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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sacramento in Sacramento County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Leland Stanford House

 
 
Leland Stanford House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, September 27, 2008
1. Leland Stanford House Marker
Inscription. The house originally designed in 1857 by Seth Babson and was purchased by Leland Stanford in 1861. It served as the State Executive Office from 1861 to 1867, before the completion of the State Capital. It was later extensively remodeled and enlarged. In 1900 Jane Lathrop Stanford gave the house to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento to create the Stanford-Lathrop Memorial Home for Friendless Children.
 
Erected 1986 by The State Department of Parks and Recreation with the cooperation and support of The Stanford Alumni Club of Sacramento. August 1, 1986. (Marker Number 614.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 38° 34.584′ N, 121° 29.875′ W. Marker is in Sacramento, California, in Sacramento County. Click for map. Marker is located in the front gardens of the Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 800 "N" Street, Sacramento CA 95814, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of the First Jewish Synagogue Owned by a Congregation on the Pacific Coast (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The California Peace Officers Memorial
Leland Stanford House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, September 27, 2008
2. Leland Stanford House Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Jesse M. Unruh State Office Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); California Mexican-American War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); California’s Historic Capitol (approx. 0.2 miles away); California State Capitol Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); California State Capitol (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sisters of Mercy (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Sacramento.
 
Regarding Leland Stanford House. The Leland Stanford Mansion is a National Historic Landmark and a California Registered Historical Landmark (No.614)
 
Also see . . .
1. The Stanford Mansion: Then and Now. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.)
2. The Stanford Mansion: Then and Now – More History. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.)
3. California State Parks: The Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.)
4. The Leland Stanford Mansion
Leland Stanford Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, September 27, 2008
3. Leland Stanford Mansion
. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.)
5. The Wandering Lizard Article: Biography of Leland Stanford. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.)
 
Additional comments.
1. National Historic Landmark - Statement of Significance (as of designation-May 27, 1987)
Built in 1857, this Renaissance Revival, two story, square house was the residence of the two Civil War Governors of California. Pro-Union Leland Stanford (1824-1893) was the first Republican to be elected Governor of the State; his successor, Frederick F. Low (1828-1894), was elected under the banner of the Union Party, a coalition of Republicans and Northern Democrats. Their leadership from 1862 to 1870 insured the State remained loyal to the Union. Stanford also served as President of the Central Pacific Railroad, which constructed the western portion of the transcontinental rail system.

The Leland and Jane Stanford House is the only surviving structure associated with Leland Stanford's career. The house is owned by California State Parks but has not been used or occupied for several years. Winter storms in 1997-98 caused damage and added to the overall deterioration. Currently State Parks is working with a private non-profit
Leland Stanford Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, September 27, 2008
4. Leland Stanford Mansion
organization to develop plans for adaptive reuse of the mansion as a museum, meeting and reception site. The plans are being developed in conjunction with representatives from the preservation community to ensure the integrity of the building.
Since this Statement of Significance was written, the Mansion has been restored. It is open to the public, and serves as a meeting and entertainment center for official state functions of the State of California
    — Submitted September 27, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.

 
Categories. 20th CenturyCharity & Public WorkChurches, Etc.GovernmentIndustry & CommerceLandmarksNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
Leland Stanford Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, September 27, 2008
5. Leland Stanford Mansion
A Stately Mansion-This Landmark Home Upholds a Tradition of Service to the State image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, September 27, 2008
6. A Stately Mansion-This Landmark Home Upholds a Tradition of Service to the State
Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park, a National Historic Landmark, served as headquarters of three governors during the turbulent 1860s. Today it welcomes leaders from around the world as the State's official reception center and public museum. As a Pro-Union Civil War governor and president of the Central Pacific Railroad, Leland Stanford negotiated political and business deals that helped complete the transcontinental railroad. Jane Lathrop Stanford gave birth to their only child, Leland Jr., here on May 14, 1868. The couple's new wealth enabled them to expand the mansion in 1872, creating the architectural legacy you see today. In the 20th Century, children in need found a home in the mansion when Jane Stanford gave it to Sacramento's Catholic diocese. California State Park bought the property and, supported by the Leland Stanford Mansion Foundation, restored its Victorian grandeur. In 2005, this stately home opened to the public, renewing its service to the state.
The Stanford-Lathrop Memorial Home for Friendless Children, C.1925 image. Click for full size.
Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park Brochure
7. The Stanford-Lathrop Memorial Home for Friendless Children, C.1925
Portrait of Leland, Jane, and Leland, Jr. 1880 image. Click for full size.
Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park Brochure
8. Portrait of Leland, Jane, and Leland, Jr. 1880
Photo Courtesy of Stanford University Archives
Northwest Corner of House Prior to 1870 image. Click for more information.
Library of Congress
9. Northwest Corner of House Prior to 1870
Prior to the raising of the house and expansion done by Leland Stanford.

Photo Source: Library of Congress
Click for more information.
Leland Stanford House - View from Northeast image. Click for full size.
By Eadweard Muybridge, circa 1872
10. Leland Stanford House - View from Northeast
Leland Stanford House - View from Northwest image. Click for full size.
September 21, 2008
11. Leland Stanford House - View from Northwest
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 3,298 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   9. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   10, 11. submitted on . This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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