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Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

First Parallel

May 28-June 1, 1781

 
 
First Parallel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
1. First Parallel Marker
Inscription.
After several days of digging an approach trench to get to this point, a first parallel was established. In siege warfare a series of trenches that face the enemy's defenses are called parallels. The first parallel established a secure position from which Greene's men could advance. The trenches were dug mostly under the cover of darkness and involved backbreaking labor.
 
Erected 2009 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 34° 8.84′ N, 82° 1.188′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker is on South Cambridge Street. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of Ninety Six Historic Park, located beside the observation tower on the north end of the battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Environmental Change From Forest to Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Island Ford Road (within shouting distance of this marker); Trader with Pack Horse (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Patriot Force Arrives (about 300 feet away); The Artillery (about
First Parallel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
2. First Parallel Marker
400 feet away); Siege Trenches (about 400 feet away but has been reported missing); Second Parallel (about 400 feet away); The Rifle Tower (about 400 feet away); The British Fortifications (about 400 feet away); Second Approach Trench (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
More about this marker. The marker shown in Photo 2 is the current version of the marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tadeusz Kościuszko. Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko (1746 – 1817) was a Polish, American, Belarusian and Lithuanian national hero and general. (Submitted on September 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Ninety Six National Historic Site. (Submitted on September 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
3. Ninety Six National Historic Site Walking Trail (pdf). (Submitted on September 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMan-Made FeaturesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Original The First Parallel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
3. Original The First Parallel Marker
In a ravine nearly 400 yards from the Star Fort, the Polish-born engineer, Kosciuszko, trained the Americans in the art of siege warfare. Groups of soldiers whose main duties included building defense works began digging the first section of approach trenches which zig-zagged across the terrain for almost 100 yards.

Digging trenches in the baked red clay required exhausting work. Kosciuszko commented that the "Ground was very hard and approaching very much like Soft Stone..." Intense heat, clouds of mosquitoes, and booming cannon fire from the fort plagued the American sappers.

They completed the first parallel on June 1. This trench, four feet wide and three feet deep, ran 60 yards to intersect Island Ford Road. Troops standing in the first parallel providing covering fire for the sappers who continued the approach tranches toward the fort.

To strengthen their siege works, the Americans used gabions (large earth-filled baskets) and fascines (bundles of tree limbs).
The First Parallel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 13, 2010
4. The First Parallel Marker
View of the Battlefield from Original The First Parallel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
5. View of the Battlefield from Original The First Parallel Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 579 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on July 10, 2016.
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