Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Benning Ridge in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Chaplin

Civil War Defenses of Washington

 

1861-1865

 
Fort Chaplin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
1. Fort Chaplin Marker
Inscription. Earthworks of Fort Chaplin are visible through the wooded areas at the top of the hill.

Fort Chaplin was named in honor of Col. Daniel Chaplin, who was mortally wounded on August 17, 1864, at Deep Bottom, Virginia.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.231′ N, 76° 56.436′ W. Marker is in Benning Ridge, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Texas Avenue SE and C Street SE, on the right when traveling south on Texas Avenue SE. Click for map. Located in Fort Chaplin Park in the Benning Heights neighborhood. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Woodlawn Cemetery (approx. mile away); Fort Mahan (approx. half a mile away); Fort DuPont (approx. one mile away); A Whirl on the Ferris Wheel (approx. one mile away); Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 1 (approx. one mile away); Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 2 (approx. 1.1 miles away); Designed to Compete (approx. 1.1 miles away); With These Hands (approx. 1.1 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
Close Up of the Fort Plan and Map of other Forts image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
2. Close Up of the Fort Plan and Map of other Forts
The marker displays a plan of Fort Chaplin from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. A map shows other Civil War fortifications surrounding Washington, D.C. administered by the park service. The bottom of the marker is a wartime photo, used on many markers of this series, of a gun at Fort Totten, captioned During the Civil War, Washington's forts overlooked farm land.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Chaplin. National Park Service page on the fort. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Col. Daniel Chaplin. (Submitted on March 22, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Fort Chaplin Particulars
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

Fort Chaplin was part of a group of works defending the approaches to Benning Bridge. Other forts included "Fort of Circular Form," also called Fort Craven or Skaggs after the landowners, which stood to the south. Another fort in this set was "Fort on Kennedy's Hill," also named Fort Sedgwick.

Fort Chaplin, and likely none of the other forts for that matter, were garrisoned full time. However Fort Chaplin had one 24-pdr seacoast gun mounted.
Entrance to Fort Chaplin Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
3. Entrance to Fort Chaplin Park
    — Submitted August 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Fort Chaplin Seen from the Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 7, 2008
4. Fort Chaplin Seen from the Road
<center>Col. Daniel Chaplin, C.O. 1st Maine Volunteer Heavy Artillery image. Click for full size.
5.
Col. Daniel Chaplin, C.O. 1st Maine Volunteer Heavy Artillery
- from 1903's The First Maine Heavy Artillery, 1861-1865 by Horace H. Shaw and Charles J. House (contributed to "Find-a-Grave" by William McKern).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,280 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page was last revised on January 23, 2017.
Paid Advertisement