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Ripley in Jackson County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ripley

Jackson County Courthouse

 

—The Blue and Gray Trail —

 
Ripley Jackson County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 14, 2008
1. Ripley Jackson County Courthouse Marker
Inscription. Jackson County was created by an act of the Virginia Assembly on March 1, 1831, and named in honor of President Andrew Jackson.

The first courthouse on this site was a brick structure. The land for the courthouse square was donated by Jacob and Ann Starcher. The second courthouse, a cut stone and brick structure, was completed in 1856 and was in use at the time of the Civil War. During the War Between the States, the people of Jackson County were divided in political opinions. Some wanted to remain with Virginia and fight for the Southern cause. Others supported joining the Union as a new and separate state. These different viewpoints led to great civil unrest between neighbors and relatives. The bitter feelings remained many years after the war.

Confederate and Union troops moved back and forth through Jackson County during the war. On September 3, 1863, General Albert Jenkins, while on a Confederate Cavalry raid through central West Virginia, entered Ripley with about 500 men. They took provisions from local businesses and relieved a United States military paymaster of $5,525.00. The next morning they moved on to Ravenswood
McGrew / Hood Grist Mill and Jackson County Courthouse Markers image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 14, 2008
2. McGrew / Hood Grist Mill and Jackson County Courthouse Markers
and then crossed into Ohio.

In 1915, a statue in memory of the Federal soldiers was erected on the courthouse square. The two bronze cannons displayed on this site are “mountain howitzers.” These cannons were well designed for the mountain terrain of West Virginia. They could easily be disassembled and loaded on pack animals for transport over rough roads.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 49.151′ N, 81° 42.716′ W. Marker is in Ripley, West Virginia, in Jackson County. Marker is on Court Street north of Main Street (U.S. 33), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. It is at the courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Ripley WV 25271, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Ripley (here, next to this marker); Partisan Raid (here, next to this marker); Brother Harry Ripley
Current Jackson County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 14, 2008
3. Current Jackson County Courthouse
Note the Union Soldier Monument flanked by the two Mountain Howizers.
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Ripley (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Staats Mill Covered Bridge (approx. 2.2 miles away); The Casto Hole (approx. 2.2 miles away); Staats Mill Bridge (approx. 7.2 miles away); Ravenswood / Ohio River Ford (approx. 8.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Ripley.
 
More about this marker. Marker contains a map of the Blue and Gray Trail through West Virginia on the top left and three photographs. Below the map at the lower left is a portrait of General Albert G. Jenkins. In the center right is a photograph of the old Jackson County Civil War era Courthouse. On the lower right is a photograph of Civil War veterans at a Ripley July 4th parade in the early 1920’s.
 
Also see . . .  Blue and Gray Trail, US Hwy 33. “On January 1, 1938, the various roads
Mountain Howitzer to the Right of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 14, 2008
4. Mountain Howitzer to the Right of the Monument
Markings on the muzzle read “C. A. & Co. No. 321. 224 lbs T.J.R. 1863.”
which connected Mason City in Mason Co. to Franklin and beyond became U.S. Rte. 33, which was part of the Blue & Gray trail, and extended from St. Joseph & Benton Harbor, Michigan to Richmond, Virginia to the ocean at Norfolk. The route passes through Franklin, Mouth of Seneca, Harman, Elkins, Buckhannon, Weston, Spencer, Ripley, Evans, New Haven, and Mason City, crossing the river at Mason City to Pomeroy, Ohio. It was known as the shortest and most scenic federal highway from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic ...” (Submitted on September 14, 2008.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Mountain Howitzer to the Left of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 14, 2008
5. Mountain Howitzer to the Left of the Monument
Markings on the muzzle read “C. A. & Co. No. 298. 222 lbs T.J.R. 1863.”
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,300 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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