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Warrenton in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

McClellan’s Farewell

 
 
McClellan's Farewell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
1. McClellan's Farewell Marker
Inscription. After President Abraham Lincoln relieved Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan of command of the Army of the Potomac on 7 Nov. 1862, the general composed a farewell order. It was read to the army by divisions on 10 Nov. when the new commander, Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, held a grand review of the army about half a mile north of here. Both Burnside and McClellan attended, and the three-mile-long line of soldiers cheered McClellan heartily, many weeping. This closed McClellan’s military career. He returned home to Trenton, N.J. and ran unsuccessfully against Lincoln on the Democratic Party ticket in 1864.
 
Erected 1997 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number C 9.)
 
Location. 38° 44.274′ N, 77° 45.998′ W. Marker is in Warrenton, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is at the intersection of Lee Highway (U.S. 29) and Colonial Road / Dumfries Road, on the right when traveling south on Lee Highway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Warrenton VA 20188, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
McClellan's Farewell and Fredericksburg Campaign Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
2. McClellan's Farewell and Fredericksburg Campaign Markers
are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fredericksburg Campaign (here, next to this marker); Colonial Road (within shouting distance of this marker); Buckland Races (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Brentmoor (approx. 2.2 miles away); Brentmoor: The Spilman-Mosby House (approx. 2.2 miles away); Warrenton (approx. 2.3 miles away); John Singleton Mosby (approx. 2.3 miles away); Lafayette’s Stepping Stone (approx. 2.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Warrenton.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. McClellan's Farewell traced by markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. “McClellan Relived From Command ” Marker. (Submitted on June 17, 2007.)
2. “Rectortown - McClellan’s Demise” Marker. (Submitted on June 17, 2007.)
3. “The Warren Green” Marker. (Submitted on June 17, 2007.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Tracing McClellan’s Exit
Because Gen. McClellan was essentially the “father” of the Army of the Potomac, reliving him of duty
Wood carving of George B. McClellan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. Wood carving of George B. McClellan
This wood carving of George B. McClellan hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“This wood carving was reputedly removed from the stern of a ship built in Thomaston, Maine.” — National Portrait Gallery
was not a simple affair. He stayed on several days with the Army before finally heading home. One can trace the activities through the markers in Fauquier County. Gen. Buckingham, who carried Lincoln’s order of relief, traveled partly by train to Marshall, VA on the night of Nov. 7, 1862 (Link 1, above). There he first sought out Gen. Burnside, who was to replace McClellan. Then both traveled the 3 to 4 miles to McClellan’s headquarters at Rectortown to officially post the change (Link 2). Burnside, McClellan’s friend to the end, asked the outgoing general to stay around a few days. On Nov. 10 Burnside and McClellan held a grand review just north of the intersection of modern US 29 and Dumfries Road, where McClellan officially said farewell to the rank and file (this marker). Finally, the next day McClellan spoke to the staff and senior officers of the army at the Warren Green Hotel, Warrenton, closing with, “Stand by General Burnside as you have stood by me, and all will be well” (Link 3).
    — Submitted June 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,210 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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