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Anadarko in Caddo County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Chief Joseph

(Himnaton - Yalakit)

 
 
Chief Joseph Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 1996
1. Chief Joseph Marker
Sculptor: Kenneth F. Campbell
Inscription.
1838 (approx.) 1904
Famous in Military and Tactical
skill for his tribe, The Nez Perce.

 
Erected by The National Hall Of Fame For Famous American Indians.
 
Location. 35° 4.344′ N, 98° 13.66′ W. Marker is in Anadarko, Oklahoma, in Caddo County. Click for map. The National Hall Of Fame For Famous American Indians. Marker is at or near this postal address: 851 East Central Boulevard, Anadarko OK 73005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stand Watie (here, next to this marker); Tecumseh (here, next to this marker); Pontiac (here, next to this marker); Jim Thorp (here, next to this marker); Pocahontas (within shouting distance of this marker); Sequoyah (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
Regarding Chief Joseph. Some sources have Year of Birth 1840
 
Also see . . .  PBS Org. "Chief Joseph" was born in the Wallowa Valley in what is now northeastern Oregon in 1840 (Submitted on September 15, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable Persons
 
Chief Joseph Marker image. Click for full size.
Photo PBS.com by Edward Curtis
2. Chief Joseph Marker
Chief Joseph image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. Chief Joseph
This 1878 painting of Chief Joseph by Cyrenius Hall hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Chief Joseph came to embody for many the tragic plight of Native Americans during the second half of the nineteenth century His resistance to government efforts to move the Nez Perce people to a reservation drew anger from U.S. authorities, but also prompted widespread sympathy from many Americans. When troops were called in to speed the removal process in 1877, Joseph and 800 of his followers began a strategic retreat, seeking safety first among allied tribes in Montana and then heading toward Canada. Only thirty miles from the border, a command led by General Nelson Miles intercepted this band and forced Joseph to surrender. For the next eight years Joseph was imprisoned at several sites, including Fort Leavenworth in Kansas. It was there that artist Cyrenius Hall created this painting of the dispirited leader.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,927 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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