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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near East Dublin in Laurens County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Governor Troup's Home

 
 
Governor Troup's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 4, 2002
1. Governor Troup's Home Marker
Inscription. Here lived George Michael Troup, Governor of Georgia 1823-27. Born in 1780 at McIntosh's Bluff on the Tombigbee River in a part of Georgia that is now Alabama, he graduated at Princeton, 1797, and was admitted to the bar at Savannah, 1800. He served in the Georgia Legislature 1801-03, U.S. Congress 1807-15, and U.S. Senate 1816-18 and 1829-33.

When the Federal government failed to carry out its agreement to remove the Indians from Georgia, Troup in 1825 warned the President: "We have exhausted the argument. We stand by our arms". The Indians were removed.
 
Erected 1996 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 087-1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 32° 29.12′ N, 82° 49.263′ W. Marker was near East Dublin, Georgia, in Laurens County. Marker was on State Highway 199 0.9 miles north of Interstate 16, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker was in this post office area: East Dublin GA 31027, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 15 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Jefferson Davis
Governor Troup's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 1, 2009
2. Governor Troup's Home Marker
The broken remains of the marker.
(approx. 5.8 miles away); a different marker also named Jefferson Davis (approx. 5.8 miles away); Laurens County (approx. 6.2 miles away); Captain Hardy Smith House (approx. 6.3 miles away); Gov. Troupís Tomb (approx. 12.4 miles away); To Gov. Troup's Tomb (approx. 14.1 miles away).
 
Regarding Governor Troup's Home. Gov. Troup was related to the McIntosh family of Georgia, after whom McIntosh County was named, and to Chief William McIntosh of the Creek Nation. Gov. Troup negotiated the Indian Springs Treaty with Chief McIntosh, ceding Creek lands in Georgia.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Historic markers for the graves of Governor Troup and his parents, respectively.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Governor George Michael Troup. (Submitted on October 1, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
2. George Troup (1780-1856). Biography hosted by the New Georgia Encyclopedia. (Submitted on October 1, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

3. County Name Perpetuates Governor's Legacy. An article about George M. Troup, hosted by the Troup County Archives.
"George M. Troup, for whom Troup County was named, was the son of John Troup and Catherine McIntosh, and was born on the Tombigbee River, then in the territory of Georgia, on September 8, 1780. His maternal uncle, William McIntosh, married the daughter of an Indian chief, and their eldest son was William McIntosh, the president of the Creek Nation." (Submitted on October 1, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USNative AmericansNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,484 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of marker prior to its disappearance? • Can you help?
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