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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ninety Six in Greenwood County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

James Birmingham

 
 
James Birmingham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
1. James Birmingham Marker
Inscription.
Sacred to the Memory
of
James Birmingham
Volunteer
Long Cane Militia
Killed at this Site
In the Battle of
November 19-24, 1775
The First South Carolinian
To Give His Life in the
Cause of Freedom
----------
Erected by
The American Legion
Star Fort Post 103
Ninety Six, South Carolina
November 19, 1975

 
Erected 1975 by American Legion, Star Fort Post 103.
 
Location. 34° 8.75′ N, 82° 1.39′ W. Marker is in Ninety Six, South Carolina, in Greenwood County. Marker can be reached from South Cambridge Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ninety Six SC 29666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Monument to James Birmingham (here, next to this marker); Logan Log House (within shouting distance of this marker); Walking Tour of the Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Militiamen (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Logan Log House (about 300 feet away); Ninety Six in the American Revolution
Original Battle of Ninety Six & James Birmingham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 5, 2008
2. Original Battle of Ninety Six & James Birmingham Marker
The Battle of Ninety Six marker has been replaced by one entitled Monument to James Birmingham.
(about 400 feet away); The Siege of Ninety Six (about 400 feet away); Why Is It Called Ninety Six? (about 400 feet away); First Blood Shed for Liberty (about 400 feet away); Ninety Six National Historic Site (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Ninety Six.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located on the grounds of Ninety Six National Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ninety Six National Historic Site. Here settlers struggled against the harsh backcountry to survive, Cherokee Indians hunted and fought to keep their land, two towns and a trading post were formed and abandoned to the elements, and two Revolutionary War battles that claimed over 100 lives took place here. (Submitted on September 9, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Ninety Six National Historic Site: James Birmingham. James Birmingham, of the Long Cane Militia, is considered to have been the 1st Patriot killed in the South during the American Revolution. (Submitted on August 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Long Cane Militia. The original
Skeletal Remains Found Near the Stockade Fort Thought to by those of James Birmingham image. Click for full size.
By National Park Service, 1972
3. Skeletal Remains Found Near the Stockade Fort Thought to by those of James Birmingham
Long Cane Militia is as old as the state itself. (Submitted on August 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. James Birmingham Memorial
Located near the entrance to the stockade fort this granite stone is surrounded by an iron fence. The stone was erected to honor James Birmingham, the first South Carolinian to lose his life in the cause for freedom during the American Revolution. He was a member of the Long Cane Militia and suffered a fatal wound from a Loyalist musket ball. During one of archaeologist Stan South's early excavations in the 1970s, skeletal remains in a shallow grave were uncovered within the outlines of Williamson's Fort of 1775. The remains were photographed and removed to the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of South Carolina for further examination. are the remains those of Birmingham? The mystery will remain until conclusive evidence proves his identity beyond a doubt. (Source: Old Ninety Six: A History and Guide by Robert M. Dunkerly and Eric Williams (2006), pg 73.)
    — Submitted August 26, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 857 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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