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Stony Point in Rockland County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle’s Aftermath

 
 
The Battle’s Aftermath Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2008
1. The Battle’s Aftermath Marker
Inscription. Although Stony Point and Verplanck’s Point became a focus of British strategy in 1779, they had shown interest in the Hudson Highlands before. On October 6, 1777, the British had landed here and attacked Forts Clinton and Montgomery, seven miles to the north, withdrawing two weeks later, after sailing up the Hudson River and burning the city of Kingston.

On May 30, 1779, the British returned. Six thousand troops left New York City, by land and water, and moved toward Stony Point. The next day, while 40 American soldiers were finishing a blockhouse near where you are standing, the first British ships appeared in Haverstraw Bay. The soldiers burned the blockhouse and fled.

After the Battle of Stony Point, the Americans destroyed the fort, removed the prisoners, and captured supplies and equipment, including 15 pieces of artillery. Two days later, General Washington abandoned the peninsula, having determined that it could not be defended against the combined might of the British army and navy.

When the Americans withdrew, the British returned, and built a second fort with blockhouses surrounded by an abatis, but the war continued to expand; by 1779, Crown forces were fighting the French and the Spanish, now allied with the Americans. The additional burdon on military resources and a lack or reinforcements compelled the
Marker on the Stony Point Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2008
2. Marker on the Stony Point Battlefield
Marker is the eleventh on the walking tour of the Stony Point Battlefield.


British to abandon the forts at Stony Point and Verplanck’s Point in October 1779. The American victory at Stony Point was the last major battle in the north. British efforts would now shift to the south, culminating with their defeat in 1781 at Yorktown, Virginia.
 
Erected by Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Site.
 
Location. 41° 14.476′ N, 73° 58.31′ W. Marker is in Stony Point, New York, in Rockland County. Marker can be reached from Stony Point Park Road, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is on the walking trail at the Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Stony Point NY 10980, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Lighthouse at Stony Point (here, next to this marker); Commerce and the Hudson River (here, next to this marker); Opportunities Missed and Taken (within shouting distance of this marker); “The fort and garrison, with Col. Johnson, are ours.” (within shouting distance of this marker); “For God’s sake, why is the Artillery here not being made use of?” (about 300 feet away, measured
Stony Point Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2008
3. Stony Point Markers
Several markers are found at this location near the Stony Point lighthouse. "The Battle's Aftermath" marker is the rightmost of the three.
in a direct line); “… with the greatest Intrepidity and coolness.” (about 400 feet away); “… the enemy entered the upper work at the barrier at the same time I did.” (about 400 feet away); Stony Point Battlefield Today (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Stony Point.
 
More about this marker. The bottom right of the marker features a “Drawing of the second British fort at Stony Point by Rufus Putnam. Reproduced courtesy of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania.” Next to this is a picture of three British ships off of Fort Independence. It has a caption of “Britain’s military power on the Hudson was centered around her navy, as represented by this detail from the Plan of the Attacks of the Forts Clinton and Montgomery upon the Hudson River. The three frigates were part of Sir Henry Clinton’s forces that moved up the Hudson River in October 1777. Fort Independence was at Peekskill, opposite Dunderberg Mountain. Published in 1784 by William Faden, Geographer to the King. Courtesy of the New York State Library.” There is also a map of the walking tour of the Stony Point Battlefield at the lower left
Map of Stony Point Battlefield Walking Tour image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2008
4. Map of Stony Point Battlefield Walking Tour
of the marker.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follow the walking tour of the Stony Point Battlefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Site. New York State. (Submitted on September 21, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Stoney Point. Account of the battle from the American Revolution War website. (Submitted on September 21, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2008
5. Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Park
This park preserves the site of one of the last major Revolutionary War battles fought in the northeastern colonies.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 785 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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