Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

From a Burying Ground to a Park

 
 
From a Burying Ground to a Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 13, 2008
1. From a Burying Ground to a Park Marker
Inscription. In 1774, St. George’s Parish purchased the land around you for a cemetery. Following the American Revolution and disestablishment of the Anglican Church in Virginia, the Fredericksburg government appropriated this land for a public burying ground. The western lot line of the cemetery, marked by a brick wall, is visible to your right.

In 1875, the town council decided to convert the increasingly neglected grounds into a park and directed the removal of headstones and graves to other cemeterires. The new park opened July 12, 1881, named in honor of prominent local businessman John G. Hurkamp.

In 1860, St. George's Church had petitioned the Council to investigate its claim to the property, but the Civil War interrupted this process. The issue resurfaced in 1953, when the Rescue Squad sought to lease a portion of the park. By then, public usage over several generations had established legal ownership. Hurkamp Park remains public.
 
Erected by the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia.
 
Location. 38° 18.106′ N, 77° 27.776′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of William Street and Prince Edward Street, on the right when traveling east on William Street. Click for map.
From a Burying Ground to a Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 13, 2008
2. From a Burying Ground to a Park Marker
Picture taken during the annual Memory Walk.
Markers are in the center of Hurkamp Park. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Corporation Burying Ground (here, next to this marker); A Memorial Landscape (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fredericksburg Roll of Honor (about 400 feet away); Liberty Town (about 400 feet away); Masonic Cemetery (about 500 feet away); Auction Block (about 500 feet away); The Barton Street Potter's Field (about 500 feet away); Barton Street Confederate Monument (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. On the left sidebar is the following quote:
“On motion made and seconded, resolved unanimously that the new burying ground be enclosed with brick….”
Council Minutes of July 6th, 1824
Robert Lewis, Mayor (buried in the Masonic Lodge Cemetery)

Caption of picture in upper right: In 1883, John Hurkamp donated a cast iron gate bearing the name “Hurkamp Park” in raised letters. This circa 1900 photo shows this gate as well as the brick wall along the western edge of the park. The brick wall on the remaining three sides was removed in 1898. The metal gate is
406 Hanover Street, showing the ornamental cast iron fence and gate still standing. image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 15, 2007
3. 406 Hanover Street, showing the ornamental cast iron fence and gate still standing.
believed to have succumbed to a scrap metal drive during World War II.


Caption of picture in lower left: John Hurkamp resided at 406 Hanover Street, from 1862 until his death in 1886. This ornamental cast iron fence and gate, which is still standing at the above address, bears Hurkamp’s name. Both this fence and the park gate were designed by Benjamin Bowering and cast at the Hope Foundry of Fredericksburg.
 
Also see . . .  Replaced Marker. This link is the previous marker about Hurkamp Park's history. (Submitted on September 13, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
The remaining brick wall on the western side of the park. image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, August 20, 2008
4. The remaining brick wall on the western side of the park.
Another view of the brick wall image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 13, 2008
5. Another view of the brick wall
The Rescue Squad's building is on the left.
The modern center of Hurkamp Park image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, August 20, 2008
6. The modern center of Hurkamp Park
Two markers are near the fountain.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,103 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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