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Crown Point in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crown Point: Military Focus

 
 
Crown Point: Military Focus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
1. Crown Point: Military Focus Marker
Inscription. The most practical mode of travel and communication through the wilderness separating French Canada and British North America during the 18th century was by water. The Sorel (Richelieu) River, Lake Champlain, Wood Creek, and the Hudson River furnished a direct water route from Montreal to Albany, broken by portages around the rapids at Chambly on the Sorel and between the southern end of Wood Creek and the Hudson at Fort Edward. An alternative route by way of Lake George involved an additional portage around the falls at the outlet of the lake.

Crown Point, where Lake Champlain narrows to a quarter mile in width, was a natural position from which to control traffic along this route. French, British, and American forces recognized this fact, and each, in turn, made the occupation of Crown Point and control of the waterway primary objectives in military planning.
 
Erected by Crown Point State Historic Site.
 
Location. 44° 1.808′ N, 73° 25.682′ W. Marker is in Crown Point, New York, in Essex County. Marker is on Grandview Drive, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in Crown Point State Historic Site, along the walking trail. Marker is in this post office area: Crown Point NY 12928, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker at Crown Point State Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
2. Marker at Crown Point State Historic Park
Marker is located by the parking lot near the Visitor Center at Crown Point State Historic Site.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The French at Crown Point (within shouting distance of this marker); The British at Crown Point (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort St. Frédéric (about 500 feet away); “His Majesty’s Fort of Crown Point” (about 500 feet away); The Barracks (about 700 feet away); Capture of Fort St. Frédéric (about 700 feet away); Samuel Champlain (approx. 0.3 miles away); Ruins of Pre-Revolutionary Village (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Crown Point.
 
More about this marker. The center of the marker contains a map showing Crown Point in relation to the various waterways that would connect the cities of Canada with those of New York State. The marker also contains a French language version of the above text.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a Virtual Tour by Markers of the Crown Point Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Crown Point State Historic Site. New York State. (Submitted on September 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Crown Point. An Outline History. (Submitted on September 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. His Majesty’s Fort at Crown Point. The
Remains of French Fort St. Frédéric image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
3. Remains of French Fort St. Frédéric
Lake Champlain and Lake George Historic Site. (Submitted on September 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNotable PlacesWar, French and Indian
 
Remains of British Fort at Crown Point image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
4. Remains of British Fort at Crown Point
This fort, built on the highest point on the Crown Point peninsula, was one of the largest forts constructed by the British in colonial North America.
Crown Point State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
5. Crown Point State Historic Site
Marker is in Crown Point State Historic Park, along the walking trail.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,526 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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