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York in York County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

York County Confederate Monument

 
 
Our Confederate Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
1. Our Confederate Dead Marker
Inscription.
(Front):
Lest We Forget
1861-1865
Our Confederate Dead

(Side):
In Eternal Remembrance,
"Of the Soldiers tried and true,
Who bore the flag of a Nation's trust,
And fell in a cause
Though lost, still just
And died for me and you"

(Side):
Those for whom they died
Have erected this Monument
To recall To their Children and
Fellow country men
How worthily they lived,
How nobly they died
And in what tender reverence
Their memory survives.

 
Erected 1906 by Winnie Davis Chapter U.D.C.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 34° 59.497′ N, 81° 14.18′ W. Marker is in York, South Carolina, in York County. Marker is on East Liberty Street (State Highway 5). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: York SC 29745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trinity M. E. Church, South (approx. mile away); Town of Yorkville / Town of York (approx. 0.3 miles away); Barnett Brothers Circus, 1929 ~ 1945 / Bennett Brothers Circus, 1929 ~ 1938
Side Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
2. Side Inscription
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Bratton House Site / Jefferson Davis's Flight (approx. 0.4 miles away); York County Courthouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); Historic York (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); David E. Finley Birthplace (approx. half a mile away); King's Mountain Military Academy Site / Micah Jenkins (approx. 0.9 miles away); King's Mountain Battleground (approx. 3.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in York.
 
Also see . . .  York Historic District. Rosewood Cemetery is included boundary of the York Historic District. (Submitted on February 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About the York County Confederate Monument
Citizens of York contributed most of the $1,200 raised for the monument. The U.D.C. accepted the monument in November 1906. Although there was some sentiment among the surviving veterans for placing the monument on the courthouse square, the ladies decided
Side Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
3. Side Inscription
to erect it on the beautiful knoll at Rose Hill cemetery so it would overlook the "city of the dead" and be visible to all who entered the city via the nearby Southern Railroad.

The Granite and Marble Works of Georgia made the granite shaft, which remains in its original location. The designer was Happerfield Marble Works of York. William Henry Trescot wrote the inscription on the east face. He composed it in the late 1870s for use on the South Carolina monument in Columbia, but when it was discovered that only two of the faces on the Columbia monument were suitable for engraving, a significant portion of Trescot's memorial had to be discarded. That inscription, recorded in full under the Columbia monument was paraphrased and used on this monument.

On June 7, 1907, the dedication ceremony was held before a crowd of 4,000. Governor Martin F. Ansel was the honored guest. Colonel Asbury Coward was the orator of the day. Ansel and Coward arrived from Columbia by train and were welcomed by a large concourse...Mayor John R. Hart called the ceremony to order. Hart noted that because the South was unable to pension the veterans of the Confederacy adequately, it was through the erection of monuments that the women could best express their love. Walter B. Moore then briefly outlined the history of the movement to erect the monument and introduced Governor Ansel...He reminded
Our Confederate Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
4. Our Confederate Dead Marker
the crowd that they were there not because of a monument but because of a monument to the Confederate soldier...Ansel concluded by saying, "God bless the veterans of the Confederacy. God bless the women of the Confederacy and may the day never come when the people will cease to appreciate the significance of a monument such as this."...Colonel Coward spoke for nearly an hour. He said the monument would stand for generations to show all who pass that in its graceful proportions, it commands the great deeds, the valorous achievements, the God-directed purposes of the Confederate soldier. (Source: A Guide to Confederate Monuments in South Carolina: "Passing the Silent Cup", Robert S. Seigler (1997), pgs. 510-512.) Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted February 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. About the Winnie Davis Chapter U.D.C.
The Winnie Davis Chapter U.D.C. was named in honor of Jefferson Davis' daughter, Varina Anne Winnie Davis. Confederate General John B. Gordon referred to her as "The Daughter of the Confederacy," a nickname that eventually led to the name "United Daughters of the Confederacy." (Source: A Guide to Confederate Monuments in South Carolina: "Passing
In side Ross Hill Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
5. In side Ross Hill Cemetery
This is in side the gates of Ross Hill
the Silent Cup"
, Robert S. Seigler (1997), pg. 511.)
    — Submitted February 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Grave Stone image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
6. Grave Stone
While attending a reunion of Confederate veterans in Atlanta in July 1898, Mrs. Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin of Athens, Ga., conceived the idea of bestowing the Southern Cross of Honor on Confederate veterans . Mrs. Erwin and Mrs. Sarah E. Gabbett of Atlanta are credited with the design of the medal: a Maltese cross with a wreath of laurel surrounding the words "Deo Vindice (God our Vindicator) 1861-1865" and the inscription, "Southern Cross of Honor" on the face. On the reverse side is a Confederate battle flag surrounded by a laurel wreath and the words "United Daughters of the Confederacy to the UCV."
Significant Site Yorkville Historical Society 8 image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
7. Significant Site Yorkville Historical Society 8
Rose Hill Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 6, 2008
8. Rose Hill Cemetery
This is one of the few non-public-owned or supported city burial grounds and is operated by a self-perpetuating board of directors who depend on donations from descendants of those buried in the cemetery. The Confederate monument in the park at the front of the cemetery contains a tribute to "Our Confederate Dead" by Judge I.D. Witherspoon. The monument and cemetery are built on the site of the Independent Presbyterian Church, which was organized in 1810.

The Cemetery began in 1829 and is the resting place of many prominent South Carolina statesman.Also, at least eight Union soldiers of the Seventh Cavalry and 18th infantry, which was quartered in York as the Army of Occupation during Reconstruction, are buried in the southeast corner of the Cemetery. The 7th Cavalry later fought Native Americans with George A. Custer at the Battle of Little Big Horn and fought at the Battle of Wounded Knee.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,881 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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