road (State Highway 823). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Abbeville SC 29620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Boone (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing); Calhoun Mill (approx. 2.4 miles away but has been reported missing); Battle of Long Cane (approx. 3.7 miles away); Forest Lawn Memory Gardens Veterans Monument (approx. 3.9 miles away); Lebanon Presbyterian Church (approx. 4.2 miles away); Mt. Carmel Historical District (approx. 4.9 miles away); Fort Charlotte (approx. 5 miles away); Patrick Calhoun Burial Grounds (approx. 5.6 miles away); Parsons Mountain World War II Memorial (approx. 5.9 miles away); Parsons Mountain (approx. 5.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Abbeville.
 
Birthplace of Calhoun Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
2. Birthplace of Calhoun Marker
 

 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. These markers trace Calhoun's life in South Carolina.
 
Also see . . .
1. John C. Calhoun. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. (Submitted on August 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. John C. Calhoun by Holley Ulbrich. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782-March 31, 1850) was a United States representative, senator, secretary of war, secretary of state, and vice president. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John C. Calhoun in the U.S. Capital. In the struggles for power leading up to the Civil War one name that was heard again and again was that of John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. John C. Calhoun: Clemson University. "Free trade; low duties; no debt; separation from banks; economy; retrenchment, and strict adherence to the Constitution," read the campaign slogan of the Honorable John C. Calhoun during his last major bid for the presidency of the United States in 1843. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. "Slavery a Positive Good" a speech by John C. Calhoun, February 6, 1837. I do not belong, said Mr. C., to the school which holds that aggression is to be met by concession. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Birthplace of Calhoun - Present Condition Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
3. Birthplace of Calhoun - Present Condition
 

6. "The Clay Compromises", a speech by John C. Calhoun, March 4, 1850. This is among John C. Calhoun's most famous speeches. He was too ill to deliver it himself, so it was read by another senator with Calhoun present in the Senate Chamber. Calhoun, so ill he had to be helped out of the Chamber after the speech by two of his friends, died on March 31, 1850. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN-630). USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN-630), a James Madison-class fleet ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for John C. Calhoun (1782–1850), the distinguished legislator. (Submitted on September 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN 630) Veterans Association. The ship, USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN 630), was a Fleet Ballistic Missile nuclear submarine; whose sole purpose was to be part of this nations "triad" of nuclear deterrence. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. John C. Calhoun
For over 30 years, this son of South Carolina made sure his voice was heard in Washington. Calhoun held high-level positions in several administrations.

He
 
John C. Calhoun<br>1782-1850 Photo, Click for full size
1830
4. John C. Calhoun
1782-1850
U.S. House of Rep from S.C. 1811–1817
U.S. Sec of War 1817–1825
V.P. of the U.S. 1825–1832
U.S. Sen from S.C. 1832–1843
U.S. Sec of State 1844–1845
U.S. Sen from S.C. 1845–1850
 
was born near Calhoun Mills, Abbeville District (now Mount Carmel, McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. He graduated from Yale College in 1804, studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1807. He set up a practice in Abbeville, S.C.

His political life began in 1808 when he was elected as a member of the State House of Representatives (1808-1809). He was elected as a Democratic Republican to the 12th Congress on March 4, 1811. He remained a member until November 3, 1817, when he resigned, accepting the position of Secretary of War under President James Monroe (1817-1825). Calhoun was elected vice president of the United States in 1824 under President John Quincy Adams and in 1828 under President Andrew Jackson. He served under Jackson until December 28, 1832, when he resigned (making Calhoun the only vice president to ever resign).

Calhoun was then elected as a Democratic Republican (later Nullifier) to the United States Senate on December 12, 1832, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Robert Y. Hayne. He was reelected in 1834 and 1840 and served from December 29, 1832, until his resignation, on March 3, 1843, at which time he accepted the position of Secretary of State under President John Tyler (1844-1845). He was again elected to the United States Senate, this time as a Democrat, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Daniel E. Huger.
 
USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN-630) Photo, Click for full size
By U.S. Navy, 1991
5. USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN-630)
 
He was reelected in 1846 and served from November 26, 1845, until his death in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850.

Once he was elected to federal office, Calhoun moved from Abbeville and took up residency in Fort Hill, now on the Clemson University campus. It was here that he lived with his wife (and cousin) Floride Colhoun and three children: Cornelia, John, and Anna Maria. Anna Marie later married a wealthy planter named Thomas Green Clemson, the namesake and founder of Clemson University.

John C. Calhoun is buried in St. Philip’s Churchyard, Charleston, S.C. In 1957, a U.S. Senate committee chaired by Senator John F. Kennedy, named the Five Greatest Senators in U.S. History. The list in order was:

1) Henry Clay (KY)
2) John C. Calhoun (SC)
3) Daniel Webster (MA)
4) Robert Taft (OH)
5) Robert La Follette, Sr. (WI)

In 2004, the Senate added Arthur Vandenberg (MI) and Robert Wagner (NY) to the list.
    — Submitted July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. John C. Calhoun (1782-1850)
Calhoun, John Caldwell, (cousin of John Ewing Colhoun and Joseph Calhoun), a Representative and a Senator from South Carolina and a Vice President of the United States; born near Calhoun Mills, Abbeville District (now Mount Carmel, McCormick County),
 
Abbeville Square "Law Range"<br>Where Calhoun Practiced Law Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 20, 2009
6. Abbeville Square "Law Range"
Where Calhoun Practiced Law
 
S.C., March 18, 1782; attended the common schools and private academies; graduated from Yale College in 1804; studied law, admitted to the bar in 1807, and commenced practice in Abbeville, S.C.; also engaged in agricultural pursuits; member, State house of representatives 1808-1809; elected as a Democratic Republican to the Twelfth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1811, to November 3, 1817, when he resigned; Secretary of War in the Cabinet of President James Monroe 1817-1825; elected vice president of the United States in 1824 with President John Quincy Adams; reelected in 1828 with President Andrew Jackson and served from March 4, 1825, to December 28, 1832, when he resigned, having been elected as a Democratic Republican (later Nullifier) to the United States Senate on December 12, 1832, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Robert Y. Hayne; reelected in 1834 and 1840 and served from December 29, 1832, until his resignation, effective March 3, 1843; Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President John Tyler 1844-1845; again elected to the United States Senate, as a Democrat, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Daniel E. Huger; reelected in 1846 and served from November 26, 1845, until his death in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850; chairman, Committee on Finance (Twenty-ninth Congress); interment in St. Philip’s Churchyard, Charleston, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted April 4, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Quotes from John C. Calhoun
"A power has risen up in the government greater than the people themselves, consisting of many and various and powerful interests, combined into one mass, and held together by the cohesive power of the vast surplus in the banks."

"Beware the wrath of a patient adversary."

"In looking back, I see nothing to regret and little to correct."

"The Government of the absolute majority instead of the Government of the people is but the Government of the strongest interests; and when not efficiently checked, it is the most tyrannical and oppressive that can be devised."

"It is harder to preserve than to obtain liberty."

"Learn from your mistakes and build on your successes."

"The interval between the decay of the old and the formation and establishment of the new constitutes a period of transition which must always necessarily be one of uncertainty, confusion, error, and wild and fierce fanaticism."

"The surrender of life is nothing to sinking down into acknowledgment of inferiority."
    — Submitted May 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. Marker Style
The marker shown reflects the earliest style of South Carolina Historical Markers. It was in use between 1955 and 1990. The original design was cast aluminum and crowned with a bas relief of the state flag surrounded by an inverted triangle. The markers were painted dark blue with silver lettering.
    — Submitted September 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Credits. This page originally submitted on July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 4,442 times since then. Last updated on August 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. Photos:   1. submitted on August 16, 2011, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on November 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on July 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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