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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Oldest Post of the Corps

Tour of Duty

 

—Barracks Row Heritage Trail —

 
Oldest Post of the Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2008
1. Oldest Post of the Corps Marker
Inscription. On your left is Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., the oldest continuously manned post in the U.S. Marine Corps. The installation was originally designed by architect George Hadfield in 1801 with a central parade ground and housing for 500 enlisted and officers in addition to the Commandant's Quarters (in mid-block across the street). This elegant 23-room house, enhanced in 1901 by a mansard roof, is the only remaining original structure.

When the U.S. government moved from Philadelphia to Washington City in 1800, the Marine Corps came as well to protect all federal buildings. At first the Marines camped in Georgetown and on E Street, NW. In March 1801, President Thomas Jefferson, accompanied by Marine Lieutenant Colonel William Ward Burroughs, selected this site for the Marine Barracks. It was near the Navy Yard and within easy marching distance to the Capitol and the President's House in case of trouble.

During the War of 1812, the Marine Barracks was one of the few public structures not destroyed by the British invaders. One local legend explains that British General Ross, after witnessing the Marines at the Battle of Bladensburg, ordered it spared "as a gesture of soldierly respect."

The Marines defended Washington in the War of 1812 and have fought on land and sea in every U.S. conflict since. (With
Oldest Post of the Corps Marker reverse image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 29, 2016
2. Oldest Post of the Corps Marker reverse
thanks for research by Lena Kaljot, Marine Corps Historical Center.)
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC, Barracks Row Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 5.)
 
Location. 38° 52.88′ N, 76° 59.635′ W. Marker is in Capitol Hill, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of G Street , SE and 9th Street, SE, on the right when traveling west on G Street , SE. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20390, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Neighborhood For Everyone (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Healing the Wounded (about 500 feet away); Commerce and Community (about 500 feet away); Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. (about 700 feet away); Strike Up the Band (approx. 0.2 miles away); John Philip Sousa (approx. 0.2 miles away); Christ Church and Its Parishioners (approx. 0.2 miles away); In the Alley (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Capitol Hill.
 
More about this marker. Several photos are arranged around the text. From top to bottom those are captioned:
Two members of the world-famous U.S. Marine Silent Drill Team perform an over-the-shoulder rifle exchange in 1978. The Barracks is both home and
Oldest Post of the Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 29, 2016
3. Oldest Post of the Corps Marker
The Commandant's Quarters can be seen in the background in this view of the marker to the west along G Street SE.
public performance space for special Marine ceremonial units.

In 1857 Marines defended Washingtonians against election day rioters at the Northern Liberty Market in Mount Vernon Square, sit of today's City Museum on K Street, NW.

Marine officers with the Commandant's Quarters in the background, 1896.

In 1814 British soldiers burned much of official Washington, but the Marine Barracks was spared.

A Marine Barracks squad room on the eve of World War I.

 
Also see . . .  Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. (Submitted on August 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. "Eighth and Eye"
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable BuildingsNotable PlacesWar of 1812
 
Commandant's Quarters, Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2008
4. Commandant's Quarters, Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C.
Current security restrictions prohibit wide-angle photos of the building.
The Commandant's Quarters image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 29, 2016
5. The Commandant's Quarters
Marine Guards at the site currently allow photographs of the Quarters.
National Historic Landmark, 1976 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2008
6. National Historic Landmark, 1976
View of the Barracks' parade ground, circa 1905-08 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2008
7. View of the Barracks' parade ground, circa 1905-08
Photo from reverse side of Marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,879 times since then and 9 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   6, 7. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 30, 2016.
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