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Bordeaux in McCormick County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Andre Guillebeau

 
 
Andre Guillebeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
1. Andre Guillebeau Marker
Inscription.
American Revolution Patriot
Sacred
To the Memory of 1764 Huguenot Immigrant
Andre Guillebeau
Who Died in 1814
Age 75 Years

Born near Bordeaux, France. Was one of group under the leadership of the Reverend Jean Louis Gilbert, who, seeking religious freedom, settled at New Bordeaux, S.C. in the old Abbeville District from which McCormick Co. was formed.

Fought as Private and Sergeant. Received
permanent hip wound which caused him to limp
until the day of his death.

Served in the militia of S.C. as member of the
Bordeaux Regiment, Abbeville Co. under
Capt. Joseph Bouchillon, Aug. 1779 to May 1782.

 
Erected by Augusta Chapter, D.A.R.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 33° 56.767′ N, 82° 26.55′ W. Marker is in Bordeaux, South Carolina, in McCormick County. Marker is on Guillebeau Cemetery Road. Click for map. Marker is located at the end of Guillebeau Cemetery Road, near the center of the Guillebeau Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Cormick SC 29835, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured
Andre Guillebeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
2. Andre Guillebeau Marker
as the crow flies. Guillebeau Home and Family Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away); John De La Howe School Enterprise Market Program at "The Barn" (approx. 1.2 miles away); John De La Howe School (approx. 1.2 miles away); John De La Howe / John De La Howe School (approx. 1.4 miles away); De La Howe Hall (approx. 1.6 miles away); Site of Willington Presbyterian Church (approx. 2.1 miles away); Site of Willington Academy (approx. 2.2 miles away); Cherry Hill / Noble Cemetery (approx. 2.3 miles away); Willington Academy (approx. 2.3 miles away); Willington (approx. 2.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bordeaux.
 
Regarding Andre Guillebeau. Adjacent to the cemetery is the former location of the Guillbeau Cabin. In 1983, the cabin was moved to the Hickory Knob State Parker where it was restored and open for renting.
 
Also see . . .
1. Huguenot. The Huguenots were members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France (or French Calvinists) from the sixteenth to the seventeenth centuries. (Submitted on March 30, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Guillebeau Family History. France became the start of the Huguenots who were a French Calvinist of the 16th or 17th century, but for us in the United States the Huguenots
Andre Guillebeau Tombstone<br>Died in 1814 Aged 75 Yrs. image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2008
3. Andre Guillebeau Tombstone
Died in 1814 Aged 75 Yrs.
Born in France, was one of
the first settlers of this county.
Was a soldier in the
revolutionary war, and
received a wound in the hip.
were something else. (Submitted on November 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Guillebeau Cemetery Index. 2008 tombstone survey of the Guillebeau Cemetery. (Submitted on September 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. New Bordeaux. Marker located at the Bordeaux Crossroads in McCormick County. (Submitted on November 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. A History of New Bordeaux, South Carolina. In 1761, The Bounty Act was a direct result of the French and Indian War (1756-1759 in the colonies) and the Cherokee War (1760) in South Carolina. (Submitted on November 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Guillebeau House. The Guillebeau House is a good example of Southern eighteenth-century pioneer construction. (Submitted on November 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Decline of New Bordeaux
In the years following the start of the Revolutionary War, the colony vanished. Reasons for this are unclear but they may have been economic. The War had disrupted normal life in South Carolina, where the war took on a "civil war" like manner. This disruption affected townships such as New Bordeaux which was founded specifically to produce wine and silk.
    — Submitted November 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,642 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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