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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Army Corps

Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill

 

Army of Northern Virginia

 
Third Army Corps Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
1. Third Army Corps Tablet
Inscription.
Army of Northern Virginia
Third Army Corps Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill

Anderson's Division Major General R.H. Anderson
Heth's Division Major General Henry Heth, Brigadier General J.J. Pettigrew
Pender's Division Major General William D. Pender, Brigadier General James H. Lane, Major General I.R. Trimble
Artillery Reserve, None Batteries, Colonel R. Lindsay Walker

July 1. The Corps was near Cashtown. Heth's Division at 5 a.m. moved towards Gettysburg. Two Brigades with Artillery advancing across Willoughby Run were soon engaged. Archer's Brigade was driven across the run. After resisting an hour Heth's Division formed in line west of Willoughby Run and advanced with Pender's Division in reserve 2.30 p.m. the right of Ewell's Corps appeared on the left. Pender's Division was ordered forward. After a severe contest the Union forces were driven back and through the town. The two divisions bivouacked on the ground gained. Anderson's Division bivouacked two miles in rear.

July 2 Anderson's Division extended to the right along the crest of hills facing Cemetery Ridge. Pender's Division occupying the crest from the Seminary and joining Anderson's Division with Heth's Division in reserve. The Artillery in position on Seminary Ridge. The First Corps ordered to attack the left of Union
Third Army Corps Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 28, 2008
2. Third Army Corps Tablet
forces the Third Corps to co-operate. General Anderson moved forward three Brigades connecting with left of McLaws's Division and drove the Union forces from their position. Anderson's right becoming separated from McLaws's left and no support comming to these Brigades they retired to their former lines.

July 3. The Corps occupied the same position Reserve Batteries were placed facing the Union lines. The Confederate line held by Anderson's Division half of Pender's and half of Heth's the remainder of Corps ordered to report to General Longstreet as a support in the assault to be made on the Union position on Cemetery Ridge. About 1 p.m. the Artillery along the line opened fire 3 p.m. the assault was made and failed. Anderson's Division was held in reserve. The troops fell back to former position.

July 4. The Corps took up the line of march during the night.

Casualties killed 807, wounded 4407, missing 1491, total 6735.
 
Erected 1907 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 49.18′ N, 77° 14.824′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on West Confederate Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located on the McMillan Woods section of Confederate Avenue, in
General Ambrose Powell Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. General Ambrose Powell Hill
A native of Culpeper, Virginia, Hill was an 1847 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy. At First Manassas he commanded the 13th Virginia Infantry Regiment. He quickly rose to command a Brigade, with a promotion to Brigadier General. In the spring of 1862, he was again promoted to Major General and given command of the "Light Division" (actually one of the largest formations in the army). He served in this capacity through the Seven Days Campaign, Second Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. In the reorganization of the Army of Northern Virginia following the last mentioned battle, Hill was given command of the newly formed Third Corps, which he led through the rest of the war.
Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Marye's Battery - Pegram's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); Scales's Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Ross's Battery - Lane's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); Brockenbrough's Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Crenshaw's Battery - Pegram's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); Pegram's Battalion (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 11th Mississippi Infantry Regiment (about 400 feet away); Lane's Battalion (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .  General A.P. Hill's Report. Hill provided this detailed report in November 1863. Of his brigades that supported Longstreet's assault on July 3, he wrote:
The assault was then gallantly made, Heth's division and Trimble's two brigades on the left of Pickett. Anderson had been directed to hold his division ready to take advantage of any success which might be gained by the assaulting column, or to support it, if necessary. To that end, Wilcox and Perry were moved forward to eligible positions. The assault failed, and, after almost gaining the enemy's works, our troops fell back in disorder. (Submitted on September 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 658 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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