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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anderson in Anderson County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

World War I Memorial

 
 
World War I Memorial Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 23, 2008
1. World War I Memorial Plaque
Inscription.
Dedicated to the memory of
our comrades who entered the
service of their country
from Anderson County
and who gave their lives in
the World War
-------
Dedicated by
W.A. Hudgens Post No. 14,
American Legion
November 11, 1934

 
Erected 1934 by American Legion, W.H. Hudgens Unit No. 14.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Spirit of the American Doughboy - E. M. Viquesney marker series.
 
Location. 34° 31.498′ N, 82° 38.511′ W. Marker is in Anderson, South Carolina, in Anderson County. Marker is on East Greenville Street (State Highway 81), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located in front of the American Legion, W.A. Hudgens Post No. 14 on East Greenville Street. Marker is in this post office area: Anderson SC 29621, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Anderson, S.C. (here, next to this marker); World War I and II Veterans (here, next to this marker); Korean War / Viet Nam Veterans (here, next to this marker); The J.E. Rouse Dormitory (approx. 0.7 miles away); The H.H. Watkins Teaching Center
World War I Memorial Base<br>Former image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 23, 2008
2. World War I Memorial Base
Former
The Spirit of the American Doughboy statue was damaged by vandals in 2008. The statue was restored and unveiled on Veterans Day 2011 (November 11).
(approx. 0.7 miles away); Anderson College Infirmary (approx. ĺ mile away); Denmark Hall (approx. 0.8 miles away); Temple B'Nai Isreal (approx. 0.8 miles away); Pratt Hall (approx. 0.8 miles away); Vandiver Hall (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Anderson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Vandals destroy American Legion's doughboy statue. Anderson police are looking for the vandals who ripped down the “doughboy statue” on Greenville Street, crumbling it into 50-plus pieces in what some believe was an attempt to salvage the memorial for the value of its metal. (Submitted on September 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Rising from the rubble: Doughboy heads to Columbia for restoration. The remains of “The Spirit of the Doughboy” lay wrapped in a gray rug, in the back of a metallic blue sport utility vehicle on Monday, taking its second trip south to Columbia. (Submitted on September 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Putting Doughboy Back Together, Again. Andersonís “Spirit of the American Doughboy” statue, which was broken into more than 50 pieces three years ago, may be saved by its look-a-like
World War I Memorial<br>Restored image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2011
3. World War I Memorial
Restored
located just two hours south of Anderson. (Submitted on November 10, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Welcome home, Doughboy. A new, shiny bronze “Spirit of the American Doughboy” statue took its place atop a cement pedestal on East Greenville Street on Tuesday after vandals broke the original one three years ago. (Submitted on November 10, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Anderson Independent Photo Galleries Ľ Spirit of American Doughboy Arrives. Spirit of American Doughboy statue arrives at the American Legion hut grounds on East Greenville Street in Anderson. (Submitted on November 10, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Community Gathers to Salute Andersonís 'Spirit of the American Doughboy'. James “Ott” Reed saluted the “Spirit of the American Doughboy” with pride Friday as a bugler blew taps in the distance at American Legion Post 14 on East Greenville Street in Anderson. (Submitted on November 11, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Spirit of the American Doughboy. The Spirit of the American Doughboy is a pressed copper sculpture by E.M. Viquesney, designed to honor the veterans and casualties of World War I. (Submitted on September 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. The E. M. Viquesney "Spirit of the American Doughboy" Database. On this website, researcher Earl Goldsmith and I have documented
World War I Memorial<br>Spirit of the American Doughboy image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2011
4. World War I Memorial
Spirit of the American Doughboy
every known location of E.M. Viquesney's World War I memorial, "The Spirit of the American Doughboy". (Submitted on September 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, World I
 
World War I Memorial<br>American Legion, Ralph J. Ramer Hut<br>W.A. Hudgens Post #14 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2011
5. World War I Memorial
American Legion, Ralph J. Ramer Hut
W.A. Hudgens Post #14
American Legion, Ralph J. Ramer Hut<br>W.A. Hudgens Post #14 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 23, 2008
6. American Legion, Ralph J. Ramer Hut
W.A. Hudgens Post #14
British 60-pounder Field Gun Mark II<br>Located Near the Doughboy Statue image. Click for more information.
By Brian Scott, August 23, 2008
7. British 60-pounder Field Gun Mark II
Located Near the Doughboy Statue
Officially called M1918, this British made field gun was used by the United States Army during World War I. Brought home with the soldiers at the end of the war, many of these guns were given back to the British at the start of World War II as part of Lend-Lease.
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,301 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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